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Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999 (SOR/2000-260)

Regulations are current to 2020-06-17 and last amended on 2017-12-19. Previous Versions

SARTs

 One of the SARTs required to be on board a ship under the Life Saving Equipment Regulations or the Large Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations shall be stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use on the ship.

  • SOR/2016-163, s. 37

EPIRBs

  •  (1) A ship that is not a tug shall be equipped with an EPIRB

    • (a) in the case of a ship that is 20 m or more in length and engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage;

    • (b) in the case of a ship that has a gross tonnage of 15 tons or more, is less than 20 m in length and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a foreign voyage;

    • (b.1) in the case of a ship carrying passengers that is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a foreign voyage; and

    • (c) beginning on April 1, 2002, in the case of a ship that has a gross tonnage of less than 15 tons, is 8 m or more in length and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a foreign voyage.

  • (2) A tug that has a gross tonnage of more than five tons shall be equipped with an EPIRB if the tug is engaged on a voyage other than

    • (a) a home-trade voyage, Class IV;

    • (b) a minor waters voyage; or

    • (c) in the case of a tug that is less than 20 m in length, a voyage of not more than 50 miles during which the tug remains within either

      • (i) two miles of shore, or

      • (ii) 20 miles of the nearest place of refuge.

  • (3) An EPIRB required by these Regulations shall be located on board a ship in a manner and in a place that would allow it

    • (a) in the case of a ship that has a gross tonnage of 15 tons or more or a tug, to float free should the ship sink;

    • (b) to be readily accessible near the position from which the ship is normally navigated, unless it can be activated by remote control from that position; and

    • (c) to be manually released and carried into a survival craft.

  • SOR/2005-128, s. 5

International NAVTEX Service

  •  (1) A ship that is engaged on a voyage in an area where an international NAVTEX service is provided shall be equipped with a NAVTEX receiver when the ship is making a voyage beyond the limits of a VHF coverage area.

  • (2) Subsection (1) applies in respect of a ship that is

    • (a) a passenger ship;

    • (b) a fishing vessel of 24 m or more in length;

    • (c) a tow-boat with a gross tonnage of 150 tons or more; or

    • (d) any other ship with a gross tonnage of 300 tons or more.

Navigation in the Arctic

  • SOR/2017-286, s. 28

Search and Rescue VHF Radio Direction-finding Apparatus

 The following ships shall be equipped with a search and rescue VHF radio direction-finding apparatus:

  • (a) a government ship used for search and rescue; and

  • (b) a standby vessel used to provide transport or assistance to employees employed on or in connection with exploration or drilling for or the production, conservation, processing or transportation of oil or gas.

Documents, Publications and other Equipment

  •  (1) A ship shall have on board and readily available the following documents and publications:

    • (a) the radio operator certificate for each of its radio operators; and

    • (b) at the main operating position of the ship station,

      • (i) a publication that lists the coast stations, the services provided by those stations and the frequencies used in the area in which the ship is navigating, and

      • (ii) the radio inspection certificate for the ship station.

  • (2) A ship that is engaged on an international voyage any part of which is in sea area A3 or A4 and is certified to carry more than 12 passengers or has a gross tonnage of 300 tons or more shall have, at the main operating position of a ship station,

    • (a) the documents listed in Section VA of Appendix 11 of the International Telecommunication Union publication entitled Manual for Use by the Maritime Mobile and Maritime Mobile-Satellite Services; and

    • (b) the International Maritime Organization publication entitled Master Plan of Shore-based Facilities for the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS Master Plan).

  • (3) A ship that is engaged on an international voyage in sea area A1 or A2 and is certified to carry more than 12 passengers or has a gross tonnage of 300 tons or more shall have, at the main operating position of a ship station, the International Telecommunication Union publication entitled

    • (a) List of Ship Stations;or

    • (b) List of Call Signs and Numerical Identities.

 The main operating position of a ship station shall have

  • (a) a card of instructions, visibly displayed, setting out a clear summary of the radio distress procedures;

  • (b) the following items, stored so as to be easily accessible:

    • (i) instructions to enable the radio equipment to be properly operated, and

    • (ii) the instructions, replacement parts and tools necessary to carry out routine maintenance and checks on the radio equipment, as recommended by the manufacturer or required by the Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999, that may be performed by persons who are not radio technicians; and

  • (c) a visibly displayed, reliable and accurate device for indicating time.

Spare Antenna

 If a ship of 20 m or more in length is equipped with only one VHF radiotelephone, the ship shall be equipped with a spare antenna accompanied by sufficient interconnecting cable to permit the fast replacement of the main antenna without retuning.

  •  (1) A ship station on board a ship that is 20 m or more in length or is engaged on a voyage north of 65° north latitude shall be equipped with a spare antenna that is fully assembled so as to permit the fast replacement of the main antenna without retuning unless the ship station

    • (a) is fully duplicated; or

    • (b) has a rigid, self-supporting antenna that is bolted or otherwise securely fixed to the ship by means of a bulkhead mount, a heavy base plate or a flange.

Sources of Electrical Energy

 A ship shall be equipped with a supply of electrical energy sufficient to operate its ship station and to charge any batteries used as part of the reserve source of energy for the ship station.

  •  (1) A ship that is 20 m or more in length, a passenger ship carrying more than six passengers or a tow-boat shall have

    • (a) a reserve source of energy that meets the requirements of the Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999, and that is sufficient to supply its ship station for the purpose of conducting distress and safety communications in the event of a failure of the main and emergency sources of electrical energy; and

    • (b) a permanent means, independent of the main and emergency sources of electrical energy, for internally or externally lighting the radio controls necessary for the operation of its ship station.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of a passenger ship carrying more than six passengers or a tow-boat, if it is

 
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