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Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2019-06-20 and last amended on 2019-06-14. Previous Versions

Part VII — Commercial Air Services (continued)

Subpart 5 — Airline Operations (continued)

Division III — Flight Operations (continued)

Operating Instructions
  •  (1) An air operator shall ensure that all operations personnel are properly instructed about their duties and about the relationship of their duties to the operation as a whole.

  • (2) The operations personnel of an air operator shall follow the procedures specified in the air operator’s company operations manual in the performance of their duties.

General Operational Information

 Every air operator shall establish a system for the timely dissemination of general operational information that includes a means for each crew member and each flight dispatcher to acknowledge receipt of that information.

  • SOR/2009-152, s. 19
Scheduled Air Service Requirements
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), every air operator that operates a scheduled air service for the purpose of transporting persons shall operate the service between airports or heliports or between an airport or heliport and a military aerodrome.

  • (2) An air operator may operate a scheduled air service for the purpose of transporting persons between an airport and an aerodrome or between two aerodromes if the air operator is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate.

  • SOR/2007-87, s. 16
Operational Control System

 No air operator shall operate an aircraft unless the air operator has an operational control system that meets the Commercial Air Service Standards and is under the control of its operations manager.

Flight Authorization

 No person shall commence a flight unless the flight has been authorized in accordance with the procedures specified in the air operator’s company operations manual.

Operational Flight Plan
  •  (1) No air operator shall permit a person to commence a flight unless an operational flight plan that meets the Commercial Air Service Standards has been prepared in accordance with the procedures specified in the air operator’s company operations manual.

  • (1.1) An air operator shall specify in its company operations manual

    • (a) the period for which the operational flight plan referred to in subsection (3) shall be kept;

    • (b) the method of recording the formal approval of the plan by the flight dispatcher; and

    • (c) the method of recording the formal approval of the plan by the pilot-in-command.

  • (2) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that one copy of the operational flight plan is left at a point of departure, in accordance with the procedures specified in the company operations manual, and that another copy is carried on board the aircraft until the aircraft reaches the final destination of the flight.

  • (3) An air operator shall keep a copy of the operational flight plan, including any amendments to the plan, for not less than 90 days.

  • SOR/99-158, s. 9
Maintenance of Aircraft

 No air operator shall permit a person to conduct a take-off in an aircraft that has not been maintained in accordance with the air operator’s maintenance control system.

Checklist
  •  (1) Every air operator shall establish the checklist referred to in paragraph 602.60(1)(a) for each aircraft type that it operates and shall make the appropriate parts of the checklist readily available to the crew members.

  • (2) Every crew member shall follow the checklist referred to in subsection (1) in the performance of the crew member’s assigned duties.

Fuel Requirements
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no air operator shall authorize a flight and no person shall commence a flight unless the aircraft

    • (a) when operating in VFR flight, carries sufficient fuel to fly to the destination aerodrome and thereafter to fly for 45 minutes at normal cruising speed;

    • (b) when operating in IFR flight on designated routes or over designated areas as defined in the Commercial Air Service Standards, carries an enroute fuel reserve of five per cent of the fuel required to fly to the destination aerodrome; and

    • (c) when operating in IFR flight, except when complying with the Safety Criteria for Approval of Extended Range Twin-engine Operations (ETOPS) Manual, carries sufficient fuel to allow the aircraft

      • (i) to descend at any point along the route to the lower of

        • (A) the one-engine-inoperative service ceiling, or

        • (B) 10,000 feet ASL,

      • (ii) to cruise at the altitude referred to in subparagraph (i) to a suitable aerodrome,

      • (iii) to conduct an approach and a missed approach, and

      • (iv) to hold for 30 minutes at an altitude of 1,500 feet above the elevation of the aerodrome selected in accordance with subparagraph (ii).

  • (2) An air operator may be authorized in an air operator certificate to reduce the enroute fuel reserve required by paragraph (1)(b) where the air operator complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Extended Range Twin-engined Operations
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no air operator shall operate a twin-engined aeroplane on a route containing a point that is farther from an adequate aerodrome than the distance that can be flown in 60 minutes at the one-engine-inoperative cruise speed, unless the flight is conducted wholly within Canadian Domestic Airspace.

  • (2) An air operator may operate an aeroplane on a route referred to in subsection (1) where

    • (a) the aeroplane is turbine-powered;

    • (b) the air operator is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate; and

    • (c) the air operator complies with the Safety Criteria for Approval of Extended Range Twin-engine Operations (ETOPS) Manual.

Admission to Flight Deck
  •  (1) Where a Department of Transport air carrier inspector presents an official identity card to the pilot-in-command of an aircraft, the pilot-in-command shall give the inspector free and uninterrupted access to the flight deck of the aircraft.

  • (2) An air operator and the pilot-in-command shall make available for the use of the air carrier inspector the observer seat most suitable to perform the inspector’s duties, as determined by the inspector.

  • (3) No person shall be admitted to the flight deck of an aeroplane other than

    • (a) a flight crew member;

    • (b) a crew member performing their duties;

    • (c) an inspector referred to in subsection (1);

    • (d) in accordance with the procedures specified in the company operations manual,

      • (i) an employee of the air operator who is not a crew member performing their duties, and

      • (ii) a pilot, flight engineer or flight attendant employed by a wholly owned subsidiary or a code share partner of the air operator; and

    • (e) a person who has expertise related to the aeroplane, its equipment or its crew members and who is required to be in the flight deck to provide a service to the air operator.

  • (4) The air operator shall verify

    • (a) in the case of a person referred to in paragraph (3)(d) or (e), the identity of the person by means of a personal photo identification issued by the air operator, its wholly owned subsidiary, its code share partner or a foreign government or a restricted area pass as defined in the Canadian Aviation Security Regulations; and

    • (b) in the case of a person referred to in paragraph (3)(d), the fact that

      • (i) the person is currently employed by the air operator, or by a wholly owned subsidiary or code share partner of the air operator, and

      • (ii) no seat is available for the person in the passenger compartment.

  • (5) No person referred to in paragraph (3)(d), except an employee of the air operator who is undergoing the aircraft cockpit familiarization required for the performance of their duties, shall be admitted to the flight deck if a seat is available in the passenger compartment.

  • SOR/99-158, s. 10
  • SOR/2002-135, s. 1
 
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