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Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999 (SOR/2000-265)

Regulations are current to 2020-01-08 and last amended on 2017-07-13. Previous Versions

Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999

SOR/2000-265

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Registration 2000-06-21

Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999

The Minister of Transport, pursuant to section 343Footnote a of the Canada Shipping Act, hereby makes the annexed Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999.

Ottawa, June 4, 2000

David M. Collenette
Minister of Transport

Interpretation

  •  (1) The definitions in this subsection apply in these Regulations.

    Act

    Act means the Canada Shipping Act. (Loi)

    AMVER

    AMVER means the Automated Mutual-Assistance Vessel Rescue System which is a maritime mutual assistance program that permits the transmission, to a recognized search and rescue agency of any nation, of information concerning a ship’s position for the agency’s use during an emergency. (AMVER)

    coasting trade

    coasting trade means coasting trade as defined in section 2 of the Coasting Trade Act. (cabotage)

    continuous watch

    continuous watch means a radio watch that is uninterrupted except for brief intervals when the ship station’s receiving capability is impaired or blocked by its own communications or when it or its radio equipment is under periodical maintenance or checks. (veille permanente)

    dedicated and protected distress button

    dedicated and protected distress button has the meaning assigned in International Maritime Organization MSC/Circ. 862, dated May 22, 1998. (bouton de détresse réservé et protégé)

    digital selective calling

    digital selective calling or DSC means a technique using digital codes that enables a radio station to establish contact with, and transfer information to, another station or group of stations, which technique complies with the recommendations of the International Telecommunication Union Radiocommunication Sector. (appel sélectif numériqueouASN )

    dual watch capability

    dual watch capability, in respect of a VHF radiotelephone, means that the radiotelephone is designed

    • (a) to monitor frequency 156.8 MHz (channel 16) while a listening watch is maintained on one other selected channel; and

    • (b) to cause channel 16 to override the selected channel when a signal is received on channel 16. (système de veille double)

    enhanced group call equipment

    enhanced group call equipment means a radio installation capable of receiving maritime safety information broadcast by the enhanced group call system. (équipement d’appel de groupe amélioré)

    enhanced group call system

    enhanced group call system means a system for broadcasting messages by means of the INMARSAT-C mobile satellite communications system operated by INMARSAT. (système d’appel de groupe amélioré)

    EPIRB

    EPIRB means an emergency position indicating radio beacon that meets the requirements of sections 25 and 26. (RLS)

    Great Lakes Basin

    Great Lakes Basin means the waters of the Great Lakes, their connecting and tributary waters and the St. Lawrence River as far as the lower exit of the St. Lambert Lock at Montreal in the Province of Quebec. (bassin des Grands Lacs)

    INMARSAT

    INMARSAT means the International Maritime Satellite Organization. (INMARSAT)

    international NAVTEX service

    international NAVTEX service means the coordinated broadcast of maritime safety information in the English language on the radio frequency of 518 kHz that is automatically received on any ship through NBDP. (service NAVTEX international)

    International Radio Regulations

    International Radio Regulations means the Radio Regulations that are published by the Secretary General of the International Telecommunication Union and complement the International Telecommunication Convention, Nairobi, 1982. (Règlement international des radiocommunications)

    length

    length means overall length. (longueur)

    maritime safety information

    maritime safety information means navigational and meteorological warnings, meteorological forecasts and other urgent safety-related messages broadcast to ships. (renseignements sur la sécurité maritime)

    MF coverage area

    MF coverage area means all waters, except the waters of the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, that are within 150 miles of

    • (a) the Pacific coast between 46° and 55° north latitude, including the inner passages of the Alaskan Panhandle;

    • (b) the Atlantic coast between 40° and 60° north latitude; or

    • (c) the transmitting and receiving installations of any Canadian Coast Guard radio station that provides a continuous maritime mobile distress and safety service in the 2 MHz radio band and is located

      • (i) north of 60° north latitude, or

      • (ii) south of 60° north latitude in James Bay, Hudson Bay or Ungava Bay. (zone MF)

    MF/HF radio installation

    MF/HF radio installation means a radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving voice communications and communications using NBDP and DSC in the MF/HF bands. (installation radio MF/HF)

    MF radio installation

    MF radio installation means a radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving voice communications and communications using DSC in the MF bands. (installation radio MF)

    mile

    mile means the international nautical mile of 1 852 m. (mille)

    NAVTEX receiver

    NAVTEX receiver means a receiver that is capable of receiving international NAVTEX service messages and that meets the requirements of section 24. (récepteur NAVTEX)

    NBDP

    NBDP means the process of message transmission known as narrow-band direct-printing telegraphy that uses the International Telegraph Alphabet Number 2 Code in such a way that receiving equipment automatically produces a printed version of the transmitted message. (IDBE)

    non-Canadian ship

    non-Canadian ship means a ship that is not a Canadian ship or a non-duty paid ship within the meaning of subsection 2(1) of the Coasting Trade Act. (navire non canadien)

    owner

    owner includes a charterer. (propriétaire)

    radio inspector

    radio inspector means a person authorized by the Minister to carry out radio inspections under section 345 of the Act. (inspecteur de radio)

    radio operator

    radio operator means a person who holds a radio operator certificate issued under subparagraph 5(1)(a)(iii) of the Radiocommunication Act or an equivalent certificate issued by the appropriate authority of a foreign country and who is in charge of a radio watch on a ship. (opérateur radio)

    SART

    SART means a radar transponder designed for search and rescue purposes that meets the requirements of section 28. (répondeur SAR)

    sea area A1

    sea area A1 has the meaning assigned in Chapter IV of the Safety Convention. (zone océanique A1)

    ship earth station

    ship earth station means a mobile earth station in the maritime mobile-satellite service located on board a ship. (station terrienne de navire)

    survival craft

    survival craft means a survival craft within the meaning of the Life Saving Equipment Regulations or the Large Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations. (bateau de sauvetage)

    tow-boat

    tow-boat means a ship engaged in towing another ship or a floating object astern or alongside or in pushing another ship or a floating object ahead. (bâtiment remorqueur)

    VHF coverage area

    VHF coverage area means

    • (a) the Great Lakes;

    • (b) the Saguenay River downstream from Chicoutimi;

    • (c) the St. Lawrence River as far seaward as a straight line drawn

      • (i) from Cap-des-Rosiers to West Point, Anticosti Island, and

      • (ii) from Anticosti Island to the north shore of the St. Lawrence River along the meridian of longitude 63° west;

    • (d) Puget Sound, State of Washington, U.S.A.; or

    • (e) all waters that are within a coverage radius of a Canadian Coast Guard or U.S. Coast Guard radio station providing a continuous maritime mobile distress and safety service on frequency 156.8 MHz (channel 16). (zone VHF)

    VHF radio installation

    VHF radio installation means a radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving voice communications and communications using DSC on the VHF frequencies. (installation radio VHF)

  • (2) For the purpose of interpreting a document incorporated by reference into these Regulations, “should” shall be read to mean “shall”.

  • (3) Any reference in these Regulations to a certificate is a reference to a valid certificate.

  • (4) Unless otherwise indicated in these Regulations, any reference to a standard or document incorporated by reference is a reference to that standard or document as amended from time to time.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 1(F)
  • SOR/2016-163, s. 38

Application

  •  (1) These Regulations apply in respect of a ship station, including radio equipment, documentation and other equipment for the station, required under the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, the Life Saving Equipment Regulations, the Large Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations or the Fishing Vessel Safety Regulations to be on board

    • (a) a Canadian ship; or

    • (b) a non-Canadian ship engaged in the coasting trade.

  • (2) Sections 3, 4, 7, 33 and 35 to 37, paragraph 39(1)(b), subsection 39(2), section 50 and subsection 51(2) also apply in respect of a ship station, including radio equipment, documentation and other equipment for the station, on board a non-Canadian ship not engaged in the coasting trade, when navigating in Canadian waters.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 2
  • SOR/2016-163, s. 39

Compliance with Regulations

 The owner and the master of a ship equipped with a ship station or radio equipment to which these Regulations apply shall ensure that the requirements of these Regulations are met.

General Requirements for Ship Stations

 A ship station shall be

  • (a) installed on a ship so as to be protected from mechanical, electrical or any other interference that would adversely affect its functioning;

  • (b) installed on a ship so as to be compatible with other radio and electronic equipment installed on the ship and not to cause adverse electromagnetic or electrostatic interaction;

  • (c) installed on a ship so as to be readily accessible for maintenance purposes and inspection; and

  • (d) clearly marked with the ship’s name, call sign, maritime mobile service identity number and any other identifier that may be used in the course of transmitting or receiving communications.

Position Updating

 If radio equipment is capable of automatically providing the ship’s position when transmitting a distress alert, the ship’s position and the time the ship was at that position shall be made available for transmission by the radio equipment

  • (a) from a navigation receiver, if one is installed; or

  • (b) manually, at intervals not exceeding four hours, while the ship is under way.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 3(F)

Radio Equipment Standards

  •  (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), the International Maritime Organization standards prescribed in these Regulations do not apply in respect of radio equipment on board a ship before the coming into force of these Regulations, other than a survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus, a SART, an EPIRB and a NAVTEX receiver, if the radio equipment

    • (a) [Repealed, SOR/2006-291, s. 4]

    • (b) is compatible with equipment that meets the standards prescribed in these Regulations.

  • (2) Before February 1, 2003, a radio installation that is capable of transmitting and receiving communications using DSC, or an INMARSAT ship earth station, either of which was installed on board a ship before April 1, 2001 but that does not have a dedicated and protected distress button, or does not require at least two independent actions to transmit a distress signal, shall be

    • (a) modified to include a dedicated and protected distress button or to require at least two independent actions to transmit a distress signal; or

    • (b) replaced with equipment that has a dedicated and protected distress button.

  • (3) All radio equipment on board a ship shall

    • (a) meet the applicable performance standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.694(17), entitled General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and for Electronic Navigational Aids;

    • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard IEC 945 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Maritime Navigation and Radiocommunication Equipment and Systems — General Requirements: Methods of Testing and Required Test Results; and

    • (c) be the subject of a technical acceptance certificate if one is required under subparagraph 5(1)(a)(iv) of the Radiocommunication Act.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 4

VHF Radiotelephones

 A VHF radiotelephone on a ship shall be capable of

  • (a) transmitting and receiving communications on

    • (i) the distress and safety frequency of 156.8 MHz (channel 16),

    • (ii) the primary inter-ship safety communication frequency of 156.3 MHz (channel 6),

    • (iii) the bridge-to-bridge communication frequency of 156.65 MHz (channel 13),

    • (iv) the public correspondence frequency specifically assigned for the area in which the ship is navigating, and

    • (v) any other VHF frequencies that are necessary for safety purposes in the area in which the ship is navigating; and

  • (b) receiving communications on

    • (i) a VHF frequency specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information in the area in which the ship is navigating, or

    • (ii) if no frequency is specifically assigned in the area in which the ship is navigating, any other frequency used for transmitting maritime safety information.

 If a ship is equipped with two VHF radiotelephones, each radiotelephone shall be electrically separate and independent and capable of being used simultaneously with the other when not used on the same frequency.

 A VHF radiotelephone transmitter on a ship shall be

  • (a) capable of delivering at least 15 W but not more than 25 W of carrier power at the output of the transmitter; and

  • (b) equipped, at its main operating position in a ship station, with a switch for reducing the carrier power at the output of the transmitter to 1 W or less.

 The antenna of a VHF radiotelephone shall be

  • (a) capable of transmitting and receiving a vertically polarized signal;

  • (b) installed as high as is practicable on a ship and in such a manner as to provide an omnidirectional radiation pattern; and

  • (c) connected to the radiotelephone by the shortest possible transmission line.

 A VHF radiotelephone shall meet the standards set out in

  • (a) International Maritime Organization Resolution A.385(X), entitled Operational Standards for VHF Radiotelephone Installations; and

  • (b) International Maritime Organization Resolution A.524(13), entitled Performance Standards for VHF Multiple Watch Facilities.

 A VHF radiotelephone referred to in sections 7 to 11 may be replaced by a VHF radio installation referred to in sections 15 and 16.

Main Source of Energy for VHF Radiotelephone and VHF Radio Installation

 If batteries are the main source of energy for a VHF radiotelephone or a VHF radio installation on board a ship, the batteries shall

  • (a) be located in the upper part of the ship;

  • (b) have sufficient capacity to operate the VHF radiotelephones required to be on board the ship by the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999; and

  • (c) be provided with a charging device capable of fully charging the batteries within 10 hours.

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 1
  • SOR/2006-291, s. 5(F)

 If it is impracticable to locate the batteries in the upper part of a ship whose construction was begun before June 1, 1978 or that is less than 20 m in length, they shall be located as high in the hull as is practicable.

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 2

VHF Radio Installations

  •  (1) A VHF radio installation on a ship shall be capable of transmitting and receiving

    • (a) communications using DSC on frequency 156.525 MHz (channel 70), and

    • (b) voice communications on

      • (i) frequency 156.3 MHz (channel 6),

      • (ii) frequency 156.65 MHz (channel 13),

      • (iii) frequency 156.8 MHz (channel 16), and

      • (iv) any other frequencies that are specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information in the area in which the ship is navigating.

  • (2) A VHF radio installation shall be capable of maintaining a DSC continuous watch on frequency 156.525 MHz (channel 70), except while the radio installation’s transmitter is transmitting a communication.

  •  (1) A VHF radio installation on board a Safety Convention ship shall meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.803(19), entitled Performance Standards for Shipborne VHF Radio Installations Capable of Voice Communication and Digital Selective Calling and be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in the following standards of either

    • (a) the International Electrotechnical Commission:

      • (i) IEC 1097-3, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 3: Digital selective calling (DSC) equipment — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required testing results,

      • (ii) IEC 1097-7, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) - Part 7: Shipborne VHF radiotelephone transmitters and receivers — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, and

      • (iii) IEC 1097-8, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 8: Shipborne watchkeeping receivers for the reception of digital selective calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results; or

    • (b) the European Telecommunications Standards Institute:

      • (i) EN 300 338, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for equipment for generation, transmission and reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and/or VHF mobile service,

      • (ii) EN 301 033, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for shipborne watchkeeping receivers for reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands, and

      • (iii) ETS 300 162, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Radiotelephone transmitters and receivers for the maritime mobile service operating in the VHF bands; Technical characteristics and methods of measurement.

  • (2) A VHF radio installation on board a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall

    • (a) meet the standards prescribed in subsection (1);

    • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard EN 301 025 of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for VHF radiotelephone equipment for general communications and associated equipment for Class “D” Digital Selective Calling (DSC); or

    • (c) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard IEC 62238 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — VHF radiotelephone equipment incorporating Class “D” digital selective calling (DSC) — Methods of testing and required test results.

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 3

MF Radio Installations

 An MF radio installation on a ship shall permit

  • (a) the transmitting and receiving of distress and safety signals

    • (i) using DSC on frequency 2 187.5 kHz,

    • (ii) by voice communications on frequency 2 182 kHz, and

    • (iii) by voice communications on any other frequencies that are specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information in the area in which the ship is navigating; and

  • (b) the maintaining of a DSC continuous watch on frequency 2 187.5 kHz.

 An MF radio installation shall meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.804(19), entitled Performance Standards for Shipborne MF Radio Installations Capable of Voice Communication and Digital Selective Calling, and shall be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in the following standards of either

  • (a) the International Electrotechnical Commission:

    • (i) IEC 1097-3, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 3: Digital selective calling (DSC) equipment — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required testing results,

    • (ii) IEC 1097-8, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 8: Shipborne watchkeeping receivers for the reception of digital selective calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, and

    • (iii) IEC 1097-9, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 9: Shipborne transmitters and receivers for use in the MF and HF bands suitable for telephony, digital selective calling (DSC) and narrow band direct printing (NBDP) — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results; or

  • (b) the European Telecommunications Standards Institute:

    • (i) EN 300 338, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for equipment for generation, transmission and reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and/or VHF mobile service,

    • (ii) EN 301 033, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for shipborne watchkeeping receivers for reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands, and

    • (iii) ETS 300 373, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for maritime mobile transmitters and receivers for use in the MF and HF bands.

MF/HF Radio Installations

  •  (1) An MF/HF radio installation shall be capable of transmitting and receiving distress and safety signals on

    • (a) all frequencies in the MF band from 1 605 kHz to 4 000 kHz inclusive that are specifically assigned to the maritime mobile service;

    • (b) all frequencies in the HF band from 4 001 kHz to 27 500 kHz inclusive that are specifically assigned to the maritime mobile service; and

    • (c) any other frequencies that are specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information in the area in which the ship is navigating.

  • (2) An MF/HF radio installation shall be capable of maintaining a DSC continuous watch on

    • (a) frequency 2 187.5 kHz;

    • (b) frequency 8 414.5 kHz; and

    • (c) at least one of the following DSC distress and safety frequencies, namely,

      • (i) 4 207.5 kHz,

      • (ii) 6 312 kHz,

      • (iii) 12 577 kHz, or

      • (iv) 16 804.5 kHz.

  • (3) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply in respect of an MF/HF radio installation that is on board a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship and is capable of transmitting and receiving on the frequencies that are specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information in the area in which the ship is navigating.

 An MF/HF radio installation’s transmitter on board a ship shall be capable of delivering 125 W peak envelope power at the output of the transmitter.

 An MF/HF radio installation shall meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.806(19), entitled Performance Standards for Shipborne MF/HF Radio Installations Capable of Voice Communication, Narrow-Band Direct Printing and Digital Selective Calling, and be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in the following standards of either

  • (a) the International Electrotechnical Commission:

    • (i) IEC 1097-3, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 3: Digital selective calling (DSC) equipment — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required testing results,

    • (ii) IEC 1097-8, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 8: Shipborne watchkeeping receivers for the reception of digital selective calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, and

    • (iii) IEC 1097-9, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 9: Shipborne transmitters and receivers for use in the MF and HF bands suitable for telephony, digital selective calling (DSC) and narrow band direct printing (NBDP) — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results; or

  • (b) the European Telecommunications Standards Institute:

    • (i) ETS 300 067, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems Radiotelex equipment operating in the maritime MF/HF service Technical characteristics and methods of measurement,

    • (ii) EN 300 338, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for equipment for generation, transmission and reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and/or VHF mobile service,

    • (iii) ETS 300 373, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for maritime mobile transmitters and receivers for use in the MF and HF bands, and

    • (iv) EN 301 033, entitled Electromagnetic compatibility and Radio spectrum Matters (ERM); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for shipborne watchkeeping receivers for reception of Digital Selective Calling (DSC) in the maritime MF, MF/HF and VHF bands.

INMARSAT Ship Earth Station

  •  (1) An INMARSAT ship earth station shall be capable of

    • (a) transmitting and receiving

      • (i) distress and safety signals using NBDP,

      • (ii) priority distress calls, and

      • (iii) general communications, using voice communications or NBDP; and

    • (b) maintaining a continuous watch for shore-to-ship distress alerts, including those distress signals that are directed to specific geographical areas.

  • (2) An INMARSAT ship earth station shall

    • (a) meet the applicable performance standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution

      • (i) A.807(19), entitled Performance Standards for INMARSAT-C Ship Earth Stations Capable of Transmitting and Receiving Direct-Printing Communications, or

      • (ii) A.808(19), entitled Performance Standards for Ship Earth Stations Capable of Two-Way Communications; and

    • (b) be type-approved by INMARSAT as having passed the INMARSAT tests set out in the standards referred to in paragraph (a).

Enhanced Group Call Equipment

 Enhanced group call equipment shall

  • (a) meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.664(16), entitled Performance Standards for Enhanced Group Call Equipment; and

  • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard IEC 1097-4 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 4: INMARSAT-C ship earth station and INMARSAT enhanced group call (EGC) equipment — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results.

International NAVTEX Service

 A NAVTEX receiver shall

  • (a) meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution

    • (i) A.525(13), entitled Performance Standards for Narrow-Band Direct Printing Telegraph Equipment for the Reception of Navigational and Meteorological Warnings and Urgent Information to Ships, and

    • (ii) A.694(17), entitled General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and for Electronic Navigational Aids; and

  • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard

    • (i) IEC 1097-6 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 6: Narrowband direct-printing telegraph equipment for the reception of navigational and meteorological warnings and urgent information to ships (NAVTEX) — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, or

    • (ii) ETS 300 065 of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); Narrow-band direct-printing telegraph equipment for receiving meteorological or navigational information (NAVTEX) — Technical characteristics and methods of measurement.

EPIRB

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), an EPIRB shall meet the requirements prescribed in any one of paragraphs (a) to (c):

    • (a) the EPIRB shall

      • (i) meet the applicable standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution

        • (A) A.810(19), entitled Performance Standards for Float-Free Satellite Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRBs) Operating on 406 MHz, and

        • (B) A.662(16), entitled Performance Standards for Float-Free Release and Activation Arrangements for Emergency Radio Equipment,

      • (ii) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard

        • (A) IEC 1097-2 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 2: COSPAS-SARSAT EPIRB — Satellite emergency position indicating radio beacon operating on 406 MHz — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, or

        • (B) ETS 300 066 of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); Float-free maritime satellite Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons (EPIRB’s) operating on 406,025 MHz; Technical characteristics and methods of measurement, and

      • (iii) be type-approved by COSPAS-SARSAT as having passed the tests set out in COSPAS-SARSAT 406 MHz Distress Beacon Type Approval Standard, C/S T.007;

    • (b) the EPIRB shall

      • (i) meet the applicable standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution

        • (A) A.812(19), entitled Performance Standards for Float-Free Satellite Operating through the Geostationary Inmarsat Satellite System on 1.6 GHz, if the ship is equipped with an MF/HF radio installation, and

        • (B) A.662(16), entitled Performance Standards for Float-Free Release and Activation Arrangements for Emergency Radio Equipment, and

      • (ii) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard IEC 1097-5 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 5: Inmarsat-E — Emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) operating through the Inmarsat System — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results; or

    • (c) the EPIRB shall

      • (i) meet the standards set out in TP 4522 of the Department of Transport, entitled Performance Standard for 406 MHz Satellite Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) Class I and II, if the EPIRB was approved by the Department of Industry before April 1, 2001, and

      • (ii) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests required by the standard set out in TP 4522.

  • (2) The requirements respecting the float-free release and activation arrangements do not apply in respect of an EPIRB

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 5(F)
  • SOR/2016-163, s. 41

 An EPIRB transmitting on frequency 406 MHz shall have its digital message coded in the format of the Serialized User Protocol developed by COSPAS-SARSAT and registered by the owner of the ship with the Canadian Beacon Registry maintained by the National Search and Rescue Secretariat of the Department of National Defence.

  •  (1) The automatic release mechanism of an EPIRB shall be marked with the replacement date determined by the manufacturer and be replaced on or before that date in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.

  • (2) The battery of an EPIRB shall be replaced by its manufacturer or the manufacturer’s authorized agent

    • (a) after the use of the EPIRB in an emergency;

    • (b) after an inadvertent activation of the EPIRB for a period of unknown duration;

    • (c) during an inspection or testing of the EPIRB, if required; and

    • (d) on or before the expiry date indicated on the battery.

SARTs

 A SART shall

  • (a) meet the standards set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.802(19), entitled Performance Standards for Survival Craft Radar Transponders for Use in Search and Rescue Operations; and

  • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in standard

    • (i) IEC 1097-1 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 1: Radar transponder — Marine search and rescue (SART) — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, or

    • (ii) I-ETS 300 151 of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); 9 GHz radar transponders for use in search and rescue operations Technical characteristics and methods of measurement.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 6

 The battery of a SART shall be replaced by the manufacturer of the SART or the manufacturer’s authorized agent, on or before the expiry date indicated on the battery, by a battery with an expiry date that is at least two years after the date of replacement.

Survival Craft VHF Radiotelephone Apparatus

  •  (1) A survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus with which a ship is equipped under the Life Saving Equipment Regulations or the Large Fishing Vessel Inspection Regulations shall

    • (a) meet the standards set out in the applicable annex to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.809(19), entitled Performance Standards for Survival Craft Two-Way VHF Radiotelephone Apparatus, as follows:

      • (i) Annex 1, in the case of a portable apparatus, and

      • (ii) Annex 2, in the case of a fixed apparatus;

    • (b) be certified by a country to which the Safety Convention applies as having passed the tests set out in

      • (i) Clause 5 of Part 12 of standard IEC 1097-12 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Global maritime distress and safety system (GMDSS) — Part 12: Survival craft portable two-way VHF radiotelephone apparatus — Operational and performance requirements, methods of testing and required test results, or

      • (ii) standard I-ETS 300 225 of the European Telecommunications Standards Institute, entitled Radio Equipment and Systems (RES); Technical characteristics and methods of measurement for survival craft portable VHF radiotelephone apparatus; and

    • (c) be able to transmit and receive communications on

      • (i) the distress and safety frequency of 156.8 MHz (channel 16), and

      • (ii) the primary inter-ship safety communication frequency of 156.3 MHz (channel 6).

  • (2) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply in respect of a survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus that meets the performance standards set out in the annexes to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.762(18), entitled Performance Standards for Survival Craft Two-way VHF Radiotelephone Apparatus and one of the following conditions:

    • (a) it was on board a Safety Convention ship before November 23, 1996 and continues to be on board the same ship; or

    • (b) it was on board a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship before June 1, 1997 and continues to be on board the same ship.

  • (3) A battery used to power a VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall

    • (a) if the battery is non-rechargeable, be replaced, on or before the expiry date indicated on the battery, with a battery that has an expiry date that is at least two years after the date of replacement; or

    • (b) if the battery is rechargeable, be maintained in a fully charged condition while the ship is at sea and the VHF radiotelephone is not being used for communication purposes.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 7(F)

 No person shall equip a survival craft with a fixed VHF radiotelephone apparatus unless the survival craft

  • (a) is equipped with a cabin that is large enough to accommodate the apparatus and the person using it; and

  • (b) if the antenna of the apparatus is separately mounted, is provided with a device for installing and securing the antenna in its operating position.

Search and Rescue VHF Radio Direction-finding Equipment

 Search and rescue VHF radio direction-finding equipment shall

  • (a) be capable of receiving amplitude-modulated signals on frequency 121.5 MHz;

  • (b) be capable of receiving frequency or phase-modulated signals on frequency 156.8 MHz (channel 16);

  • (c) provide an automatic indication-of-direction signal that is received when the source of the signal is located within an arc of 30° on either side of the ship’s bow;

  • (d) provide an automatic indication-of-direction signal that is received with an absolute accuracy of one degree, under static conditions, when the source of the signal is located directly off the ship’s bow;

  • (e) have a minimum sensitivity of two microvolts per metre;

  • (f) have an adjacent channel selectivity of more than 70 dB; and

  • (g) be fitted with an antenna that is

    • (i) located so as to minimize the reception of interfering signals originating from the ship on which it is installed, and

    • (ii) erected on top of other structures and in such a manner relative to nearby conductors or conductive surfaces as to satisfy the requirements of paragraphs (c) and (d).

Operation of Ship Stations

 A ship station shall be operated in accordance with the International Radio Regulations.

 Every ship shall have on board the number of radio operators that is required by the Crewing Regulations, and the radio operators shall hold the qualifications for operating a ship station prescribed in those Regulations.

 Except in a case of distress, no ship station shall radiate more power than the power required to ensure clear communication.

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2) and except in a case of distress, no person shall use a ship station on board a non-Canadian warship while the warship is lying in a Canadian harbour.

  • (2) The master of a non-Canadian warship may request permission to use a ship station on board the warship from the Senior Naval Officer at or near the harbour in which the ship is lying or, if there is no such officer or if that officer is not available, from a radio inspector.

  • (3) Permission requested under subsection (2) shall be granted if, in the request, the master states

    • (a) the frequencies to be used;

    • (b) the means of transmissions proposed;

    • (c) the times and duration of the proposed transmission of signals; and

    • (d) maximum power proposed to be used.

Signals and Alerts

  •  (1) The distress signal or distress alert prescribed by the International Radio Regulations shall be used when a ship or a person is in serious and imminent danger that calls for immediate assistance. This subsection does not prohibit any ship, survival craft or person in distress from using any other signal to make known their position and obtain help.

  • (2) The urgency signal or urgency alert prescribed by the International Radio Regulations shall be used when a ship other than a ship referred to in subsection (1) requires assistance or when there is reason to issue a warning that the ship may transmit a distress signal or distress alert at a later time.

  • (3) A person who has inadvertently transmitted a distress signal or distress alert from a ship, or after transmitting the signal or alert, determines that assistance is no longer required, shall immediately cancel that signal or alert in accordance with the instructions set out in the appendix to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.814(19) entitled Guidelines for the Avoidance of False Distress Alerts.

  • SOR/2006-291, s. 8(F)

Information Respecting Dangers to Navigation

 [Repealed, SOR/2005-137, s. 1]

Time

  •  (1) A person using a ship station shall, when stating the time during voice communications on a ship that is engaged on

    • (a) an international voyage, observe coordinated universal time (UTC);

    • (b) a voyage in the Great Lakes Basin, observe Eastern Standard Time; and

    • (c) any other type of voyage, observe the local time of the area in which the ship is navigating.

  • (2) A radio operator using a ship station shall, when stating the time, use the 24-hour system expressed by means of four figures from 00:01 to 24:00 followed by the time zone identifier.

Position Reporting

  •  (1) The master of a ship engaged on a voyage of more than 24 hours duration shall transmit voyage reports to AMVER, if the ship proceeds beyond

    • (a) the VHF coverage area and the MF coverage area;

    • (b) a sea area A1 and the MF coverage area; or

    • (c) the waters of

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of

    • (a) a fishing vessel engaged in fishing; or

    • (b) a government ship engaged in law enforcement duties.

Radio Log

  •  (1) A ship shall have on board a radio log in which the radio operator of the ship station records

    • (a) the following information in respect of the ship:

      • (i) its name,

      • (ii) its registration number,

      • (iii) its port of registry,

      • (iv) its gross tonnage,

      • (v) its radio call sign,

      • (vi) its maritime mobile service identity number, and

      • (vii) any other information serving to identify it;

    • (b) the period covered by the radio log;

    • (c) the time of each entry made in the radio log, stated in accordance with section 39;

    • (d) a summary of all radio communications, including the date, time, frequency used and details with respect to

      • (i) distress and urgency communications,

      • (ii) safety communications respecting the ship,

      • (iii) abnormal radio propagation conditions that may reduce the effectiveness of the ship station, and

      • (iv) any other important service incident;

    • (e) the names of the radio operators, the dates each operator is on board and the name of each certificate that each radio operator holds;

    • (f) the name of the radio operator designated for operating the radio equipment during emergencies as required by the Crewing Regulations;

    • (g) the date and time a check, test or inspection required by these Regulations was carried out and the results obtained including, for each day that the ship is at sea,

      • (i) the operating condition of the radio equipment determined by normal communication or a test call, as well as the position of the ship at the time the determination is made,

      • (ii) the assessment of the reserve source of energy, and

      • (iii) if any of the radio equipment is found not to be in working order, a notation that the master was informed;

    • (h) the position of the ship indicated in each voyage report transmitted to AMVER and the time that the ship was at the reported position;

    • (i) the time of an inadvertent transmission of a distress, urgency or safety communication and the time and method of its cancellation;

    • (j) the date, time and details of any significant maintenance carried out on the ship station, including the name of the person or the company that performed the maintenance tasks; and

    • (k) any corrective action taken to remedy any deficiency in the radio equipment required by these Regulations.

  • (2) The radio operator making an entry in a radio log shall initial the entry.

  • (3) The radio log shall be located at the main operating position of the ship station while the ship is at sea.

  • (4) The radio log shall be kept in its original form

    • (a) on board the ship for a period of not less than one month after the date of the last entry; and

    • (b) in a place accessible to a radio inspector for a minimum period of twelve months, which period includes the period referred to in paragraph (a).

Watches

  •  (1) A ship at sea that is equipped with any of the following types of radio equipment shall maintain a continuous watch in accordance with subsection 15(2), paragraph 17(b), subsection 19(2) and paragraph 22(1)(b) on the frequencies specifically assigned for the transmission of maritime safety information appropriate to the time of day, the position of the ship and the equipment carried:

    • (a) a VHF radio installation;

    • (b) an MF radio installation;

    • (c) an MF/HF radio installation;

    • (d) an INMARSAT ship earth station;

    • (e) a NAVTEX receiver;

    • (f) enhanced group call equipment; and

    • (g) radio equipment capable of transmitting and receiving communications using NBDP.

  • (2) A ship equipped with an MF/HF radio installation may keep the continuous watch by means of a scanning receiver.

 A ship shall keep a VHF radiotelephone watch in accordance with the VHF Practices and Procedures Regulations.

Reserve Source of Energy

  •  (1) On a passenger ship, a tow-boat or a ship of 20 m or more in length that is required to have a reserve source of energy under section 22 of the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, the reserve source of energy shall be capable of

    • (a) being used immediately in the event of a failure of the main source of electrical energy; and

    • (b) simultaneously operating

  • (2) The reserve source of energy shall have a capacity to provide electrical energy for

    • (a) one hour, if the radio equipment is provided with an emergency source of electrical power that meets the standards set out in TP 127 of the Department of Transport, entitled Ship Electrical Standards; and

    • (b) six hours, in any other case.

  • (3) The electrical capacity of the reserve source of energy under distress conditions shall, for the period prescribed in subsection (2), be equal to the aggregate of

    • (a) one half of the electrical capacity necessary for the transmission of communications,

    • (b) the electrical capacity necessary for the continuous reception of communications, and

    • (c) the electrical capacity necessary for the continuous operation of any additional radio equipment or lighting connected to that reserve source of energy.

  • (4) The reserve source of energy shall be independent of the propelling power of the ship and the ship’s electrical system.

  • (5) The reserve source of energy shall, for a period prescribed in subsection (2), be capable of simultaneously supplying energy

    • (a) to all ship stations and radio equipment that can be connected to the reserve source of energy at the same time; or

    • (b) if only one ship station or item of radio equipment can be connected to the reserve source of energy at the same time as a VHF radiotelephone, to the ship station or radio equipment that uses the most power.

  • (6) The reserve source of energy shall be used to supply the electrical lighting for a ship station or an item of radio equipment unless the electrical lighting has an independent source of energy that meets the minimum capacity requirements.

  •  (1) If the reserve source of energy consists of rechargeable batteries, a ship station shall have

    • (a) a means of recharging the batteries to the minimum capacity required within 10 hours; or

    • (b) for a ship that is less than 20 m in length, a reserve battery of a capacity sufficient for the duration of the voyage.

  • (2) Rechargeable batteries that constitute the reserve source of energy for a ship station shall be installed so that they

    • (a) are maintained at all times at the temperature specified by the manufacturer of the batteries; and

    • (b) provide, when fully charged, the minimum number of hours of operation required by subsection 44(2), regardless of meteorological conditions.

  • (3) If a ship station requires an uninterrupted input of data from the ship’s navigational receiver in order to function properly, the means to ensure the continuous input of the data shall be provided in the event of a failure of the ship’s main or emergency source of electrical energy.

Assessments and Tests

 A radio operator shall, before a ship undertakes a voyage, ensure that the radio equipment is in proper operating condition and that all documents and publications required by section 17 of the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations are on board the ship.

  •  (1) A radio operator shall, while a ship is at sea,

    • (a) daily, assess the operating condition of a ship station; and

    • (b) subject to subsection (2), in the case of a VHF radio installation, MF radio installation and MF/HF radio installation, weekly, assess, by the means of normal communications or by a test call carried out within the communication range of either a ship station or a coast station that is capable of transmitting and receiving communications using DSC, the operating condition of the radio installation.

  • (2) When, for longer than a week, a ship has been out of the communication range of a ship station or a coast station that is capable of transmitting and receiving communications using DSC, a radio operator shall make the test call at the first opportunity after the ship is within the communication range of a coast station in order to assess the operating condition of the radio installation.

  • (3) A radio operator shall, when testing the operating condition of a ship station transmitter, use the antenna normally used for the transmitter.

  • (4) If an assessment referred to in subsection (1) or (2) indicates that the radio equipment or the reserve source of energy is not operating properly, the equipment or source of energy shall be restored to its proper operating condition as soon as possible.

  • (5) If a ship station is out of service for more than 30 days, a radio operator shall verify, within the seven days before the ship undertakes a voyage, that the radio equipment is in proper operating condition and shall enter that information in the radio log.

  •  (1) The batteries that constitute a source of electrical energy for any radio equipment shall be

    • (a) tested daily, to determine the state of their charge;

    • (b) checked once each month, to determine the physical condition of the batteries, their connections and compartment; and

    • (c) fully recharged when necessary.

  • (2) Rechargeable batteries that constitute a reserve source of electrical energy for any radio equipment shall undergo

    • (a) unless the battery manufacturer advises otherwise, once a year, when a ship is not at sea, a check of their capacity by fully discharging and recharging them, using normal operating current and their battery rating period; and

    • (b) an assessment of their charge without any significant discharge of the batteries

      • (i) immediately before the ship puts to sea, and

      • (ii) each week, while the ship is at sea.

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 5(F)
  • SOR/2016-163, ss. 40, 41

Inspection and Certificates of Ship Stations

 A radio inspector may board a ship for the purpose of inspecting a ship station on board the ship, including any radio equipment, documentation and other equipment for the ship station.

  •  (1) The master of a ship, other than a Safety Convention ship, shall ensure that the ship station is inspected by a radio inspector

    • (a) within the 30 days before the ship puts to sea for the first time, if the ship is

      • (i) 20 m or more in length,

      • (ii) a tow-boat, or

      • (iii) carrying more than 12 passengers on a voyage any part of which is in a VHF coverage area or more than five miles from shore;

    • (b) at least once every 48 months, in the case of a ship referred to in paragraph (a) that is certified for home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II; and

    • (c) at least once every 12 months, in the case of a ship referred to in paragraph (a) that is certified for voyages other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II.

  • (2) The master of a ship that is required to be inspected under the Agreement between Canada and the United States of America for Promotion of Safety on the Great Lakes by Means of Radio, 1973 need not comply with paragraphs (1)(b) or (c), but shall ensure that the ship station is inspected by a radio inspector before the ship enters the Great Lakes Basin for the first time and at least once every 13 months thereafter while continuing to navigate in the Great Lakes Basin.

  • (3) The master of a Safety Convention ship shall ensure that the ship station is inspected by a radio inspector at the intervals provided for in the Safety Convention.

  • (4) If a radio inspection required by this section shows that a ship station meets the requirements of the Act, these Regulations and the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999, the radio inspector shall issue a radio inspection certificate and shall note as an endorsement on the certificate any substitution of equivalent standards permitted by the Board under subsection 305(2.1) of the Act.

  • (5) A radio inspection certificate is valid for

    • (a) 48 months, in the case of a ship referred to in paragraph (1)(b);

    • (b) 13 months, in the case of a ship referred to in subsection (2); or

    • (c) 12 months, in any other case.

  • SOR/2003-386, s. 4

Repeal

 [Repeal]

Coming into Force

 These Regulations come into force on April 1, 2001.

Date modified: