Toys Regulations (SOR/2011-17)

Regulations are current to 2016-12-31 and last amended on 2016-11-25. Previous Versions

Toys Regulations

SOR/2011-17

CANADA CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT

Registration 2011-02-04

Toys Regulations

P.C. 2011-53 2011-02-03

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Health, pursuant to section 37 of the Canada Consumer Product Safety ActFootnote a, hereby makes the annexed Toys Regulations.

Interpretation

Marginal note:Definitions

 The following definitions apply in these Regulations.

good scientific practices

good scientific practices means

  • (a) for test data, conditions and procedures that are in accordance with or equivalent to those set out in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development document entitled OECD Guidelines for the Testing of Chemicals, as amended from time to time; and

  • (b) for laboratory practices, practices that are in accordance with the principles set out in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development document entitled OECD Principles of Good Laboratory Practice, Number 1 of the OECD Series on Principles of Good Laboratory Practice and Compliance Monitoring, ENV/MC/CHEM(98)17, the English version of which is dated January 21, 1998 and the French version of which is dated March 6, 1998. (bonnes pratiques scientifiques)

human experience data

human experience data means data from a peer-reviewed study that demonstrate that injury to a human has or has not resulted from exposure to a substance or stuffing material. (données de l’expérience humaine)

plush toy

plush toy means a toy with a raised fibre surface that is intended for use by a child in play. (jouet en peluche)

soft toy

soft toy includes a toy that is stuffed or made of pliable rubber or pliable plastic and that is intended for use by a child in play. (jouet mou)

toy

toy means a product that is intended for use by a child in learning or play. (jouet)

  • SOR/2016-302, s. 1.

 [Repealed, SOR/2016-195, s. 1]

General

Marginal note:Official languages

 Any written statement or warning required by these Regulations must appear in both English and French.

Packaging

Marginal note:Flexible film bags

 A flexible film bag that packages a toy must meet at least one of the following requirements:

  • (a) it must have an opening of less than 356 mm (14 inches) in circumference; or

  • (b) it must be made from film that is at least 0.019 mm (0.75 mil) thick and must have the following warning or equivalent printed legibly on it in both official languages:

    “PLASTIC BAGS CAN BE DANGEROUS. TO AVOID DANGER OF SUFFOCATION, KEEP THIS BAG AWAY FROM BABIES AND CHILDREN.

    LES SACS DE PLASTIQUE PEUVENT ÊTRE DANGEREUX. POUR ÉVITER LE DANGER DE SUFFOCATION, NE LAISSEZ PAS CE SAC À LA PORTÉE DES BÉBÉS NI DES ENFANTS.”

Electrical Hazards

Marginal note:Electrically operated toys

 A toy that is operated electrically must meet the requirements of Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.2 No. 149-1972, entitled Electrically Operated Toys, published in English in November 1972 and in French in December 1976.

Marginal note:Electrically heated toys

 A toy that is an electrically operated wood-burning tool must meet the requirements of Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.2 No. 122-M1989, entitled Hand-Held Electrically Heated Tools, published in English in September 1989 and in French in May 1990.

Mechanical Hazards

Marginal note:Small parts
  •  (1) A toy that is likely to be used by a child of less than three years of age must not contain a part that is meant to be separable or may become separated with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy and that can be totally enclosed in the small parts cylinder illustrated in Schedule 1 using a force of not more than 4.45 N.

  • Marginal note:Exception — soft textile fibre material

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to parts that are constructed entirely of soft textile fibre material.

  • SOR/2012-71, s. 8(F);
  • SOR/2016-195, s. 2;
  • SOR/2016-302, s. 2.
Marginal note:Metal edges

 A toy’s exposed metal edges must be folded back or sprayed with or dipped in paint or otherwise treated so that all sharpness and burrs are eliminated.

Marginal note:Wire frames

 A wire frame or structure that is embedded in a toy must have its wire ends covered, turned in or turned back so that no sharp ends become exposed with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy.

Marginal note:Plastic edges

 A part of a toy that is made of plastic and that could, when broken, have exposed sharp edges must meet at least one of the following requirements:

  • (a) it must be sufficiently thick to resist breakage with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy; or

  • (b) it must be made of inherently tough materials, if the part is necessarily thin because of the toy’s function.

Marginal note:Wood

 A toy’s exposed wooden surfaces, edges and corners must be smoothly finished.

Marginal note:Glass

 A toy’s glass edges and corners must be smoothly finished.

Marginal note:Fasteners
  •  (1) A fastener that is used in the construction of a toy must not, because of its type, size or manner of use, cause personal injury with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy.

  • Marginal note:Further requirements

    (2) The following fasteners must meet the following requirements:

    • (a) nails and staples must be properly attached;

    • (b) flat head or oval-head wood screws of the countersunk-head type must be properly countersunk;

    • (c) wood screws must be free of exposed burrs;

    • (d) fasteners for use in upholstery or similar fasteners must be properly attached and of a type that, if exposed, would not be a hazard; and

    • (e) threaded bolts must be protected by acorn or similar nuts or protective caps, unless the bolts are so placed that they protrude into a protected area where contact with the threaded ends is not likely to occur.

  • SOR/2012-71, s. 9(F).
Marginal note:Safety stops or locking devices

 A toy’s folding mechanism, bracket or bracing must have a safety stop or a locking device to prevent the toy’s unintentional collapse.

Marginal note:Spring-wound driving mechanisms

 A spring-wound driving mechanism that is an integral part of a toy — other than a construction set — and that could injure a child’s finger must meet all of the following requirements:

  • (a) its moving parts must be enclosed so that they cannot be touched with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy;

  • (b) its outer case must be able to withstand reasonable abuse if damage to the case would cause the mechanism to be exposed;

  • (c) in the case of a toy with a non-detachable winding key, the key must be of a shape and size that does not allow a child’s finger to become caught in it; and

  • (d) in the case of a toy with a detachable key or starting handle, the clearance space between the detachable key or starting handle, when it is in place, and the rest of the toy must be less than 2 mm (1/16 inch) or more than 10 mm (3/8 inch).

Marginal note:Projectile components

 The projectile component of a toy — other than a rocketry component — that is capable of causing a puncture wound must have a rubber tip or other durable fitting placed on its leading end that is able to withstand a pulling force of 44.5 N (10 pounds).

Marginal note:Enclosures

 A toy with both of the following characteristics must have holes of sufficient size and number in each of two or more adjacent sides to prevent the suffocation of a child that is enclosed in the toy:

  • (a) it is large enough for a child to enter or be placed inside; and

  • (b) it has an opening that can be closed by a lid or door.

Marginal note:Stability

 A stationary toy that is intended to bear the weight of a child must stand level and firm when it is used.

Auditory Hazards

Marginal note:Decibel limit

 A toy must not make or emit noise of more than 100 dB when measured at the distance that the toy would ordinarily be from the ear of the child who is using it.

Thermal and Flammability Hazards

Marginal note:Heated surfaces, parts or substances

 A toy that has a surface or part, or that contains a substance, that may become heated with reasonably foreseeable use of the toy must meet the thermal and labelling requirements that are applicable to it as set out in Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.2 No. 149-1972, entitled Electrically Operated Toys, published in English in November 1972 and in French in December 1976.

 
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