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Hull Inspection Regulations (C.R.C., c. 1432)

Regulations are current to 2020-01-27 and last amended on 2007-07-01. Previous Versions

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over Five Years Old but Not over 10 Years Old

 At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship over five years old but not over 10 years old, in addition to the requirements of section 24, the following requirements shall apply:

  • (a) additional ceiling in holds and coal bunkers shall be removed to enable the condition of the inner bottom plating, pillar feet and the bottom plating of bulkheads and tunnel sides to be examined; if considered necessary by the inspector, all of the ceiling shall be removed; removal of additional ceiling and of fastenings, at the discretion of the inspector, shall apply also in the case of wooden ships;

  • (b) in ships with a single bottom, one additional strake of the limber boards and ceiling all the way fore and aft on each side shall be removed;

  • (c) all tanks that are used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, and all cofferdams adjacent to such tanks, shall be thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed and examined internally, except that

    • (i) in the case of double bottom tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, where the foremost such tank has been thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed, inspected internally and found satisfactory to the inspector, the cleaning, gas-freeing and internal examination of the other double bottom tanks used for such purpose shall not be necessary where, upon a general external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory, and

    • (ii) in the case of tanks used exclusively for oil fuel or oil fuel and fresh water, other than double bottom and peak tanks, the cleaning, gas-freeing and internal examination of those tanks shall not be necessary where, upon external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory;

  • (d) lubricating oil tanks need not be examined internally where, upon external examination, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory;

  • (e) plating in way of the side scuttles shall be exposed for examination.

  • SOR/93-251, s. 2

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over 10 Years Old but Not over 24 Years Old

 At a quadrennial or quinquennial inspection of a ship over 10 years old but not over 24 years old, in addition to the requirements of sections 24 and 25, the following requirements shall apply:

  • (a) all steel work shall be cleaned and the rust removed, to the extent required by the inspector for a proper examination;

  • (b) casings of pipes, spar ceiling and lining in way of the side scuttles shall be removed as required by the inspector;

  • (c) all the ceiling in the bunkers shall be removed for examination of the steel work; portions of the ceiling in the holds shall be removed to establish the condition of the steel work, and unless found free from rust and in good condition all of the ceiling shall be removed;

  • (d) a thorough examination shall be made of the structure inside coal bunkers, beneath ship’s side discharges, in way of boilers, steam pumps, watertight doors in machinery spaces, and in any locality where there is leakage from pipes and machinery or where continuous condensation occurs;

  • (e) subject to paragraph (f), all tanks that are used exclusively for oil fuel, oil fuel and fresh water or lubricating oil, and all cofferdams adjacent to such tanks, shall be thoroughly cleaned, gas-freed and examined internally, except that

    • (i) in the case of a ship not more than 15 years old, its tanks, other than peak tanks, that are used exclusively for oil fuel, oil fuel and fresh water or lubricating oil need not all be examined internally if, after a general inspection and testing and after an internal examination of one double bottom tank forward, one double bottom tank aft and one deep tank, the inspector finds their condition to be satisfactory, and

    • (ii) in the case of a ship more than 15 but not more than 20 years old, only one oil fuel double bottom tank amidships, one forward and one aft, and one deep tank need be examined internally, and such tanks should be selected so that as many different tanks as possible are examined internally before the ship is 20 years old;

  • (f) in the case of a ship referred to in subsection 18(2) where the interval between periodical inspections is five years, oil fuel bunkers shall be gas-freed, thoroughly cleaned and examined internally when the ship is 15 years old, except that where, upon external examination, an inspector finds the condition of the bunkers to be satisfactory, the gas-freeing, cleaning and internal examination is not necessary;

  • (g) in the case of a ship 20 years old and over making foreign voyages, home-trade voyages, Class I, home-trade voyages, Class II or home-trade voyages, Class III, other than an inland non-passenger steamship making extended home-trade voyages within the Gulf of St. Lawrence, all tanks shall be examined internally at each quadrennial inspection;

  • (h) in the case of wooden ships, the requirements for boring, fastening and removal of ceiling, as specified for previous quadrennial inspection, shall be augmented to the extent considered necessary by the inspector; hull sheathing shall be removed as considered necessary to facilitate complete examination of the hull;

  • (i) portions of the cement chocks at the ship’s sides shall be removed to permit examination of adjacent steel work;

  • (j) where the holds are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargo and the hull in way of the insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, enough insulation shall be removed from each of the chambers, and the framing and plating exposed so that their condition may be ascertained; and

  • (k) all mast and bowsprit wedging shall be removed; where the plating is doubled in way of the wedging, the wedging only need be removed.

Quadrennial or Quinquennial Inspection of a Ship over 24 Years Old

  •  (1) Where the interval between periodical inspections of a ship is four years, it shall be inspected

    • (a) in accordance with the requirements of sections 24, 25 and 26, at each quadrennial inspection; and

    • (b) in accordance with the requirements of subsection (3),

      • (i) at the first quadrennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old, and

      • (ii) every 12 years after the inspection referred to in subparagraph (i).

  • (2) Where the interval between periodical inspections of a ship referred to in subsection 18(2) is five years,

    • (a) it shall be inspected

      • (i) in accordance with the requirements of sections 24, 25 and 26 at each quinquennial inspection until the ship is 40 years old, and at every quadrennial inspection thereafter, and

      • (ii) in accordance with the requirements of subsection (3),

        • (A) at the first quinquennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old,

        • (B) at the first quadrennial or quinquennial inspection 15 years after the inspection referred to in clause (A), and

        • (C) every 12 years after the inspection referred to in clause (B); and

    • (b) the oil fuel bunkers shall be gas-freed, thoroughly cleaned and examined internally at the first quinquennial inspection after the ship is 24 years old, after the next 10 years, after the next nine years, and every eight years thereafter, except that where, upon external examination, the inspector finds the condition of the bunkers to be satisfactory, the gas-freeing, cleaning and internal examination is not necessary.

  • (3) At the inspection referred to in paragraph (1)(b) and subparagraph (2)(a)(ii), the following requirements apply:

    • (a) subject to paragraph (b), the shell plating of a ship shall be drilled at such parts as may be considered necessary to ascertain its thickness and for this purpose the following requirements apply:

      • (i) the number of holes drilled on each side of the ship shall in no case be less than three in each strake of plating not covered with cement,

      • (ii) the holes shall be drilled about amidships and in the vicinity of the peak bulkheads,

      • (iii) all paint and rust shall be removed from the area of the plating surrounding the holes before the thickness of the plating is gauged,

      • (iv) the thickness of the plating at all holes drilled shall be recorded by the inspector, and

      • (v) the plating covered with cement in the bottom of a ship need not be drilled if, in the opinion of the inspector, the cement is adhering to the plating and it is unnecessary to drill at that place;

    • (b) in the case of a Great Lakes ship, the inspector shall satisfy himself that the condition of the shell plating is satisfactory and in so doing he shall

      • (i) give special attention to those parts of the ship that are subject to damage in canals and locks and to all parts of the ship that are particularly subject to excessive corrosion or wear and tear, and

      • (ii) ascertain the thickness of the shell plating by drilling holes in such places as he deems necessary;

    • (c) where the holds of a ship are insulated for the purpose of carrying refrigerated cargo, and the hull covered by insulation was inspected when the insulation was fitted, insulation additional to that removed pursuant to paragraph 26(j) shall be removed in each of the chambers in order to allow the condition of the framing and plating to be ascertained and the shell plating drilled as prescribed in paragraph (a); and

    • (d) all mast and bowsprit wedging of a ship shall be removed whether the plating in way is doubled or not.

  • SOR/93-251, s. 2
 
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