Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2016-09-18 and last amended on 2015-08-31. Previous Versions

[704.38 to 704.43 reserved]

Division IV — Aircraft Performance Operating Limitations

Exceptions

 A person may operate an aircraft without complying with the requirements of this Division if the person

  • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

  • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

General Requirements

 Any determination made for the purposes of sections 704.46 to 704.50 shall be based on approved performance data set out in the aircraft flight manual.

Take-off Weight Limitations

  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft if the weight of the aircraft

    • (a) exceeds the maximum take-off weight specified in the aircraft flight manual for the pressure-altitude and the ambient temperature at the aerodrome where the take-off is to be made; or

    • (b) after allowing for planned fuel consumption during the flight to the destination aerodrome or alternate aerodrome, exceeds the landing weight specified in the aircraft flight manual for the pressure-altitude and the ambient temperature at the destination aerodrome or alternate aerodrome.

  • (2) In the determination of the maximum take-off weight referred to in subsection (1) for a small aeroplane,

    • (a) subject to subsection (5), the required accelerate-stop distance shall not exceed the accelerate-stop distance available (ASDA); and

    • (b) the all-engines-operating take-off distance shall not exceed the take-off distance available (TODA).

  • (3) Subject to subsection (5), in the determination of the maximum take-off weight referred to in subsection (1) for a large aeroplane,

    • (a) the required accelerate-stop distance shall not exceed the accelerate-stop distance available (ASDA);

    • (b) the required take-off run shall not exceed the take-off run available (TORA); and

    • (c) the required take-off distance shall not exceed the take-off distance available (TODA).

  • (4) For the purposes of subsections (2) and (3), the following factors shall be taken into account:

    • (a) the pressure-altitude at the aerodrome;

    • (b) the ambient temperature;

    • (c) the runway slope in the direction of take-off; and

    • (d) not more than 50 per cent of the reported headwind component or not less than 150 per cent of the reported tailwind component.

  • (5) A person may conduct a take-off without meeting the requirements of paragraph (2)(a) or subsection (3) if the person

    • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

    • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Net Take-off Flight Path

  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a large aeroplane if the weight of the aeroplane is greater than the weight specified in the aircraft flight manual as allowing a net take-off flight path that clears all obstacles by at least 35 feet vertically or at least 200 feet horizontally within the aerodrome boundaries, and by at least 300 feet horizontally outside those boundaries, unless

    • (a) the take-off is authorized in an air operator certificate; and

    • (b) the person complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (2) In the determination of the maximum weight, minimum distances and flight path referred to in subsection (1),

    • (a) corrections shall be made for

      • (i) the runway to be used,

      • (ii) the runway slope in the direction of take-off,

      • (iii) the pressure-altitude at the aerodrome,

      • (iv) the ambient temperature, and

      • (v) the wind component at the time of take-off, where not more than 50 per cent of the reported headwind component or not less than 150 per cent of the reported tailwind component is considered; and

    • (b) calculations shall be based on the pilot

      • (i) not banking the aeroplane before reaching an altitude of 50 feet,

      • (ii) subject to subsection (3), using 15 degrees or less of bank at or below 400 feet, and

      • (iii) using no more than 25 degrees of bank thereafter, aircraft speed and configuration permitting.

  • (3) A bank angle greater than the 15 degrees referred to in subparagraph (2)(b)(ii) may be used if it is authorized in an air operator certificate.

Enroute Limitations with One Engine Inoperative

 No person shall operate a multi-engined aircraft with passengers on board if the weight of the aircraft is greater than the weight that will allow the aircraft to maintain, with any engine inoperative, the following altitudes:

  • (a) when operating in IMC or in IFR flight on airways or air routes, the MOCA of the route to be flown;

  • (b) when operating in IMC or in night VFR flight on routes established by an air operator, the MOCA of the route to be flown; and

  • (c) when operating in VFR flight, at least 500 feet above the surface.

Dispatch Limitations: Landing at Destination and Alternate Aerodromes

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (3), no person shall dispatch or conduct a take-off in a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane or in a large aeroplane unless

    • (a) the weight of the aeroplane on landing at the destination aerodrome will allow a full-stop landing

      • (i) in the case of a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane, within 60 per cent of the landing distance available (LDA), or

      • (ii) in the case of a propeller-driven aeroplane, within 70 per cent of the landing distance available (LDA); and

    • (b) the weight of the aeroplane on landing at the alternate aerodrome will allow a full-stop landing

      • (i) in the case of a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane, within 60 per cent of the landing distance available (LDA), or

      • (ii) in the case of a propeller-driven aeroplane, within 70 per cent of the landing distance available (LDA).

  • (2) In determining whether an aeroplane can be dispatched or a take-off can be conducted in accordance with subsection (1), the following shall be taken into account:

    • (a) the pressure-altitude at the destination aerodrome and at the alternate aerodrome;

    • (b) not more than 50 per cent of the reported headwind component or not less than 150 per cent of the reported tailwind component; and

    • (c) that the aeroplane must be landed on a suitable runway, considering the wind speed and direction, the ground handling characteristics of the aeroplane, and other conditions such as landing aids and terrain.

  • (3) Where conditions at the destination aerodrome at the time of take-off do not permit compliance with paragraph (2)(c), an aeroplane may be dispatched and a take-off conducted if the alternate aerodrome designated in the operational flight plan permits, at the time of take-off, compliance with paragraph (1)(b) and subsection (2).

Dispatch Limitations: Wet Runway — Turbo-jet-powered Aeroplanes

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), when weather reports or forecasts indicate that the runway may be wet at the estimated time of arrival, no person shall dispatch or conduct a take-off in a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane unless the landing distance available (LDA) at the destination airport is at least 115 per cent of the landing distance required pursuant to paragraph 704.49(1)(a).

  • (2) The landing distance available on a wet runway may be shorter than that required by subsection (1), but not shorter than that required by section 704.49, if the aircraft flight manual includes specific information about landing distances on wet runways.

[704.51 to 704.61 reserved]

Division V — Aircraft Equipment Requirements

General Requirements

  •  (1) No person shall operate an aircraft in IMC unless the aircraft is equipped with

    • (a) at least two generators, each of which, subject to subsection (2), is driven by a separate engine, and at least half of which have a sufficient rating to supply the electrical loads of all instruments and equipment necessary for the safe emergency operation of the aircraft; and

    • (b) two independent sources of energy and a means of selecting either source, at least one source of energy being an engine-driven pump or generator, and each source of energy being able to drive all gyroscopic instruments and being installed so that the failure of one instrument or one source of energy will affect neither the energy supply to the remaining instruments nor the other source of energy.

  • (2) In the case of a multi-engined helicopter, the generators required by paragraph (1)(a) may be driven by the main rotor drive train.

  • (3) No person shall operate an aircraft at night unless the aircraft is equipped with at least one landing light.

 
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