Navigation Safety Regulations (SOR/2005-134)

Regulations are current to 2016-06-06 and last amended on 2011-09-30. Previous Versions

  •  (1) The searchlights required by subsection 76(1) shall be securely mounted in a position that will allow

    • (a) one searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° from bow to stern on the port side;

    • (b) one searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° from bow to stern on the starboard side; and

    • (c) each searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° forward of the beam.

  • (2) Each searchlight required by section 76 shall be provided with

    • (a) an exclusive electrical circuit connected to the main or emergency switchboard; and

    • (b) subject to subsection (3), two spare lamps and any spare electrical equipment for the searchlight that might be required for replacement under normal service conditions.

  • (3) If both searchlights required by subsection 76(1) are of the same type, only two spare lamps and any spare electrical equipment for one searchlight that might be required for replacement under normal service conditions need be carried on the ship.

Navigating Accessories

 Every ship that is required by the Charts and Nautical Publications Regulations, 1995 to carry charts and nautical publications shall be fitted with

  • (a) the navigating accessories necessary to permit the proper use of the charts so as to precisely determine the position of the ship;

  • (b) the navigating accessories necessary to determine the accuracy of compass readings; and

  • (c) at least one pair of binoculars.

Signalling Flags

  •  (1) Every Canadian ship of more than 150 tons making a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with a set of signalling flags, as illustrated in the International Code of Signals published by the IMO, of a size suitable for signalling.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a fishing vessel that was constructed before January 1, 1975 if it is fitted with signalling flags

    • (a) “N” and “C” to indicate it is in distress;

    • (b) “V” to indicate it requires assistance;

    • (c) “O” to indicate man overboard;

    • (d) “P” to indicate its nets have become fast on an obstruction;

    • (e) “T” to indicate pair-trawling, if the fishing vessel engages in pair-trawling; and

    • (f) “G” and “Z” to indicate, respectively, hauling its nets and shooting its nets, if the fishing vessel engages in those activities in close proximity to other fishing vessels and does not use the bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone to inform other vessels of its activities.

Hand Lead Lines

  •  (1) Every ship of 20 m or more in length that is engaged on a voyage other than a minor waters voyage shall be fitted with one hand lead line.

  • (2) Every ship of 20 m or more in length that is not fitted with echo-sounding equipment and is engaged on a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with two hand lead lines.

  • (3) Each hand lead line shall be not less than 46 m in length and shall be clearly and accurately marked to indicate the depth of water.

  • (4) The lead of each hand lead line shall weigh at least 3.2 kg and be capable of being armed.

PART 5Other Requirements

Search and Rescue Services

  •  (1) Every ship to which Chapter I of the Safety Convention applies that is certified to carry more than 12 passengers shall have on board a plan for co-operation with the appropriate search and rescue services in the event of an emergency.

  • (2) The plan shall be developed co-operatively by the ship, the company and the search and rescue services taking into account IMO MSC/Circ.1079, Guidelines on Preparing Plans for Cooperation Between Search and Rescue Services and Passenger Ships. It shall include provisions for the periodic undertaking of exercises to test its effectiveness.

Danger Messages

  •  (1) For the purposes of this section, tropical storm means a hurricane, typhoon, cyclone or other storm of a similar nature, and the master of a ship is deemed to have encountered a tropical storm if the master has reason to believe there is such a storm in the vicinity.

  • (2) The master of every ship shall communicate the information required by subsection (4) by all means at the master’s disposal to ships in the vicinity and to the shore station for the area if the ship encounters

    • (a) dangerous ice, a dangerous derelict or any other direct danger to navigation;

    • (b) a tropical storm or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm;

    • (c) winds of force 10 or higher on the Beaufort Scale for which no storm warning has been received by the ship; or

    • (d) sub-freezing air temperatures associated with gale force winds, causing severe ice accretion on superstructures.

  • (3) All radio communications under subsection (2) shall be preceded by the safety signal, using the procedure prescribed by the International Radio Regulations.

  • (4) The following information is required in danger messages:

    • (a) if the ship encounters dangerous ice, a dangerous derelict or any other direct danger to navigation,

      • (i) the kind of the ice, derelict or other danger encountered,

      • (ii) the position of the ice, derelict or other danger when last observed, and

      • (iii) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), when the danger was last observed;

    • (b) if the ship encounters a tropical storm or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm,

      • (i) a statement that a tropical storm has been encountered or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm has been encountered, as the case may be,

      • (ii) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), and the position of the ship when the storm was last observed, and

      • (iii) if feasible,

        • (A) the barometric pressure, with the reading corrected if practicable, the unit of measure (such as millibars, millimetres or inches) and whether the reading is corrected or not,

        • (B) the barometric tendency that indicates the change in barometric pressure during the past three hours,

        • (C) the true wind direction,

        • (D) the wind force on the Beaufort Scale,

        • (E) the state of the sea, such as smooth, moderate, rough or high,

        • (F) the size of swell, such as slight, moderate or heavy, the true direction from which it comes and, if practicable, the period or length of swell, such as short, average or long, and

        • (G) the true course and speed of the ship;

    • (c) if the ship encounters winds of a force of 10 or more on the Beaufort Scale for which no storm warning has been received by the ship,

      • (i) a statement that winds of a force of 10 or more on the Beaufort Scale have been encountered, and

      • (ii) the information set out in subparagraph (b)(ii) and as much of the information set out in clauses (b)(iii)(A) to (D) and (G) as practicable; and

    • (d) if the ship encounters sub-freezing air temperatures associated with gale force winds, causing severe ice accretion on superstructures,

      • (i) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), and position of the ship when the observation was made,

      • (ii) the air temperature,

      • (iii) the sea temperature, if practicable, and

      • (iv) the wind force and direction.

  • (5) Examples of the information required to be communicated in danger messages are set out in Schedule 3.

 
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