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Pest Control Products Incident Reporting Regulations

Version of section 2 from 2007-04-26 to 2009-03-11:


Marginal note:Categories

 Incidents are classified, according to the subject of the exposure to the pest control product and the degree of severity of their effects, into the following categories:

  • (a) in the case of a human being,

    • (i) an incident whose effect is a human death,

    • (ii) an incident that has a major effect on a human, when an individual has or has had symptoms that indicate a condition that could be life-threatening or result in adverse reproductive or developmental effects or in chronic disability,

    • (iii) an incident that has a moderate effect on a human, when an individual has or has had symptoms that are more pronounced, more prolonged or of a more systemic nature than minimally bothersome symptoms, and for which some form of treatment is usually indicated, although the symptoms do not indicate a life-threatening condition and the individual is likely to return to their pre-exposure state of health without any chronic disability, and

    • (iv) an incident that has a minor effect on a human, when an individual has or has had minimally bothersome symptoms that normally resolve rapidly, including skin rash, itching, conjunctivitis, drowsiness, transient cough, headache, joint pain, agitation, restlessness or mild gastro-intestinal symptoms such as self-limited diarrhea, stomach cramps or nausea;

  • (b) in the case of a domestic animal,

    • (i) an incident whose effect is a domestic animal death,

    • (ii) an incident that has a major effect on a domestic animal, when a domestic animal has or has had symptoms that indicate a condition that could be life-threatening or result in adverse reproductive or developmental effects or in chronic disability,

    • (iii) an incident that has a moderate effect on a domestic animal, when a domestic animal has or has had symptoms that are more pronounced, more prolonged or of a more systemic nature than minimally bothersome symptoms, and for which some form of treatment is usually indicated, although the symptoms do not indicate a life-threatening condition and the animal is likely to return to its pre-exposure state of health without any chronic disability, and

    • (iv) an incident that has a minor effect on a domestic animal, when a domestic animal has or has had minimally bothersome symptoms, such as skin, eye or respiratory irritation, that normally resolve rapidly;

  • (c) in the case of the environment,

    • (i) an incident that has a major effect on the environment, when

      • (A) the number of individuals of a group or subgroup set out in column 1 or 2, respectively, of the schedule that die is at least the number set out in column 3, or

      • (B) an individual of a species at risk has or has had at least one of the symptoms set out in column 6 of the schedule,

    • (ii) an incident that has a moderate effect on the environment, when the number of individuals of a group or subgroup set out in column 1 or 2, respectively, of the schedule that have or have had at least one of the symptoms set out in column 6 is the number, or a number within the range, set out in column 4, and

    • (iii) an incident that has a minor effect on the environment, when the number of individuals of a group or subgroup set out in column 1 or 2, respectively, of the schedule that have or have had at least one of the symptoms set out in column 6 is less than the number set out in column 5;

  • (d) an incident whose effect is residues in food, when a pest control product or one of its components or derivatives is detected in food in an amount that would result in the sale of the food being prohibited under section 4 of the Food and Drugs Act;

  • (e) an incident of packaging failure, when packaging failure is observed that could result in the exposure of humans to a pest control product or in injury to humans; and

  • (f) an incident whose effects are identified in a scientific study, when the effects are observed during a human epidemiological study or a scientific investigation, whether concluded, discontinued or ongoing, and the study or investigation is sponsored by the registrant or applicant and indicates

    • (i) any new health or environmental hazard associated with a pest control product,

    • (ii) any health or environmental risk associated with a pest control product that may be greater than the risk determined at the time of registration, or

    • (iii) the presence of a previously undetected component or derivative of a pest control product.

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