Hull Inspection Regulations (C.R.C., c. 1432)

Regulations are current to 2019-06-20 and last amended on 2007-07-01. Previous Versions

Annual Inspections

 The annual inspection referred to in subsection 18(1) shall be carried out as follows:

  • (a) the ship shall be inspected externally and internally as far as may be possible without extensive opening up, and tests, if found necessary, shall be conducted to the inspector’s satisfaction to ensure that conditions are satisfactory. Where a definite standard of subdivision has been approved, inspection shall be made to ensure that the watertight compartments and all arrangements and details connected with the subdivision are in order and that no changes affecting them have been made;

  • (b) alterations in approved subdivision arrangements and details, including watertight and non-watertight longitudinal bulkheads if fitted, appropriation of space below the bulkhead deck, and other alterations that have been made since the previous inspection shall be reported in detail; special attention shall be given to parts in the structure that are particularly subject to excessive deterioration from such causes as chafing, lying on the ground, or the handling of cargo;

  • (c) all side scuttles shall be examined, and where they are required to have special locking arrangements, the locking arrangements shall be tested and the inspector shall take such steps as are necessary to ensure that proper instructions with regard to these arrangements are posted in the chart room;

  • (d) in the case of a passenger ship,

    • (i) scupper and sanitary discharge valves and other appliances intended to prevent the accidental admission of water into the hull, except valves and cocks connected with the machinery, shall be inspected,

    • (ii) where the ship has a large number of scupper and sanitary discharge valves and cocks and examination of at least 25 per cent of those valves and cocks annually shows that they are generally in good condition, the opening up of the remainder is not necessary, but every valve and cock shall be opened for inspection

      • (A) at least once every four years, where the interval between underwater inspections is four years or less, or

      • (B) at least once every five years, where the interval between underwater inspections is five years, and

    • (iii) a record of the opening up and examination of such valves and cocks shall be kept on board the ship;

  • (e) in the case of non-passenger ships, scupper and sanitary discharge valves and any other appliances intended to prevent accidental admission of water into the hull shall be examined in place and shall be opened up for inspection

    • (i) at least once every four years where the interval between underwater inspection is not more than four years, or

    • (ii) at least once every five years where the interval between underwater inspection is five years;

  • (f) where rod and chain steering gear leads are fitted, the spares specified in section 14 shall be inspected;

  • (g) all watertight doors and other means for closing openings in the watertight subdivision shall be inspected and their condition and efficiency ascertained; the doors shall be tried by hand, and also by power, if operated by power;

  • (h) warning signals, hand gear indicators showing when doors are closed, and indicators at central closing stations shall be inspected and tested;

  • (i) hinged watertight doors shall be inspected and operated to ensure that lever-operated clips are in good order and that all joints are watertight;

  • (j) when a watertight door is removed for repairs it shall be hose-tested upon replacement, and, if practicable, shall be subjected to a hydraulic test;

  • (k) fire-resisting bulkheads and fire-resisting doors shall be inspected, and self-closing arrangements for fire-resisting doors shall be tested;

  • (l) hatchways with their closing and securing appliances, ventilators and other deck openings, casings and superstructure bulkheads with their closing appliances, windlass and anchor equipment, cargo and coaling doors, ash chutes and other openings in the shell plating, rudder, main and auxiliary steering gear shall be inspected;

  • (m) all parts of rod and chain steering gear shall be inspected; the chain in the vicinity of the blocks shall be cleaned to allow proper inspection, and where any chain is so worn that the diameter at any part is reduced to the size shown in Schedule IV, that part shall be renewed and the requirements of paragraph 24(x) complied with;

  • (n) the means for auxiliary steering shall be assembled, connected and tested;

  • (o) where cement is removed from the bottom, the condition of the bottom plating shall be determined by the inspector before new cement is laid;

  • (p) masts, spars and rigging shall be to the satisfaction of the inspector;

  • (q) annual renewal surveys for freeboard shall, whenever possible, be made at the time of the annual inspection; and

  • (r) in the case of wooden ships, parts of the ceiling shall be removed at the discretion of the inspector in order that the condition of the hull, timbers, floors, etc., particularly in the engine room, boiler room and coal bunkers, may be ascertained.

  • SOR/93-251, s. 2(F)

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship Not over Five Years Old

  •  (1) At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship not over five years old, the following requirements shall apply:

    • (a) all holds and peaks shall be cleared;

    • (b) in ships with a single bottom, limber boards and ceiling equal to not less than two strakes fore and aft on each side shall be removed, and one such strake shall be taken from the bilges; where the ceiling is fitted in hatches, the whole of the hatches and one strake of ceiling at the bilges shall be removed;

    • (c) in ships with a double bottom, a sufficient amount of ceiling shall be removed to enable the condition of the tank top to be ascertained and, if it is found that the plating is free from dirt and rust, the removal of the remainder of the ceiling may be dispensed with; all bilges and limbers fore and aft shall be cleaned;

    • (d) coal bunkers shall be cleared and ceiling removed as in the holds; in the case of Great Lakes ships, however, cleaning and ceiling removal shall be at the discretion of the inspector;

    • (e) all steel work shall be exposed and cleaned to the extent required by the inspector for a proper examination; special attention shall be given to ash chutes and shell plating in way of openings;

    • (f) in the case of a wooden ship, parts of the ceiling shall be removed at the discretion of the inspector in order that the condition of the hull, timbers, floors, etc., particularly in the engine room, boiler room and coal bunkers, may be ascertained;

    • (g) all scupper and sanitary discharge valves, excluding those connected to the machinery, not recorded as having been inspected since the first inspection, shall be opened up. All side scuttles shall be examined and, where required to have special locking arrangements, those locking arrangements shall be tested and the inspector shall take such steps as are necessary to ensure that proper instructions with regard to these arrangements are posted in the chart room;

    • (h) where signs of wastage are evident in any part of a ship’s structure, drilling may be required, and if any part is found to be defective, or if material is reduced in thickness, the defect shall be replaced by material equal in scantling and quality to that of the original construction;

    • (i) where the inner surface of the bottom plating is covered with cement or asphalt, the removal of the covering may be dispensed with when it is found, by heating or chipping, to be sound and adhering satisfactorily to the steel;

    • (j) double bottom tanks that are not used for the carriage of oil fuel shall be tested by a head of water to the light water line, but in no case less than 2.44 m above the inner bottom; in the case of Great Lakes cargo ships, the testing of tank tops may be waived at the discretion of the inspector, having regard to the voyages the ship makes;

    • (k) double bottom compartments used for the carriage of oil fuel shall be tested by a head of water or oil extending to the load water line, or by a head sufficient to give the maximum pressure that they may be required to bear at any time, whichever is the greater;

    • (l) where peak tanks or deep tanks for carrying water ballast are fitted, their watertightness shall be tested as prescribed in paragraph 7(1)(b);

    • (m) in the case of Great Lakes cargo ships, the testing of peak tanks or deep tanks may be waived if considered unnecessary by the inspector after inspection of the structure;

    • (n) all water ballast tanks shall be cleaned in order that their interior may be adequately inspected; special attention shall be given to tanks under boiler spaces;

    • (o) deep tanks constructed for carrying oil or oil and fresh water, but not used solely for that purpose, and peak tanks used for carrying oil fuel, shall be inspected and tested by a head of water or oil sufficient to give the maximum pressure that can be experienced in service, or 2.44 m, whichever is the greater;

    • (p) double bottom and deep tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or for oil fuel and fresh water, and oil fuel bunkers, need not be examined internally if after a general inspection and testing as required by paragraphs (k) or (o) their condition is found to be satisfactory;

    • (q) all watertight bulkheads, decks, tunnels and other subdivision arrangements shall be inspected to ascertain their condition, and if their watertightness has been impaired, any part found deficient shall be restored to its original condition;

    • (r) where a definite standard of subdivision has been approved, the watertight compartments and all arrangements and details connected with the subdivision shall be checked;

    • (s) all masts, spars and rigging shall be to the satisfaction of the inspector;

    • (t) anchors and other equipment shall be inspected; chain cables shall be ranged and inspected; where any length of chain cable is found to be reduced in diameter at any part to the extent indicated in Schedule IV, it shall be renewed; where renewal of anchors or cables is required, a certificate shall be produced to show that the replacement has been tested as prescribed by Schedule II, III or V; the interior of the chain locker shall be cleared and cleaned and the compartment inspected;

    • (u) hatch covers and supports, tarpaulins, cleats, battens, and other means of securing all hatches, shall be inspected;

    • (v) ventilator coamings and covers shall be inspected;

    • (w) the rudder, its means of support, and the pintles and gudgeons, shall be inspected, and, if considered necessary by the inspector for proper examination, the rudder shall be lifted;

    • (x) all steering gear leads shall be dismantled to permit of a detailed examination of all parts; where any length of chain is so worn that the diameter at any part is reduced to the size shown in Schedule IV, that part shall be renewed; all replacements of steering gear chain, or chain that has been repaired, shall be subjected to the proof and breaking tests specified in Schedule II or III; these tests shall be carried out by an authority approved by the Board and certificates of tests shall be furnished;

      • A testing authority approved by a classification society will be acceptable to the Board. In a case where testing by such an authority is not possible full particulars shall be submitted to the Chairman.
    • (y) where rod and chain steering gear leads are fitted, the spares specified in section 14 shall be inspected;

    • (z) the main steering gear shall be tested;

    • (aa) the means for auxiliary steering shall be assembled, connected and tested;

    • (bb) sluice valves and protective casings around air and sounding pipes shall be opened to permit of inspection;

    • (cc) all watertight doors and other means for closing openings in watertight subdivisions shall be inspected and their condition and efficiency ascertained, the doors shall be tried by hand, and also by power, if operated by power;

    • (dd) warning signals, hand gear indicators showing when doors are closed, and indicators at central closing stations, shall be inspected and tested;

    • (ee) hinged watertight doors shall be inspected and operated to ensure that lever-operated clips are in good order and that all joints are watertight;

    • (ff) when a watertight door is removed for repairs it shall be hose-tested upon replacement, and if practicable, shall be subjected to a hydraulic test;

    • (gg) fire-resisting bulkheads and fire-resisting doors shall be inspected and self-closing arrangements for fire-resisting doors shall be tested;

    • (hh) striking plates under sounding pipes shall be examined, and renewed when necessary; and

    • (ii) where holds are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargoes and the hull in way of the insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, it shall be sufficient to remove the limbers and hatches to expose the plating in way of these parts.

  • (2) Oil tankers are subject to the following additional requirements:

    • (a) the cargo tanks shall be cleaned and thoroughly cleared of gas;

    • (b) the strums of the cargo suction pipes shall be removed to facilitate inspection of the shell plating and bulkheads in their vicinity;

    • (c) each oil compartment and cofferdam, except in a case where the cofferdam between the engine room and the cargo tanks is used as a pump room, shall be tested by being filled with water to the top of the hatchway in the expansion trunk or cofferdam; provided that the tanks may be filled to the light water line when the ship is in dry dock and the remainder of the test carried out afloat; the centre line bulkhead need not be tested independently. Where a pump room forms the cofferdam between cargo tanks and the machinery space, the inspector shall be satisfied that the integrity of the engine room bulkhead is being maintained; and

    • (d) where extensive repairs have been made to the shell plating, the tanks shall be tested by being filled when the ship is in dry dock; where this is not practicable, particulars of any method proposed to be used in testing the tanks shall be submitted for the approval of the Board.

  • 1987, c. 7, s. 84(F)
  • SOR/93-251, s. 2(F)
 
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