Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2017-11-06 and last amended on 2017-09-15. Previous Versions

VFR Flight Weather Conditions

 No person shall commence a VFR flight unless current weather reports and forecasts, if obtainable, indicate that the weather conditions along the route to be flown and at the destination aerodrome will be such that the flight can be conducted in compliance with VFR.

Take-off Minima

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are at or above the take-off minima, but below the landing minima, for the runway to be used unless

    • (a) the take-off is authorized in an air operator certificate; and

    • (b) the person complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (2) A person may conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are at or above the take-off minima, but below the landing minima, for the runway to be used, if the weather conditions are at or above the landing minima for another suitable runway at that aerodrome.

  • (3) For the purposes of section 602.126, a person may conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are below the take-off minima specified in the instrument approach procedure, if the person

    • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

    • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (4) For the purposes of this section, the landing minima are the decision height or the minimum descent altitude and the visibility published for an approach.

No Alternate Aerodrome — IFR Flight

 For the purposes of section 602.122, a person may conduct an IFR flight where an alternate aerodrome has not been designated in the IFR flight plan or in the IFR flight itinerary, if the person

  • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

  • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Enroute Limitations

 No person shall operate a multi-engined aircraft with passengers on board in IFR flight or in night VFR flight if the weight of the aircraft is greater than the weight that will allow the aircraft to maintain, with any engine inoperative, the MOCA of the route to be flown.

VFR OTT Flight

 No person shall operate an aircraft in VFR OTT flight unless the person

  • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

  • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Routes in Uncontrolled Airspace

 No person shall, in uncontrolled airspace, conduct an IFR flight or a night VFR flight on a route other than an air route unless the air operator establishes the route in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

 [Reserved]

Minimum Altitudes and Distances

 For the purposes of sections 602.13 and 602.15, a person may conduct a take-off, approach or landing in a helicopter within a built-up area of a city or town, or operate a helicopter at altitudes and distances less than those specified in subsection 602.14(2), if the person

  • (a) has an authorization from the Minister or is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

  • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Weight and Balance Control

  •  (1) No person shall operate an aircraft unless, during every phase of the flight, the load restrictions, weight and centre of gravity of the aircraft conform to the limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual.

  • (2) An air operator shall have a weight and balance system that meets the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (3) An air operator shall specify in its company operations manual its weight and balance system and instructions to employees regarding the preparation and accuracy of weight and balance forms.

Passenger and Cabin Safety Procedures

  •  (1) An air operator shall establish procedures to ensure that

    • (a) passengers move to and from the aircraft and embark and disembark safely, in accordance with procedures that meet the Commercial Air Service Standards and that are specified in the air operator’s company operations manual;

    • (b) all passengers are seated and secured in accordance with subsection 605.26(1); and

    • (c) seats located at emergency exits are not occupied by passengers whose presence in those seats could adversely affect the safety of passengers or crew members during an emergency evacuation.

  • (2) No air operator shall permit an aircraft with passengers on board to be fuelled unless the fuelling is carried out in accordance with procedures that meet the Commercial Air Service Standards and that are specified in the air operator’s company operations manual.

  • (3) For the purposes of section 602.08, no air operator shall permit the use of a portable electronic device on board an aircraft unless the air operator has established procedures that

    • (a) meet the Commercial Air Service Standards; and

    • (b) are specified in the air operator’s company operations manual.

Briefing of Passengers

  •  (1) The pilot-in-command shall ensure that passengers are given a safety briefing in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (2) If the safety briefing referred to in subsection (1) is insufficient for a passenger because of that passenger’s physical, sensory or comprehension limitations, seat orientation or responsibility for another person on board the aircraft, the pilot-in-command shall ensure that the passenger is given an individual safety briefing that

    • (a) is appropriate to the passenger’s needs; and

    • (b) meets the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (3) An air operator shall ensure that each passenger is provided, at the passenger’s seat or by means of clearly visible placards, with the safety information required by the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (4) The pilot-in-command shall ensure that, in the event of an emergency and where time and circumstances permit, all passengers are given an emergency briefing in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (5) The pilot-in-command shall ensure that each passenger who is seated next to an emergency exit is made aware of how to operate that exit.

  • SOR/2009-152, s. 9.

Instrument Approach Procedures

 No person shall terminate an instrument approach with a landing unless, immediately before landing, the pilot-in-command ascertains, by means of radiocommunication or visual inspection,

  • (a) the condition of the runway or surface of intended landing; and

  • (b) the wind direction and speed.

  • SOR/2006-199, s. 17.

Approach Bans — Non-precision Approach, APV and CAT I Precision

  •  (1) For the purposes of subsections (2) to (4), the visibility with respect to an aeroplane is less than the minimum visibility required for a non-precision approach, an APV or a CAT I precision approach if, in respect of the advisory visibility specified in the Canada Air Pilot and set out in column I of an item in the table to this section,

    • (a) where the RVR is measured by RVR “A” and RVR “B”, the RVR measured by RVR “A” for the runway of intended approach is less than the visibility set out in column II of the item for the approach conducted;

    • (b) where the RVR is measured by only one of RVR “A” and RVR “B”, the RVR for the runway of intended approach is less than the visibility set out in column II of the item for the approach conducted;

    • (c) where no RVR for the runway of intended approach is available, the runway visibility is less than the visibility set out in column II of the item for the approach conducted; or

    • (d) where the aerodrome is located south of the 60th parallel of north latitude and no RVR or runway visibility for the runway of intended approach is available, the ground visibility at the aerodrome where the runway is located is less than the visibility set out in column II of the item for the approach conducted.

  • (2) No person shall continue a non-precision approach or an APV unless

    • (a) the air operator is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate;

    • (b) the aeroplane has a minimum flight crew composed of a pilot-in-command and a second-in-command;

    • (c) if the flight crew does not use pilot-monitored-approach procedures, the aeroplane is equipped with an autopilot capable of conducting a non-precision approach or an APV to 400 feet AGL or lower;

    • (d) the instrument approach procedure is conducted to straight-in minima; and

    • (e) a visibility report indicates that

      • (i) the visibility is equal to or greater than that set out in subsection (1),

      • (ii) the RVR is varying between distances less than and greater than the minimum RVR set out in subsection (1), or

      • (iii) the visibility is less than the minimum visibility set out in subsection (1) and, at the time the visibility report is received, the aeroplane has passed the FAF inbound or, where there is no FAF, the point where the final approach course is intercepted.

  • (3) No person shall continue an SCDA non-precision approach unless

    • (a) the air operator is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate;

    • (b) the aeroplane has a minimum flight crew composed of a pilot-in-command and a second-in-command;

    • (c) if the flight crew does not use pilot-monitored-approach procedures, the aeroplane is equipped with an autopilot capable of conducting a non-precision approach to 400 feet AGL or lower;

    • (d) the instrument approach procedure is conducted to straight-in minima with a final approach course that meets the requirements of section 723.41 of Standard 723 — Air Taxi — Aeroplanes of the Commercial Air Service Standards;

    • (e) the final approach segment is conducted using a stabilized descent with a planned constant descent angle specified in section 723.41 of Standard 723 — Air Taxi — Aeroplanes of the Commercial Air Service Standards; and

    • (f) a visibility report indicates that

      • (i) the visibility is equal to or greater than that set out in subsection (1),

      • (ii) the RVR is varying between distances less than and greater than the minimum RVR set out in subsection (1), or

      • (iii) the visibility is less than the minimum visibility set out in subsection (1) and, at the time the visibility report is received, the aeroplane has passed the FAF inbound or, where there is no FAF, the point where the final approach course is intercepted.

  • (4) No person shall continue a CAT I precision approach to a runway with centreline lighting unless

    • (a) the air operator is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate;

    • (b) the aeroplane has a minimum flight crew composed of a pilot-in-command and a second-in-command;

    • (c) the aeroplane is equipped with

      • (i) a flight director and autopilot capable of conducting a coupled precision approach to 200 feet AGL or lower, or

      • (ii) if the flight crew uses pilot-monitored-approach procedures, a flight director capable of conducting a precision approach to 200 feet AGL or lower;

    • (d) the runway is equipped with serviceable high-intensity approach lighting, high-intensity runway centreline lighting and high-intensity runway edge lighting; and

    • (e) a visibility report indicates that

      • (i) the visibility is equal to or greater than that set out in subsection (1),

      • (ii) the RVR is varying between distances less than and greater than the minimum RVR set out in subsection (1), or

      • (iii) the visibility is less than the minimum visibility set out in subsection (1) and, at the time the visibility report is received, the aeroplane has passed the FAF inbound or, where there is no FAF, the point where the final approach course is intercepted.

    TABLE

    APPROACH BANS — VISIBILITY

    ItemColumn IColumn II
    Canada Air Pilot Advisory VisibilityVisibility Report
    Statute milesRVR in feetStatute milesFeet
    11/22 6001/41 200
    23/44 0003/82 000
    315 0001/22 600
    41 1/45/83 400
    51 1/23/44 000
    61 3/415 000
    7215 000
    82 1/41 1/46 000
    92 1/21 1/4greater than 6 000
    102 3/41 1/2greater than 6 000
    1131 1/2greater than 6 000
  • SOR/2006-199, s. 17.
 
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