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PART 5Boilers and Pressure Vessels (continued)

Use, Operation, Repair, Alteration and Maintenance (continued)

 Every boiler, pressure vessel and piping system in use at a workplace must be operated, maintained and repaired by a qualified person.

 A person must not alter, interfere with or render inoperative any fitting attached to a boiler, pressure vessel or piping system except for the purpose of adjusting or testing the fitting.

Inspections

  •  (1) Subject to section 48, every boiler, pressure vessel and piping system in use in a workplace must be inspected

    • (a) externally, at least once each year; and

    • (b) internally, at least once every five years.

  • (2) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply to a pressure vessel that is buried.

  •  (1) If a pressure vessel is used to store anhydrous ammonia, a hydrostatic test at a pressure equal to one and one-half times the maximum allowable working pressure must be conducted at least once every five years.

  • (2) The integrity of a pressure vessel that is a part of a motion compensator system or blowout preventer must be verified at least once every five years by

    • (a) if reasonably practicable, an internal inspection; or

    • (b) if an internal inspection is not reasonably practicable, by a hydrostatic test or other non-destructive test method.

  •  (1) When more than five years have elapsed since the date of the last test and inspection of a Halon container, the container must not be recharged without a test of container strength and a complete visual inspection being carried out.

  • (2) A Halon container that has been continuously in service without being discharged may be retained in service for a maximum of 20 years after the date of the last test and inspection, at which time it must be emptied, subjected to a test of container strength and a complete visual inspection and re-marked before being placed back in service.

  • (3) If a Halon container has been subjected to unusual corrosion, shock or vibration, a complete visual inspection and a test of container strength must be carried out.

 In addition to the requirements of sections 47 to 49, every boiler, pressure vessel and piping system in use at a workplace must be inspected by an inspector as frequently as is necessary to ensure that the boiler, pressure vessel and piping system is safe for its intended use.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 8

Records

  •  (1) A record of each inspection carried out under sections 44 and 47 to 50 must be completed and

    • (a) must be signed by the inspector; and

    • (b) must include

      • (i) the date of the inspection,

      • (ii) the identification and location of the boiler, pressure vessel or piping system that was inspected,

      • (iii) the maximum allowable working pressure and the maximum temperature at which the boiler or pressure vessel may be operated,

      • (iv) a declaration as to whether the boiler, pressure vessel or piping system meets the standards prescribed by this Part,

      • (v) a declaration as to whether, in the inspector’s opinion, the boiler, pressure vessel or piping system is safe for its intended use,

      • (vi) if appropriate in the inspector’s opinion, recommendations regarding the need for more frequent inspections or tests than are required by section 47, 48 or 49, and

      • (vii) any other observation that the inspector considers relevant to the safety of employees.

  • (2) The employer must keep every record for one year after the date that the next inspection is required by this Part.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 9

PART 6Levels of Lighting

Application

 This Part does not apply to the lighting of the bridge of a mobile offshore drilling unit, or of the bridge of any ship used for construction, production or diving or for geotechnical or seismic work.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 10

General

  •  (1) The levels of lighting prescribed in this Part must, if reasonably practicable, be provided by a lighting system installed by the employer.

  • (2) If it is not reasonably practicable to comply with subsection (1), the employer must provide portable lighting that gives the prescribed levels of lighting.

Measurement of Average Levels of Lighting

 For the purposes of this Part, the average level of lighting at a work position or in an area must be determined by taking four or more measurements at different places at the work position or in the area and by dividing the total of the results of the measurements by the number of measurements at the level at which the work is performed, in the case of the work is performed at a level higher than the floor or, at 1 m above the floor, in any other case.

Minimum Average Levels of Lighting

 The average level of lighting at a work position or in an area referred to in column 1 of an item of Schedule 1 must be not less than the average level set out in column 2 of that item.

Emergency Lighting Systems

  •  (1) If a failure in the lighting system in an area through which an employee passes in carrying out emergency procedures referred to in subsection 293(1) will cause the level of lighting to be reduced to less than 3 dalx, an emergency lighting system must be installed in the area.

  • (2) The emergency lighting system must

    • (a) operate automatically in the event of a failure of the lighting system; and

    • (b) provide an average level of lighting of 3 dalx.

Minimum Levels of Lighting

 The level of lighting at any place at a work position or in an area must be not less than one third of the average level of lighting prescribed by this Part for the work position or area.

PART 7Levels of Sound

Interpretation

 In this Part, sound level meter means an instrument for measuring levels of sound and impulse sound that meets the standards set out in ANSI Standard ANSI/ASA S1.4, American National Standard Specification – Sound Level Meters, and is referred to in that Standard as type 0, 1 or 2.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 11

Levels of Sound

  •  (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3) and sections 60 and 61, the level of sound in a workplace must be less than 85 dB.

  • (2) If it is not reasonably practicable for an employer to maintain the level of sound in a workplace at less than 85 dB, an employee must not be exposed in any 24-hour period to

    • (a) a level of sound referred to in column 1 of an item of Schedule 2 for a number of hours exceeding the number set out in column 2 of that item; or

    • (b) a number of different levels of sound referred to in column 1 of an item of Schedule 2, when the sum of the following quotients exceeds 1:

      • (i) the number of hours of exposure to each level of sound

      divided by

      • (ii) the maximum number of hours of exposure per 24-hour period set out in column 2 of that item.

  • (3) If it is not reasonably practicable for an employer to maintain the exposure of an employee to a level of sound at or below the levels referred to in subsection (1) or (2), the employer must

    • (a) make a report in writing to the health and safety officer setting out the reasons why the exposure cannot be so maintained; and

    • (b) provide every employee entering the workplace with a hearing protector that

      • (i) meets the standards set out in CSA Standard Z94.2, Hearing Protection Devices – Performance, Selection, Care, and Use, and

      • (ii) reduces the level of sound reaching the employee’s ears to less than 85 dB.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 12

 An employee must not be exposed in sleeping quarters to a level of sound of more than 75 dB.

 If the level of impulse sound in a workplace exceeds 140 dB, the employer must provide every employee entering the workplace with a hearing protector that

  • (a) meets the standards set out in CSA Standard Z94.2, Hearing Protection Devices – Performance, Selection, Care, and Use; and

  • (b) reduces the peak level of impulse sound reaching the employee’s ears to 140 dB or less.

  • SOR/2017-116, s. 13
 
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