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Navigation Safety Regulations (SOR/2005-134)

Regulations are current to 2020-01-27 and last amended on 2019-06-15. Previous Versions

PART 4Additional Equipment Requirements (continued)

Automatic Identification Systems (AISs)

  •  (1) Every vessel of 150 gross tonnage or more that is carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class A.

  • (2) Every vessel, other than a fishing vessel, of 300 gross tonnage or more that is engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A.

  • (3) Every vessel, other than a fishing vessel, of 500 gross tonnage or more that is not engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A.

  • (4) Every vessel, other than a vessel subject to subsections (1) to (3), that is engaged on a voyage other than a sheltered waters voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A that meets the standards specified at item 15 of Schedule 1 or an AIS Class B if

    • (a) the vessel is certified to carry more than 12 passengers; or

    • (b) the vessel is eight metres or more in length and is carrying passengers.

  • (5) The AIS shall

    • (a) automatically provide information, including the vessel’s identity, type, position, course, speed and other safety-related information, to appropriately equipped shore stations, other vessels and aircraft;

    • (b) automatically receive such information from similarly fitted vessels;

    • (c) monitor and track vessels; and

    • (d) exchange data with shore-based facilities.

  • (6) The AIS Class A shall be operated taking into account the annex to IMO Resolution A.917(22), Guidelines for the Onboard Operational Use of Shipborne Automatic Identification Systems (AIS).

  • (7) The AIS Class B shall meet one of the following standards of the International Electrotechnical Commission:

    • (a) IEC 62287-1: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Class B shipborne equipment of the automatic identification system (AIS) — Part 1: Carrier-sense time division multiple access (CSTDMA) techniques; or

    • (b) IEC 62287-2: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Class B shipborne equipment of the automatic identification system (AIS) — Part 2: Self-organising time division multiple access (SOTDMA) techniques.

  • (8) Every vessel fitted with an AIS shall maintain it in operation at all times.

  • (9) Subsections (5) and (8) do not apply

    • (a) where international agreements, rules or standards provide for the protection of navigational information; or

    • (b) in respect of vessels, other than vessels operated for a commercial purpose, owned or operated by Her Majesty in right of Canada or by a foreign government that is a party to the Safety Convention.

  • (10) For the purposes of subsection (4), sheltered waters voyage has the same meaning as in section 1 of the Vessel Certificates Regulations.

  • (11) For the purposes of section 51 and paragraph 52(1)(a), an AIS Class B is not considered to be equipment referred to in this section.

  • SOR/2019-100, s. 1

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

Tow-boats

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship and is making a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with a gyro-compass, or other means, that can be used to determine and display its heading by shipborne non-magnetic means.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship shall be fitted with

  • (a) one radar, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance, if the tow-boat is of five tons or more and engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, an inland voyage, Class I or II, or a minor waters voyage, Class I; and

  • (b) two radars, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance, if the tow-boat is of five tons or more and engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship and is engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with echo-sounding equipment, or other electronic means, that can be used to measure and display the available depth of water.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship, is not a Safety Convention ship and is engaged in a towing operation outside the waters in which it normally operates is not required to meet any additional equipment requirements for the area outside the waters in which it normally operates if

  • (a) one of the ships engaged in the towing operation with the tow-boat is fitted with the equipment required by these Regulations for the voyage; or

  • (b) the towing operation is being undertaken in an emergency.

 [Repealed, SOR/2011-203, s. 13]

Pilot Transfer Equipment and Arrangements

  •  (1) Every ship engaged on a voyage in the course of which a pilot is likely to be employed shall be provided with pilot transfer equipment and arrangements in accordance with Regulation 23 of Chapter V of the Safety Convention.

  • (2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the reference to “Administration” in subsection 6.1 of Regulation 23 of Chapter V of the Safety Convention shall be read as “competent authority”.

  • (3) Pilot transfer equipment and arrangements with which a ship is provided shall meet the requirements of the annex to IMO Resolution A.889(21), Pilot Transfer Arrangements.

  • (4) Despite subsection (1), in the case of a Canadian ship in the waters of the Great Lakes or St. Lawrence River, if the distance from the water to the point of access of the ship is more than five metres, the ship shall provide an accommodation ladder, or other equipment that provides equally safe and convenient access to and egress from the ship, so that the climb on the pilot ladder does not exceed five metres.

Internal Communication Systems

  •  (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), every Canadian ship of 200 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and every Canadian ship of 1600 tons or more that was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with a voice communication system that includes receiving and transmitting stations, suitable for use in normal ambient noise conditions,

    • (a) at the principal conning position;

    • (b) at a position close to the main engine controls in the engine room;

    • (c) at the forward and after mooring positions;

    • (d) at the emergency steering position;

    • (e) at the steering gear compartment if the ship is a tanker, chemical carrier or gas carrier of 10 000 tons or more;

    • (f) in every radio room; and

    • (g) if such accommodation is provided, in

      • (i) the master’s accommodation,

      • (ii) the chief engineer’s accommodation, and

      • (iii) every radio operator’s accommodation, unless it is adjacent to the radio room.

  • (2) A portable receiving and transmitting voice communication system may be substituted for the system required by paragraph (1)(c) if it provides effective voice communication between the principal conning position and the forward and after mooring positions.

  • (3) On a Canadian ship of less than 1600 tons, the receiving and transmitting stations described in subsection (1) are not required if effective voice communications can be maintained in the ambient noise conditions.

  • (4) The receiving and transmitting stations required at the positions described in paragraphs (1)(a), (b) and (e) shall be capable of being operated independently of the ship’s main electrical energy supply for at least 12 hours.

  • (5) Every Canadian ship of less than 1600 tons that was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be provided with efficient means of voice communications

    • (a) between the principal conning position and the machinery space; and

    • (b) between the principal conning position and the forward and after mooring positions.

Searchlights

  •  (1) A ship shall be fitted with two searchlights if

    • (a) it is of more than five tons and is usually used for the purpose of pushing or pulling a floating object;

    • (b) it is a fishing vessel of more than 24 m in length and more than 150 tons that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984; or

    • (c) it is a Canadian ship of more than 150 tons that is navigating in ice that might cause damage that renders the ship unseaworthy.

  • (2) Every fishing vessel of more than 150 tons that is more than 24 m in length and was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with at least one searchlight.

  • (3) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply to a ship that, when used for pulling or pushing any floating object, is so used only to salvage logs.

 
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