Transportation Information Regulations (SOR/96-334)

Regulations are current to 2017-10-13 and last amended on 2017-06-09. Previous Versions

 A class I rail carrier, class II rail carrier or class III rail carrier must provide to the Minister once a year, before the end of 90 days after the end of the calendar year, a geospatial database or timetables depicting its network, including

  • (a) the names of the subdivisions;

  • (b) the length of the subdivisions;

  • (c) the number of tracks;

  • (d) the speed limitations, and the mile-posts between which they apply;

  • (e) the ability of the subdivisions to accommodate double-stacked container trains;

  • (f) the weight capacity of the tracks, and the mile-posts between which it applies; and

  • (g) the location of, and the type of warning system for, each grade crossing.

  • SOR/2013-196, s. 9.
  •  (1) A rail carrier referred to in column I of Schedule II.1 must provide to the Minister the details relating to the information required by subsection 10.1(1) and sections 10.2 and 12.2 that are provided for in the form referred to in column II for the reporting period set out in column III before the end of the day set out in column IV.

  • (2) If the form and manner of providing the details are set out in column V of Schedule II.1, a rail carrier referred to in column I must provide the details to the Minister in the form and manner set out.

  • SOR/2014-190, s. 6.
  •  (1) Canadian National Railway Company and Canadian Pacific Railway Company must each provide to the Minister the following information within one week after the end of a period referred to in an order made under subsection 116.2(2) of the Act:

    • (a) the volume demand for movement of grain during the period; and

    • (b) the amount of grain moved in each corridor during the period.

  • (2) In this section, grain and move have the same meanings as in section 116.1 of the Act.

  • SOR/2014-190, s. 6.
  •  (1) A class I rail carrier and class II rail carrier must provide to the Minister the following information related to railway safety:

    • (a) a summary of proficiency tests, including

      • (i) the rules set out in the Canadian Rail Operating Rules that were covered by the proficiency tests,

      • (ii) the number of passes for each rule, and

      • (iii) the number of fails for each rule;

    • (b) the number of locomotives set off en route for mechanical reasons and, for each set off, the month in which the set off occurred and the mechanical reason for the set off;

    • (c) the number of cars set off en route for mechanical reasons and, for each set off, the month in which the set off occurred and the mechanical reason for the set off;

    • (d) the number of train pull aparts caused by a broken knuckle or a broken drawbar, and, for each pull apart, the month in which the pull apart occurred and the name of the subdivision where the pull apart occurred;

    • (e) the number of broken or cracked wheels found on a train in a yard or in a repair facility, and, for each broken or cracked wheel, the month in which the wheel was found and the cause of the break or crack;

    • (f) the number of deviations from the track geometry standards set out in the Rules Respecting Track Safety, and, for each deviation, the name of the subdivision where the deviation was detected;

    • (g) the number of deviations from the defective rail standards set out in the Rules Respecting Track Safety that were detected using rail flaw testing activities, and, for each deviation, the name of the subdivision where the deviation was detected;

    • (h) the number of in-service rail failures and in-service joint pull aparts for each subdivision;

    • (i) the total tonnage, in million gross tons, transported on each segment of track, and the name of the subdivision where the segment is located;

    • (j) information related to every malfunction of an automated warning system, wayside inspection system or wayside signal system for which a trouble ticket was issued, including

      • (i) the name of the subdivision where the malfunction occurred,

      • (ii) the mileage point where the automated warning system, wayside inspection system or wayside signal system is located,

      • (iii) the number assigned by the rail carrier for the trouble ticket,

      • (iv) the date and time when the malfunction was reported,

      • (v) a description of the malfunction,

      • (vi) the name of the sub-system or component that malfunctioned,

      • (vii) the remedy that was applied to resolve the malfunction, and

      • (viii) the date and time when the malfunction was resolved;

    • (k) for each subdivision, the number of culverts that required continued monitoring at the end of the reporting period;

    • (l) for each subdivision, the number of bridges with temporary slow orders at the end of the reporting period;

    • (m) the results of all electronic geometry inspections, including

      • (i) for each inspection, the type of geometry car used and the car’s identification code,

      • (ii) for each deviation from the track geometry standards set out in the Rules Respecting Track Safety,

        • (A) the name of the subdivision where the deviation was detected and, in respect of a multiple main line territory, the identification code of the track where the deviation was detected,

        • (B) the mileage point where the deviation was detected, and

        • (C) the date on which the deviation was detected, and

      • (iii) a summary of total miles tested in each subdivision and, in respect of a multiple main line territory, a summary of total miles tested, per track identification code; and

    • (n) the results of all rail flaw inspections, including

      • (i) for each inspection, the type of rail flaw detection vehicle used and the vehicle’s identification code,

      • (ii) for each deviation from the defective rail standards set out in the Rules Respecting Track Safety that was detected using rail flaw testing activities,

        • (A) the name of the subdivision where the deviation was detected and, in respect of a multiple main line territory, the identification code of the track where the deviation was detected,

        • (B) the mileage point where the deviation was detected, and

        • (C) the date on which the deviation was detected, and

      • (iii) a summary of total miles tested in each subdivision and, in respect of a multiple main line territory, a summary of total miles tested, per track identification code.

  • (2) A rail carrier referred to in column I of Schedule II.2 must provide to the Minister the details relating to the information required by paragraphs (1)(a) to (l) that are provided for in the form referred to in column II for the reporting period set out in column III before the end of day set out in column IV.

  • (3) A rail carrier referred to in column I of Schedule II.2 must provide to the Minister, electronically using files in Excel or Comma-separated values (CSV) format, the information required by paragraphs (1)(m) and (n) for the reporting period set out in column III before the end of the day set out in column IV.

  • SOR/2014-285, s. 3.

PART IIIMarine Carriers

Interpretation

 The following definitions apply in this Part.

Canadian domiciled marine carrier

Canadian domiciled marine carrier means a marine carrier that is incorporated under the laws of Canada or a province and that operates in Canada or between Canada and another country. (transporteur maritime domicilié au Canada)

domestic marine carrier

domestic marine carrier means a foreign marine carrier or a Canadian domiciled marine carrier that transports passengers or cargo by vessel from a place in Canada to another place in Canada. (transporteur maritime intérieur)

ferry boat operator

ferry boat operator means a domestic marine carrier or international marine carrier that operates a ferry boat. (exploitant de traversier)

international marine carrier

international marine carrier means a foreign marine carrier or a Canadian domiciled marine carrier that transports passengers or cargo by ship between a port in Canada and a port outside Canada. (transporteur maritime international)

marine operator

marine operator means a Canadian domiciled marine carrier, domestic marine carrier, ferry boat operator, international marine carrier or tug boat operator. (exploitant maritime)

mode of operation

mode of operation means, in respect of a vessel, the operating profile of the vessel, such as being underway, in manoeuvres, in hotelling, at anchor or in dry dock. (mode d’exploitation)

tug boat operator

tug boat operator means a domestic marine carrier or a foreign marine carrier that operates a tug boat for the purpose of pulling or pushing barges, scows, self-propelled vessels and log booms. (exploitant de remorqueur)

  • SOR/2013-196, s. 10;
  • SOR/2014-285, s. 4.
 
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