Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2014-04-02 and last amended on 2012-07-04. Previous Versions

Seats for Cabin Safety Inspectors

 An air operator shall provide a cabin safety inspector who is performing an in-flight cabin inspection with a confirmed passenger seat in the passenger compartment.

Flight Crew Members at Controls

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), flight crew members who are on flight deck duty shall remain at their duty stations with their safety belts fastened and, where the aircraft is below 10,000 feet ASL, with their safety belts, including their shoulder harnesses, fastened.

  • (2) Flight crew members may leave their duty stations where

    • (a) their absence is necessary for the performance of duties in connection with the operation of the aircraft;

    • (b) their absence is in connection with physiological needs; or

    • (c) they are taking a rest period and are relieved by other flight crew members who meet the qualifications set out in the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Simulation of Emergency Situations

 No person shall, where passengers are on board an aircraft, simulate emergency situations that could affect the flight characteristics of the aircraft.

Crew Member Briefing

 The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that, prior to each flight or series of flight segments, the crew members of the aircraft are given a pre-flight briefing that meets the Commercial Air Service Standards.

VFR Flight Obstacle Clearance Requirements

 Except when conducting a take-off or landing, no person shall operate an aeroplane in VFR flight

  • (a) during the day, at less than 1,000 feet AGL or at a horizontal distance of less than 1,000 feet from any obstacle; or

  • (b) at night, at less than 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle located within a horizontal distance of five miles from the route to be flown or, in designated mountainous regions, at less than 2,000 feet above the highest obstacle located within a horizontal distance of five miles from the route to be flown.

VFR Flight Weather Conditions

 No person shall commence a VFR flight unless current weather reports and forecasts, if obtainable, indicate that the weather conditions along the route to be flown and at the destination aerodrome will be such that the flight can be conducted in compliance with VFR.

Take-off Minima

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are at or above the take-off minima, but below the landing minima, for the runway to be used unless an alternate aerodrome is specified in the operational flight plan and that aerodrome is located

    • (a) in the case of a twin-engined aircraft, within the distance that can be flown in 60 minutes at the one-engine-inoperative cruise speed; or

    • (b) in the case of a three- or four-engined aircraft or where an air operator is authorized in its air operator certificate to conduct ETOPS with the type of aircraft operated, within the distance that can be flown in 120 minutes at the one-engine-inoperative cruise speed.

  • (2) A person may conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are at or above the take-off minima, but below the landing minima, for the runway to be used, if the weather conditions are at or above the landing minima for another suitable runway at that aerodrome, taking into account the aircraft performance operating limitations specified in Division IV.

  • (3) For the purposes of section 602.126, a person may conduct a take-off in an aircraft in IMC where weather conditions are below the take-off minima specified in the instrument approach procedure, if the person

    • (a) is authorized to do so in an air operator certificate; and

    • (b) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (4) For the purposes of this section, the landing minima are the decision height or the minimum descent altitude and the visibility published for an approach.