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Navigation Safety Regulations (SOR/2005-134)

Regulations are current to 2019-06-20 and last amended on 2019-06-15. Previous Versions

Navigation Safety Regulations

SOR/2005-134

ARCTIC WATERS POLLUTION PREVENTION ACT

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Registration 2005-05-10

Navigation Safety Regulations

P.C. 2005-807 2005-05-10

Whereas, pursuant to subsection 562.12(1)Footnote a of the Canada Shipping Act, a copy of the proposed Navigation Safety Regulations, substantially in the annexed form, was published in the Canada Gazette, Part I, on March 27, 2004, and a reasonable opportunity was thereby afforded to ship owners, masters, seamen and other interested persons to make representations to the Minister of Transport with respect to the proposed Regulations;

Therefore, Her Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of Transport, pursuant to section 314Footnote b, subsection 338(1)Footnote c, section 339Footnote d and paragraphs 562.1(1)(c)Footnote a and 657(1)(b)Footnote e of the Canada Shipping Act and subparagraph 12(1)(a)(ii) of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act, hereby makes the annexed Navigation Safety Regulations.

Interpretation

  •  (1) The following definitions apply in these Regulations.

    Act

    Act means the Canada Shipping Act. (Loi)

    bulk carrier

    bulk carrier means a ship that is registered under the Act as a bulk carrier. (vraquier)

    chemical carrier

    chemical carrier means a ship that is specially constructed or adapted for the carriage of dangerous chemicals and is engaged in the carriage of those chemicals. (transporteur de produits chimiques)

    competent authority

    competent authority means

    • (a) a government that is a party to the Safety Convention;

    • (b) a society or association for the classification and registry of ships recognized by a government referred to in paragraph (a); and

    • (c) a testing establishment recognized by the Minister or by a government referred to in paragraph (a) as able to determine whether equipment meets applicable standards specified in Schedule 1 or to perform audits of quality control systems, as the case may be. (autorité compétente)

    company

    company

    • (a) in respect of a Canadian ship, means its authorized representative; and

    • (b) in respect of any other ship, has the meaning assigned by Regulation 1 of Chapter IX of the Safety Convention. (compagnie)

    gas carrier

    gas carrier means a cargo ship that was constructed or adapted, and that is used, for the carriage in bulk of any liquefied gas or other products listed in Chapter 19 of the International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk, published by the IMO. (transporteur de gaz)

    IMO

    IMO means the International Maritime Organization. (OMI)

    inspector

    inspector means a steamship inspector appointed under section 301 of the Act or a person, classification society or other organization authorized under section 317.1 of the Act to conduct inspections. (inspecteur)

    length

    length, with respect to a ship, means its overall length. (longueur)

    Minister

    Minister means the Minister of Transport. (ministre)

    registered

    registered means registered or listed under Part I of the Act. (immatriculé)

    shipping safety control zone

    shipping safety control zone means an area of the arctic waters prescribed as a shipping safety control zone in section 3 of the Shipping Safety Control Zones Order. (zone de contrôle de la sécurité de la navigation)

    tanker

    tanker means a ship the greater part of whose cargo space is constructed or adapted for the carriage of liquid cargoes and that is carrying as cargo a pollutant as defined in Part XV of the Act or waste as defined in section 2 of the Arctic Waters Pollution Prevention Act. (navire-citerne)

    tons

    tons means tons gross tonnage. (tonneaux)

    tow-boat

    tow-boat means a ship engaged in towing another ship or a floating object astern or alongside or in pushing another ship or a floating object ahead. (bâtiment remorqueur)

  • (2) A reference to a class of home-trade, inland or minor waters voyage is a reference to that class as defined in the Home-Trade, Inland and Minor Waters Voyages Regulations.

  • (3) A rigidly connected composite unit of a pushing vessel and pushed vessel, when designed as a dedicated and integrated tug-and-barge combination, is regarded as a single ship for the purpose of these Regulations.

  • (4) Unless otherwise indicated in these Regulations, any reference in these Regulations to a document is a reference to the document as amended from time to time.

  • (5) For the purpose of interpreting a document incorporated by reference into these Regulations, “should” shall be read to mean “shall” and recommendations are mandatory.

  • (6) For the purpose of these Regulations, a ship is constructed

    • (a) on the earliest of

      • (i) the day on which its keel is laid,

      • (ii) the day on which construction identifiable with a specific ship begins, and

      • (iii) the day on which the assembly of the ship has reached the lesser of 50 tonnes and 1% of the estimated mass of all structural material of the ship; or

    • (b) if it was registered, listed or otherwise recorded in a foreign state, on the day on which it is first registered or listed as a Canadian ship or recorded as a ship being built in Canada.

  • (7) A reference in these Regulations to an incorporated document shall, except insofar as these Regulations apply to ships to which Chapter V of the Safety Convention applies, be interpreted as excluding the phrases “to the satisfaction of the Administration” and “satisfactory to the Administration”.

  • (8) A ship that operates solely on the Great Lakes, the St. Lawrence River and their connecting and tributary waters as far east as the lower exit of the St. Lambert Lock at Montréal is not considered to be engaged on an international voyage for the purpose of these Regulations.

PART 1General

Application

  •  (1) Sections 4 to 89 apply to every ship that is

    • (a) a Canadian ship in any waters; or

    • (b) a non-Canadian ship that is

      • (i) navigating in Canadian waters or a shipping safety control zone, or

      • (ii) engaged in the coasting trade as defined in subsection 2(1) of the Coasting Trade Act.

  • (2) Sections 6 to 89, except for sections 74, 76 and 77, do not apply to

    • (a) a ship to which section 3 applies; or

    • (b) a non-Canadian ship that is a fishing vessel that complies with Chapter X of the Torremolinos International Convention for the Safety of Fishing Vessels, 1977, as modified by the Torremolinos Protocol of 1993, and with any measures the government of the state whose flag the ship is entitled to fly takes under that Chapter.

  • SOR/2017-286, s. 29

Safety Convention

 Every non-Canadian ship to which Chapter V of the Safety Convention applies that is in Canadian waters or a shipping safety control zone shall comply with that Chapter and with any measures the government of the state whose flag the ship is entitled to fly takes under that Chapter.

Compliance

  •  (1) Every company shall ensure that sections 5 to 16 and 18 to 81, subsections 83(1) and (3) and sections 84 to 89 are complied with in respect of its ships.

  • (2) Unless under force majeure or to save life or property, no master shall make any voyage if the ship is not fitted with the equipment required by these Regulations.

  • (3) If any equipment required by these Regulations to be on a ship ceases to be in effective operating condition, the master shall restore the equipment to an effective operating condition as soon as feasible. If the ship is in a port where repair facilities are not readily available, the master shall make suitable arrangements to take into account the inoperative equipment in planning and executing a safe voyage to a port where repairs can be made.

Prohibition

 No ship shall navigate in a shipping safety control zone unless the ship complies with these Regulations.

Principles Relating to Bridge Design, Design and Arrangement of Navigational Equipment and Bridge Procedures

  •  (1) On every ship of 150 tons or more engaged on an international voyage and on every ship of 500 tons or more engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, all decisions that concern navigational equipment, navigational visibility, steering gear, equipment relating to charts and nautical publications and records of navigational activities, and that affect bridge design, the design and arrangement of navigational equipment on the bridge and bridge procedures, shall be made with the aim of

    • (a) facilitating the tasks to be performed by the bridge team and the pilot in making a full appraisal of the situation and in navigating the ship safely under all operational conditions;

    • (b) promoting effective and safe bridge resource management;

    • (c) enabling the bridge team and the pilot to have convenient and continuous access to essential information presented in a clear and unambiguous manner, using standardized symbols and coding systems for controls and displays;

    • (d) indicating the operational status of automated functions and integrated components, systems and sub-systems;

    • (e) allowing for expeditious, continuous and effective information processing and decision making by the bridge team and the pilot;

    • (f) preventing or minimizing excessive or unnecessary work and any conditions or distractions on the bridge that could cause fatigue or interfere with the vigilance of the bridge team and the pilot; and

    • (g) minimizing the risk of human error and detecting any human error that occurs, through the use of monitoring and alarm systems, in time for the bridge team and the pilot to take appropriate action.

  • (2) The decisions shall be made only after the following guidelines and standards are taken into account:

    • (a) IMO MSC/Circ.982, Guidelines on Ergonomic Criteria for Bridge Equipment and Layout;

    • (b) if the ship is fitted with an integrated bridge system, IMO Resolution MSC.64(67), Annex 1, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Integrated Bridge Systems (IBS); and

    • (c) if the ship is fitted with an integrated navigation system, IMO Resolution MSC.86(70), Annex 3, Recommendation on Performance Standards for an Integrated Navigation System (INS).

Installation, Testing and Maintenance of Equipment

  •  (1) The equipment referred to in these Regulations shall be installed, tested and maintained so as to minimize malfunction.

  • (2) All reasonable steps shall be taken to maintain the equipment in good working order.

  • (3) Every Canadian ship of 150 tons or more engaged on an international voyage and every Canadian ship of 500 tons or more shall retain on board a maintenance record for the equipment that shows all periodic testing and servicing, all defects, repairs and parts replacements and the relevant dates, locations and personnel.

  •  (1) Every ship making a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, shall carry

    • (a) the manufacturer’s operating and maintenance manuals for the equipment referred to in these Regulations; and

    • (b) the spare parts that the manufacturer or the operating and maintenance manuals recommend be carried.

  • (2) Every ship making a voyage, other than a voyage referred to in subsection (1), shall carry the manufacturer’s operating and maintenance manuals for the equipment referred to in these Regulations and the spare parts, fuses and lamps that can be used as replacement parts for installation by non-technical personnel.

 [Repealed, SOR/2011-203, s. 12]

Electromagnetic Compatibility

  •  (1) This section applies to every ship of 150 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage and every ship of 500 tons or more.

  • (2) If a ship is constructed on or after July 1, 2002, all electrical and electronic equipment on the bridge or in the vicinity of the bridge shall be tested for electromagnetic compatibility, taking into account testing standard IEC 60533 of the International Electrotechnical Commission, entitled Electrical and electronic installations in ships — Electromagnetic compatibility.

  • (3) Electrical or electronic equipment that is installed after the coming into force of these Regulations shall be installed so that electromagnetic interference does not affect the proper functioning of navigational equipment.

  • (4) Portable electrical or electronic equipment shall not be operated on the bridge if it might affect the proper functioning of navigational equipment.

Standards

  •  (1) The equipment with which a ship of 150 tons or more is fitted to comply with these Regulations shall, if performance standards are specified in Schedule 1 for the equipment, meet those standards or other performance standards that the Minister determines provide a level of safety that is equivalent to or higher than that of those standards.

  • (2) If standards are specified in Schedule 1 for the equipment,

    • (a) the equipment shall be type-approved by a competent authority as meeting those standards or other standards that the Minister determines provide a level of safety that is equivalent to or higher than that of those standards; and

    • (b) proof of the type-approval shall be carried on board the ship.

  • (3) The proof shall be in the form of either of the following that is issued by the competent authority:

    • (a) a label that is securely affixed to the equipment in a readily visible location; or

    • (b) a document that is kept in a readily accessible location on the ship.

  • (4) If the proof is issued in a language other than English or French, it shall be accompanied by an English or French translation.

  • (5) The equipment with which a Canadian ship is fitted to comply with these Regulations shall meet the applicable electrical installation standards in sections 3.10, 3.12, 3.14, 4.1, 4.3, 4.4, 15.6, 15.7, 15.11.2, 15.11.3, 52.1 to 52.4, 54.2 to 54.4 and 58.1 to 58.3 of Ship Electrical Standards, TP 127, published by the Department of Transport.

  • (6) Subsections (1) to (5) do not apply to equipment with which a ship was required to be fitted before July 1, 2002 in accordance with the standards required by the Navigating Appliances and Equipment Regulations, SOR/84-689, as they read on June 30, 2002, if the ship was fitted with the equipment before July 1, 2002 and the equipment continues to meet those standards and has the proof of compliance required by those Regulations as they read on that date.

  • (7) Despite subsection (6), if equipment that was fitted on a ship before July 1, 2002 is replaced, subsections (1) to (5) apply to the replacement equipment.

Quality Control

 Equipment that is fitted on a ship on or after July 1, 2002 and required to be type-approved under paragraph 11(2)(a) shall

  • (a) be manufactured by a manufacturer that has a quality control system in place that is audited by a competent authority to ensure continuous compliance with the type-approval conditions; or

  • (b) before being fitted on a ship, be certified as being in compliance with the type-approval by a competent authority that has used final product verification procedures.

Alternative Modes of Operation

 Equipment that is referred to in these Regulations, that is fitted on a ship on or after July 1, 2002 and that offers alternative modes of operation shall indicate the actual mode of use.

Equipment Not Required to Be Fitted

 Insofar as it is feasible, section 11 applies in respect of equipment for which performance standards are specified in Schedule 1, that is fitted on or after July 1, 2002 on a ship of 150 tons or more engaged on an international voyage or on a ship of 500 tons or more engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage and that is in addition to the equipment required by these Regulations.

 Section 11 applies in respect of heading or track control systems, or other means, that can be used to automatically control, and keep to, a heading or straight track and that are fitted on a ship of over 1000 tons.

Integrated Systems

  •  (1) Integrated bridge systems that are fitted on a ship on or after July 1, 2002 shall be so arranged that failure of any sub-system is brought to the immediate attention of the person in charge of the deck watch by audible and visual alarms and does not cause the failure of any other sub-system.

  • (2) In the case of a failure in one part of an integrated navigational system, it shall be possible to operate each other individual piece of equipment or part of the system separately.

Compass Inspections

 During the inspection of the compasses on a ship that is not a pleasure craft, the master shall

  • (a) show the inspector a certificate of adjustment substantially in the form set out in Schedule 2, signed by a compass adjuster, or a deviation card signed and dated by a compass adjuster; or

  • (b) if the master has found the compasses to be satisfactory to provide heading direction, give the inspector a statement signed by the master and first mate to that effect.

PART 2Equipment Requirements for Ships Constructed Before July 1, 2002

Application

 This Part applies to ships constructed before July 1, 2002.

Magnetic Compasses

  •  (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), every ship engaged on a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with

    • (a) a standard magnetic compass that provides clear, readable heading information at the main steering position to the person at the helm; or

    • (b) a standard magnetic compass and a steering magnetic compass.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to the following ships if a steering magnetic compass is installed on the ship together with a device for taking azimuths and terrestrial bearings over an arc of the horizon as close as feasible to 360°:

    • (a) fishing vessels of less than 500 tons that were constructed before January 1, 1975 and are less than 45 m in length; and

    • (b) ships of 150 tons or less.

  • (3) A ship that is required by this Part to be fitted with a standard magnetic compass may instead be fitted with a gyro-compass if the ship is fitted with

    • (a) a steering magnetic compass; and

    • (b) a device for taking azimuths and terrestrial bearings over an arc of the horizon as close as feasible to 360°.

 Every ship on which a standard magnetic compass is fitted as required by paragraph 19(1)(a) shall be fitted with a spare magnetic compass that is fully interchangeable with the standard magnetic compass.

 The compasses required by paragraph 19(1)(b) shall

  • (a) if fitted on a ship that was constructed on or after January 16, 1973, be fully interchangeable; or

  • (b) if fitted on a ship that was constructed before January 16, 1973, be fully interchangeable when one or both of the compasses are replaced.

 Every ship on which a standard magnetic compass is fitted as required by subsection 19(1) shall be fitted with a means of communication between the standard magnetic compass position and the position from which the ship is normally navigated.

 Every standard magnetic compass required to be fitted on a ship under subsection 19(1) shall be equipped with a device for taking azimuths and terrestrial bearings over an arc of the horizon as close as feasible to 360°.

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), every ship engaged on a voyage other than a voyage referred to in subsection 19(1) shall be fitted with a steering magnetic compass.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to

    • (a) a ship of eight metres or less in length that is navigated within sight of navigation marks; or

    • (b) a cable ferry.

 Every magnetic compass required to be fitted on a ship by this Part shall

  • (a) be properly adjusted; and

  • (b) have its table or curve of residual deviations available for inspection on the ship at all times, except in the case of a magnetic compass required to be fitted on a pleasure craft of less than 150 tons.

Gyro-compasses and Gyro Repeaters

  •  (1) A ship shall be fitted with a gyro-compass if

    • (a) it is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage and

      • (i) is of 1600 tons or more and was constructed before September 1, 1984, or

      • (ii) is of 500 tons or more and was constructed on or after September 1, 1984; or

    • (b) it is of 500 tons or more and engaged on a voyage

      • (i) that is north of the sixtieth parallel of north latitude and is a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, or

      • (ii) that is an inland voyage, Class I.

  • (2) Every ship of 1600 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage and every ship of 1600 tons or more that was constructed before September 1, 1984 and is engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with one or more gyro repeaters that are placed so that bearings can be taken over an arc of the horizon as close as feasible to 360°.

  • (3) Every gyro-compass and every gyro repeater located at the main steering position of a ship shall provide the person at the helm with clear, readable heading information.

Heading Information at the Emergency Steering Position

 Every ship of 150 tons or more that is required by this Part to be fitted with a compass shall be provided with heading information at the emergency steering position if that position is provided.

Navigational Radars

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), a ship shall be fitted with a navigational radar if

    • (a) it is of 500 tons or more and was constructed before September 1, 1984; or

    • (b) it is of 200 tons or more and was constructed on or after September 1, 1984.

  • (2) A ship shall be fitted with two navigational radars if

    • (a) it is of 10 000 tons or more; or

    • (b) it is a tanker, gas carrier or chemical carrier of 1600 tons or more.

  • (3) Every Safety Convention ship and every ship referred to in subsection (1) on which a navigational radar is fitted after March 1, 2001 shall be fitted with a navigational radar that is capable of operating in the 9-GHz frequency band.

  •  (1) When two navigational radars are fitted on a ship, each radar shall be capable of being operated independently of the other.

  • (2) When two navigational radars are fitted on a Safety Convention ship or are fitted, after March 1, 2001, on a ship referred to in subsection 28(2), at least one of the radars shall be capable of operating in the 9-GHz frequency band.

Radar Plotting Facilities

  •  (1) Every navigational radar required by this Part shall be provided with facilities for plotting at or close to each radar display.

  • (2) The plotting facilities for every radar fitted after September 1, 1984 on ships of 1600 tons or more shall be at least as effective as a reflection plotter.

Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPAs)

  •  (1) A ship that is making a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with an automatic radar plotting aid if

    • (a) it is a tanker of 10 000 tons or more;

    • (b) it is a ship of 15 000 tons or more that was constructed before September 1, 1984; or

    • (c) it is a ship of 10 000 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984.

  • (2) Every ship of 10 000 tons or more that is carrying oil or liquid hazardous materials in bulk and is making a voyage on the inland waters of Canada shall be fitted with an automatic radar plotting aid.

  • (3) Subsection (1) does not apply to a bulk carrier making a home-trade voyage, Class II, in Canada, if

    • (a) it is limited, by its inspection certificate, to making inland voyages and home-trade voyages, Class II, in Canada; and

    • (b) during the period for which the inspection certificate is in force, it spends more time on inland voyages than on home-trade voyages, Class II, in Canada.

Echo-sounding Equipment

 A ship shall be fitted with echo-sounding equipment if

  • (a) it is of 300 tons or more, was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage;

  • (b) it is of 500 tons or more, was constructed on or after January 16, 1973 and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage;

  • (c) it is of 1600 tons or more, was constructed before January 16, 1973 and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I;

  • (d) it is of 1600 tons or more and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (e) it is of 15 000 tons or more.

 Every ship of 500 tons or more that is engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall, unless it is fitted with echo-sounding equipment, be fitted with an efficient mechanical depth-sounding device operated by means of a lead and line.

Devices to Indicate Speed and Distance

 Every ship of 500 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and is engaged on a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, and every ship required by section 31 to be fitted with an automatic radar plotting aid shall be fitted with a speed-and-distance measuring device to indicate speed and distance travelled through the water.

 Every Canadian ship of 50 000 tons or more that is engaged on a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with a device capable of indicating the rate of speed over the ground in all circumstances, including at low speed and in shallow water.

Rate-of-Turn Indicators

 Every ship of 100 000 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and is engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with a rate-of-turn indicator.

Manoeuvring Indicators

  •  (1) Every ship of 1600 tons or more that was constructed before September 1, 1984, every ship of 500 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and every Canadian ship of 200 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with indicators that show the rudder angle, the rate of revolution of each propeller and, if fitted with variable-pitch propellers or lateral-thrust propellers, the pitch and operational mode of those propellers.

  • (2) Every Canadian ship of 100 tons or more but less than 1600 tons shall be fitted with an indicator that shows the angular position of the rudder.

  • (3) Every Canadian ship of 500 tons or more but less than 1600 tons shall be fitted with an indicator that shows the operational mode of the propelling machinery.

  • (4) The indicators shall be readable from the conning position.

Signalling Lamps

 Every ship of more than 150 tons that is engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with a daylight signalling lamp capable of being operated independently of the ship’s main power supply.

PART 3Equipment Requirements for Ships Constructed on or After July 1, 2002

Application

 This Part applies to ships constructed on or after July 1, 2002.

General Equipment Requirements

  •  (1) Every ship shall be fitted with a properly adjusted standard magnetic compass, or other means, independent of any power supply, that can be used to determine the ship’s heading and display it at the main steering position.

  • (2) A ship may be fitted with a properly adjusted steering magnetic compass instead of the standard magnetic compass if

    • (a) it is of less than 150 tons; or

    • (b) it is of less than 500 tons and is engaged on a voyage that is not

      • (i) an international voyage, or

      • (ii) a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class II.

  • (3) A ship that is required to be fitted with a standard magnetic compass may instead be fitted with a gyro compass and a properly adjusted steering magnetic compass if

    • (a) it is of less than 150 tons and engaged on an international voyage; or

    • (b) it is of less than 500 tons and is not engaged on an international voyage.

  • (4) This section does not apply to

    • (a) a ship of eight metres or less in length that is navigated within sight of navigation marks; or

    • (b) a cable ferry.

 Every ship of 150 tons or more or that is engaged on a voyage that is beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III or an inland voyage, Class II, shall be fitted with a pelorus or compass bearing device, or other means, independent of any power supply, that can be used to take bearings over an arc of the horizon of 360°.

 Every ship, other than a pleasure craft of less than 150 tons, that is required by this Part to be fitted with a magnetic compass shall be fitted with a means of correcting heading and bearings to true at all times.

 Every ship that has a totally enclosed bridge shall be fitted with a sound-reception system, or other means, that can be used to enable the person in charge of the deck watch to hear sound signals and determine their direction.

  •  (1) Every ship with an emergency steering position shall be fitted with a telephone, or other means, that can be used to communicate heading information to that position.

  • (2) Every ship on which a standard magnetic compass is fitted under subsection 40(1) shall be fitted with a means of communication between the standard magnetic compass position and the position from which the ship is normally navigated.

Equipment for Ships of 150 Tons or More

  •  (1) Every ship of 150 tons or more shall be fitted with a spare magnetic compass that is interchangeable with the magnetic compass required by section 40.

  • (2) Every ship of 150 tons or more that is fitted with other means under subsection 40(1) shall be fitted with replacement or duplicate equipment that can be used to determine the ship’s heading and display it at the main steering position.

 Every ship of 150 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with a daylight signalling lamp, or other means, that can be used to communicate by light signals during the day and the night using a source of electrical power not solely dependent on the ship’s power supply.

Equipment for Ships of 150 Tons or More Carrying More Than 12 Passengers and Engaged on an International Voyage and for Ships of 300 Tons or More

 A ship shall be fitted with echo-sounding equipment, or other electronic means, that can be used to measure and display the available depth of water if

  • (a) it is of 150 tons or more, carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (b) it is of 300 tons or more.

 A ship shall be fitted with a 9-GHz radar, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of radar transponders and of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance if

  • (a) it is of 150 tons or more, carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (b) it is of 300 tons or more.

 A ship shall be fitted with an electronic plotting aid, or other means, that can be used to electronically plot the range and bearing of targets in order to determine collision risk if

  • (a) it is of 150 tons or more, carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (b) it is of 300 tons or more but less than 500 tons.

 A ship shall be fitted with a speed-and-distance measuring device, or other means, that can be used to indicate speed and distance travelled through the water if

  • (a) it is of 150 tons or more, carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (b) it is of 300 tons or more and engaged on an international voyage or a voyage that is not a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage.

 A ship shall be fitted with a properly adjusted transmitting heading device, or other means, that can be used to transmit heading information for input to the equipment referred to in sections 48, 49 and 65 if

  • (a) it is of 150 tons or more but less than 500 tons, carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage; or

  • (b) it is of 300 tons or more but less than 500 tons.

Equipment for Ships of 500 Tons or More

  •  (1) Every ship of 500 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage or a voyage that is not a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage shall be fitted with

    • (a) a gyro-compass, or other means, that can be used to determine and display its heading by shipborne non-magnetic means and to transmit heading information for input to the equipment referred in sections 48, 54 and 65; and

    • (b) a gyro-compass heading repeater, or other means, that can be used to visually supply heading information at the emergency steering position, if applicable.

  • (2) Every ship of 500 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage or a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage shall be fitted with a gyro-compass bearing repeater, or other means, that can be used to take bearings over an arc of the horizon of 360º, using the gyro-compass or other means referred to in paragraph (1)(a). However, if the ship is of less than 1600 tons, it shall be fitted with a gyro-compass bearing repeater, or other means, placed so that bearings can be taken over an arc of the horizon as close as feasible to 360º.

 Every ship of 500 tons or more shall be fitted with rudder, propeller, thrust, pitch and operational mode indicators, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the rudder angle, propeller revolutions, the force and direction of thrust and, if applicable, the force and direction of lateral thrust and the pitch and operational mode of the propellers. All of that information shall be readable from the conning position.

 Every ship of 500 tons or more shall be fitted with an automatic tracking aid, or other means, that can be used to automatically plot the range and bearing of targets in order to determine collision risk.

 Every ship of 500 tons or more that is engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I, II or III, shall be fitted with a daylight signalling lamp, or other means, that can be used to communicate by light signals during the day and the night using a source of electrical power not solely dependent on the ship’s power supply.

 On every ship of 500 tons or more, the failure of one piece of equipment shall not reduce the capability of the ship to meet the requirements of sections 38 and 39.

Equipment for Ships of 3000 Tons or More

 Every ship of 3000 tons or more shall be fitted with a 3-GHz or 9-GHz radar, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks in order to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance. The 3-GHz or 9-GHz radar or other means shall be in addition to and functionally independent of the radar or other means fitted on the ship under section 48.

 Every ship of 3000 tons or more but less than 10 000 tons shall be fitted with a second automatic tracking aid, or other means, that can be used to automatically plot the range and bearing of targets in order to determine collision risk. The second automatic tracking aid or other means shall be in addition to and functionally independent of the automatic tracking aid or other means fitted on the ship under section 54.

Equipment for Ships of 10 000 Tons or More

 Every ship of 10 000 tons or more shall be fitted with an automatic radar plotting aid, or other means, that can be used to automatically plot the range and bearing of at least 20 targets. The automatic radar plotting aid or other means shall be connected to a device that can be used to indicate speed and distance travelled through the water in order to determine collision risks and simulate a trial manoeuvre.

 Every ship of 10 000 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage or a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage shall be fitted with a heading or track control system, or other means, that can be used to automatically control, and keep to, a heading or straight track.

Equipment for Ships of 50 000 Tons or More

 Every ship of 50 000 tons or more shall be fitted with a rate-of-turn indicator, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the rate of turn.

 Every ship of 50 000 tons or more shall be fitted with a speed-and-distance measuring device, or other means, that can be used to indicate the speed and distance over the ground in the forward and athwartships direction.

PART 4Additional Equipment Requirements

Receivers for Global Navigation Satellite Systems and Terrestrial Radionavigation Systems

  •  (1) Every ship that is required by the Ship Station (Radio) Regulations, 1999 to be equipped with a VHF radio installation capable of digital selective calling (DSC) and every ship of 150 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage or a voyage other than a minor waters voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class IV, shall be fitted with a receiver for a global navigation satellite system or a terrestrial radionavigation system, or other means, that can be used at all times throughout the intended voyage to establish and update the ship’s position by automatic means.

  • (2) If the ship is of less than 150 tons, the receiver may be integral to the VHF radio installation capable of DSC.

Radars

  •  (1) Every Canadian ship of 200 tons or more but less than 300 tons that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with a radar, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of radar transponders and of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance.

  • (2) The radar shall

    • (a) be a 9-GHz radar if the ship is a Safety Convention ship or if the radar was fitted on the ship after March 1, 2001; and

    • (b) be provided with facilities for plotting at or close to each radar display and, if the ship is of 1600 tons or more, be at least as effective as a reflection plotter.

Automatic Identification Systems (AISs)

  •  (1) Every vessel of 150 gross tonnage or more that is carrying more than 12 passengers and engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an Automatic Identification System (AIS) Class A.

  • (2) Every vessel, other than a fishing vessel, of 300 gross tonnage or more that is engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A.

  • (3) Every vessel, other than a fishing vessel, of 500 gross tonnage or more that is not engaged on an international voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A.

  • (4) Every vessel, other than a vessel subject to subsections (1) to (3), that is engaged on a voyage other than a sheltered waters voyage shall be fitted with an AIS Class A that meets the standards specified at item 15 of Schedule 1 or an AIS Class B if

    • (a) the vessel is certified to carry more than 12 passengers; or

    • (b) the vessel is eight metres or more in length and is carrying passengers.

  • (5) The AIS shall

    • (a) automatically provide information, including the vessel’s identity, type, position, course, speed and other safety-related information, to appropriately equipped shore stations, other vessels and aircraft;

    • (b) automatically receive such information from similarly fitted vessels;

    • (c) monitor and track vessels; and

    • (d) exchange data with shore-based facilities.

  • (6) The AIS Class A shall be operated taking into account the annex to IMO Resolution A.917(22), Guidelines for the Onboard Operational Use of Shipborne Automatic Identification Systems (AIS).

  • (7) The AIS Class B shall meet one of the following standards of the International Electrotechnical Commission:

    • (a) IEC 62287-1: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Class B shipborne equipment of the automatic identification system (AIS) — Part 1: Carrier-sense time division multiple access (CSTDMA) techniques; or

    • (b) IEC 62287-2: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Class B shipborne equipment of the automatic identification system (AIS) — Part 2: Self-organising time division multiple access (SOTDMA) techniques.

  • (8) Every vessel fitted with an AIS shall maintain it in operation at all times.

  • (9) Subsections (5) and (8) do not apply

    • (a) where international agreements, rules or standards provide for the protection of navigational information; or

    • (b) in respect of vessels, other than vessels operated for a commercial purpose, owned or operated by Her Majesty in right of Canada or by a foreign government that is a party to the Safety Convention.

  • (10) For the purposes of subsection (4), sheltered waters voyage has the same meaning as in section 1 of the Vessel Certificates Regulations.

  • (11) For the purposes of section 51 and paragraph 52(1)(a), an AIS Class B is not considered to be equipment referred to in this section.

  • SOR/2019-100, s. 1

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

 [Repealed, SOR/2017-286, s. 30]

Tow-boats

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship and is making a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with a gyro-compass, or other means, that can be used to determine and display its heading by shipborne non-magnetic means.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship shall be fitted with

  • (a) one radar, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance, if the tow-boat is of five tons or more and engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, an inland voyage, Class I or II, or a minor waters voyage, Class I; and

  • (b) two radars, or other means, that can be used to determine and display the range and bearing of other surface craft, obstructions, buoys, shorelines and navigational marks to assist in navigation and in collision avoidance, if the tow-boat is of five tons or more and engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship and is engaged on a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with echo-sounding equipment, or other electronic means, that can be used to measure and display the available depth of water.

 Every tow-boat that is a Canadian ship, is not a Safety Convention ship and is engaged in a towing operation outside the waters in which it normally operates is not required to meet any additional equipment requirements for the area outside the waters in which it normally operates if

  • (a) one of the ships engaged in the towing operation with the tow-boat is fitted with the equipment required by these Regulations for the voyage; or

  • (b) the towing operation is being undertaken in an emergency.

 [Repealed, SOR/2011-203, s. 13]

Pilot Transfer Equipment and Arrangements

  •  (1) Every ship engaged on a voyage in the course of which a pilot is likely to be employed shall be provided with pilot transfer equipment and arrangements in accordance with Regulation 23 of Chapter V of the Safety Convention.

  • (2) For the purposes of subsection (1), the reference to “Administration” in subsection 6.1 of Regulation 23 of Chapter V of the Safety Convention shall be read as “competent authority”.

  • (3) Pilot transfer equipment and arrangements with which a ship is provided shall meet the requirements of the annex to IMO Resolution A.889(21), Pilot Transfer Arrangements.

  • (4) Despite subsection (1), in the case of a Canadian ship in the waters of the Great Lakes or St. Lawrence River, if the distance from the water to the point of access of the ship is more than five metres, the ship shall provide an accommodation ladder, or other equipment that provides equally safe and convenient access to and egress from the ship, so that the climb on the pilot ladder does not exceed five metres.

Internal Communication Systems

  •  (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), every Canadian ship of 200 tons or more that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984 and every Canadian ship of 1600 tons or more that was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with a voice communication system that includes receiving and transmitting stations, suitable for use in normal ambient noise conditions,

    • (a) at the principal conning position;

    • (b) at a position close to the main engine controls in the engine room;

    • (c) at the forward and after mooring positions;

    • (d) at the emergency steering position;

    • (e) at the steering gear compartment if the ship is a tanker, chemical carrier or gas carrier of 10 000 tons or more;

    • (f) in every radio room; and

    • (g) if such accommodation is provided, in

      • (i) the master’s accommodation,

      • (ii) the chief engineer’s accommodation, and

      • (iii) every radio operator’s accommodation, unless it is adjacent to the radio room.

  • (2) A portable receiving and transmitting voice communication system may be substituted for the system required by paragraph (1)(c) if it provides effective voice communication between the principal conning position and the forward and after mooring positions.

  • (3) On a Canadian ship of less than 1600 tons, the receiving and transmitting stations described in subsection (1) are not required if effective voice communications can be maintained in the ambient noise conditions.

  • (4) The receiving and transmitting stations required at the positions described in paragraphs (1)(a), (b) and (e) shall be capable of being operated independently of the ship’s main electrical energy supply for at least 12 hours.

  • (5) Every Canadian ship of less than 1600 tons that was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be provided with efficient means of voice communications

    • (a) between the principal conning position and the machinery space; and

    • (b) between the principal conning position and the forward and after mooring positions.

Searchlights

  •  (1) A ship shall be fitted with two searchlights if

    • (a) it is of more than five tons and is usually used for the purpose of pushing or pulling a floating object;

    • (b) it is a fishing vessel of more than 24 m in length and more than 150 tons that was constructed on or after September 1, 1984; or

    • (c) it is a Canadian ship of more than 150 tons that is navigating in ice that might cause damage that renders the ship unseaworthy.

  • (2) Every fishing vessel of more than 150 tons that is more than 24 m in length and was constructed before September 1, 1984 shall be fitted with at least one searchlight.

  • (3) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply to a ship that, when used for pulling or pushing any floating object, is so used only to salvage logs.

  •  (1) The searchlights required by subsection 76(1) shall be securely mounted in a position that will allow

    • (a) one searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° from bow to stern on the port side;

    • (b) one searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° from bow to stern on the starboard side; and

    • (c) each searchlight to sweep the entire arc of 180° forward of the beam.

  • (2) Each searchlight required by section 76 shall be provided with

    • (a) an exclusive electrical circuit connected to the main or emergency switchboard; and

    • (b) subject to subsection (3), two spare lamps and any spare electrical equipment for the searchlight that might be required for replacement under normal service conditions.

  • (3) If both searchlights required by subsection 76(1) are of the same type, only two spare lamps and any spare electrical equipment for one searchlight that might be required for replacement under normal service conditions need be carried on the ship.

Navigating Accessories

 Every ship that is required by the Charts and Nautical Publications Regulations, 1995 to carry charts and nautical publications shall be fitted with

  • (a) the navigating accessories necessary to permit the proper use of the charts so as to precisely determine the position of the ship;

  • (b) the navigating accessories necessary to determine the accuracy of compass readings; and

  • (c) at least one pair of binoculars.

Signalling Flags

  •  (1) Every Canadian ship of more than 150 tons making a foreign voyage or a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, shall be fitted with a set of signalling flags, as illustrated in the International Code of Signals published by the IMO, of a size suitable for signalling.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to a fishing vessel that was constructed before January 1, 1975 if it is fitted with signalling flags

    • (a) “N” and “C” to indicate it is in distress;

    • (b) “V” to indicate it requires assistance;

    • (c) “O” to indicate man overboard;

    • (d) “P” to indicate its nets have become fast on an obstruction;

    • (e) “T” to indicate pair-trawling, if the fishing vessel engages in pair-trawling; and

    • (f) “G” and “Z” to indicate, respectively, hauling its nets and shooting its nets, if the fishing vessel engages in those activities in close proximity to other fishing vessels and does not use the bridge-to-bridge radiotelephone to inform other vessels of its activities.

Hand Lead Lines

  •  (1) Every ship of 20 m or more in length that is engaged on a voyage other than a minor waters voyage shall be fitted with one hand lead line.

  • (2) Every ship of 20 m or more in length that is not fitted with echo-sounding equipment and is engaged on a foreign voyage, a home-trade voyage, Class I or II, or an inland voyage, Class I, shall be fitted with two hand lead lines.

  • (3) Each hand lead line shall be not less than 46 m in length and shall be clearly and accurately marked to indicate the depth of water.

  • (4) The lead of each hand lead line shall weigh at least 3.2 kg and be capable of being armed.

PART 5Other Requirements

Search and Rescue Services

  •  (1) Every ship to which Chapter I of the Safety Convention applies that is certified to carry more than 12 passengers shall have on board a plan for co-operation with the appropriate search and rescue services in the event of an emergency.

  • (2) The plan shall be developed co-operatively by the ship, the company and the search and rescue services taking into account IMO MSC/Circ.1079, Guidelines on Preparing Plans for Cooperation Between Search and Rescue Services and Passenger Ships. It shall include provisions for the periodic undertaking of exercises to test its effectiveness.

Danger Messages

  •  (1) For the purposes of this section, tropical storm means a hurricane, typhoon, cyclone or other storm of a similar nature, and the master of a ship is deemed to have encountered a tropical storm if the master has reason to believe there is such a storm in the vicinity.

  • (2) The master of every ship shall communicate the information required by subsection (4) by all means at the master’s disposal to ships in the vicinity and to the shore station for the area if the ship encounters

    • (a) dangerous ice, a dangerous derelict or any other direct danger to navigation;

    • (b) a tropical storm or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm;

    • (c) winds of force 10 or higher on the Beaufort Scale for which no storm warning has been received by the ship; or

    • (d) sub-freezing air temperatures associated with gale force winds, causing severe ice accretion on superstructures.

  • (3) All radio communications under subsection (2) shall be preceded by the safety signal, using the procedure prescribed by the International Radio Regulations.

  • (4) The following information is required in danger messages:

    • (a) if the ship encounters dangerous ice, a dangerous derelict or any other direct danger to navigation,

      • (i) the kind of the ice, derelict or other danger encountered,

      • (ii) the position of the ice, derelict or other danger when last observed, and

      • (iii) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), when the danger was last observed;

    • (b) if the ship encounters a tropical storm or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm,

      • (i) a statement that a tropical storm has been encountered or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm has been encountered, as the case may be,

      • (ii) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), and the position of the ship when the storm was last observed, and

      • (iii) if feasible,

        • (A) the barometric pressure, with the reading corrected if practicable, the unit of measure (such as millibars, millimetres or inches) and whether the reading is corrected or not,

        • (B) the barometric tendency that indicates the change in barometric pressure during the past three hours,

        • (C) the true wind direction,

        • (D) the wind force on the Beaufort Scale,

        • (E) the state of the sea, such as smooth, moderate, rough or high,

        • (F) the size of swell, such as slight, moderate or heavy, the true direction from which it comes and, if practicable, the period or length of swell, such as short, average or long, and

        • (G) the true course and speed of the ship;

    • (c) if the ship encounters winds of a force of 10 or more on the Beaufort Scale for which no storm warning has been received by the ship,

      • (i) a statement that winds of a force of 10 or more on the Beaufort Scale have been encountered, and

      • (ii) the information set out in subparagraph (b)(ii) and as much of the information set out in clauses (b)(iii)(A) to (D) and (G) as practicable; and

    • (d) if the ship encounters sub-freezing air temperatures associated with gale force winds, causing severe ice accretion on superstructures,

      • (i) the time and date, in coordinated universal time (UTC), and position of the ship when the observation was made,

      • (ii) the air temperature,

      • (iii) the sea temperature, if practicable, and

      • (iv) the wind force and direction.

  • (5) Examples of the information required to be communicated in danger messages are set out in Schedule 3.

Ships’ Personnel

  •  (1) On all ships, to ensure effective crew performance in navigational safety matters, a working language shall be established and recorded. On every ship to which Chapter I of the Safety Convention applies, the working language shall be recorded in the ship’s log book.

  • (2) The company or the master, as appropriate, shall determine the appropriate working language under subsection (1) and ensure that each crew member is able to understand and, if appropriate, give orders and instructions and to report back in that language.

  • (3) If the working language is not an official language of the state whose flag the ship is entitled to fly, all plans and lists required to be posted shall include a translation into the working language.

 On every ship to which Chapter I of the Safety Convention applies, English shall be used on the bridge as the working language for bridge-to-bridge and bridge-to-shore safety communications, as well as for communications on board between the pilot and bridge watchkeeping personnel, unless the individuals directly involved in the communication speak a common language other than English.

Records of Navigational Activities

  •  (1) A record of navigational activities and incidents that are of importance to the safety of navigation shall be kept on board every ship of 150 tons or more that is engaged on an international voyage.

  • (2) The record shall contain sufficient detail to establish a complete record of the voyage, taking into account the annex to IMO Resolution A.916(22), Guidelines for the Recording of Events Related to Navigation.

  • (3) The record shall be maintained by written, mechanical or electronic means, be preserved according to section 4 of the annex referred to in subsection (2) and be retained for a period of not less than five years.

Operational Limitations

  •  (1) This section applies to every passenger ship to which Chapter I of the Safety Convention applies that is certified to carry more than 12 passengers.

  • (2) A list of all limitations on the operation of a passenger ship, including exemptions from any provision of Chapter V of the Safety Convention, restrictions in operating areas, weather restrictions, sea state restrictions, restrictions in permissible loads, trim, speed and any other limitations, whether imposed by the government of the state whose flag the ship is entitled to fly or established during the design or building stage of the ship, shall be compiled before the ship enters into service.

  • (3) The list, together with any necessary explanations, shall be kept on board, be readily available to the master and be kept updated. The list shall be in the English or the French language.

Instructions and Diagrams

 A ship on which a remote steering gear control system or a steering gear power unit is fitted shall have permanently displayed, on its navigating bridge and in its steering gear compartment, if any, simple, brief operating instructions and a block diagram showing the changeover procedures for the system or unit.

Manoeuvring Information

  •  (1) Every ship, other than a Safety Convention ship, of 1600 tons or more that was constructed before March 1, 2001 shall comply with the annex to IMO Resolution A.209(VII), Recommendation on Information to Be Included in the Manoeuvring Booklets.

  • (2) A ship shall comply with the annex to IMO Resolution A.601(15), Provision and Display of Manoeuvring Information on Board Ships if

    • (a) it is of 1600 tons or more and was constructed on or after March 1, 2001;

    • (b) it is a Safety Convention ship; or

    • (c) it is a chemical carrier or gas carrier that was constructed on or after March 1, 2001.

  • (3) If it is not practicable to complete the manoeuvring information that is required to comply with the resolution referred to in subsection (2) before the ship enters into service, the information shall be

    • (a) completed in a preliminary form before the ship enters into service;

    • (b) completed in a final form as soon as practicable after the ship enters into service; and

    • (c) verified in its final form within 18 months after the ship enters into service.

Visibility from Navigating Bridge

  •  (1) In this section, length, in respect of a vessel, means 96 per cent of the total length on a waterline at 85 per cent of the least moulded depth measured from the top of the keel or the length from the fore side of the stem to the axis of the rudder stock on that waterline, whichever is greater. In vessels designed with a rake of keel, the waterline on which the length is measured shall be parallel to the designed load waterline.

  • (2) Every ship of 45 m or more in length that is a Safety Convention ship and is constructed on or after July 1, 1998 or that is not a Safety Convention ship and is constructed on or after July 1, 2002 shall comply with subsections (4) to (12).

  • (3) Every ship of 45 m or more in length that is a Safety Convention ship that was constructed before July 1, 1998 and every Canadian ship that was constructed before July 1, 2002 shall, insofar as practicable, comply with subsections (4) and (5). However, structural alterations or additional equipment need not be required.

  • (4) The view of the sea surface from the conning position shall not be obscured for more than two ship lengths or 500 m, whichever is lesser, forward of the bow to 10° on either side under all conditions of draught, trim and deck cargo.

  • (5) With respect to blind sectors caused by cargo, cargo gear or other obstructions outside the wheelhouse forward of the beam that obstruct the view of the sea surface as seen from the conning position,

    • (a) no blind sector shall exceed 10°;

    • (b) the total arc of blind sectors shall not exceed 20°;

    • (c) the clear sectors between blind sectors shall be at least 5°; and

    • (d) in the view described in subsection (4), each individual blind sector shall not exceed 5°.

  • (6) The horizontal field of vision from the conning position shall extend over an arc of not less than 225° that is from right ahead to not less than 22.5° abaft the beam on either side of the ship.

  • (7) From each bridge wing, the horizontal field of vision shall extend over an arc of at least 225° that is from at least 45° on the opposite side through right ahead and then from right ahead to right astern through 180° on the same side of the ship.

  • (8) From the main steering position, the horizontal field of vision shall extend over an arc from right ahead to at least 60° on each side of the ship.

  • (9) The ship’s side shall be visible from the bridge wing.

  • (10) The height of the lower edge of the navigation bridge front windows above the bridge deck shall be kept as low as possible. In no case shall the lower edge present an obstruction to the forward view as described in this section.

  • (11) The upper edge of the navigation bridge front windows shall allow a forward view of the horizon, for a person with a height of eye of 1800 mm above the bridge deck at the conning position, when the ship is pitching in heavy seas.

  • (12) With respect to windows,

    • (a) to help avoid reflections, the navigation bridge front windows shall be inclined from the vertical plane top out, at an angle of not less than 10° but not more than 25°;

    • (b) framing between navigation bridge windows shall be kept to a minimum and not be installed immediately forward of any workstation;

    • (c) polarized or tinted windows shall not be fitted; and

    • (d) a clear view through at least two of the navigation bridge front windows and, depending on the bridge configuration, through an additional number of clear-view windows shall be provided at all times, regardless of weather conditions.

Repeals

 [Repeal]

 [Repeal]

Coming into Force

 These Regulations come into force on the day on which they are registered.

SCHEDULE 1(Subsections 1(1) and 11(1) and (2) and section 14)

Standards for Equipment

Column 1Column 2Column 3
ItemEquipmentPerformance StandardsTesting Standards
1The equipment referred to in sections 19 to 73 of these RegulationsIMO Resolution A.694(17), Annex, Recommendation on General Requirements for Shipborne Radio Equipment Forming Part of the Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) and for Electronic Navigational AidsIEC 60945: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — General requirements — Methods of testing and required test results
2Magnetic compasses and compass bearing devicesIMO Resolution A.382(X), Annex II, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Magnetic Compasses

ISO 449: Ships and marine technology — Magnetic compasses, binnacles and azimuth reading devices — Class A

ISO 2269: Shipbuilding — Class A magnetic compasses, azimuth reading devices and binnacles — Tests and certification

3Gyro-compasses and gyro-compass repeatersIMO Resolution A.424(XI), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Gyro-compassesISO 8728: Ships and marine technology — Marine gyro-compasses
4Transmitting heading devicesIMO Resolution MSC.116(73), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Marine Transmitting Heading Devices (THDs)

ISO 22090-1: Ships and marine technology — Transmitting heading devices (THDs) — Part 1: Gyro-compasses

ISO 11606: Ships and marine technology — Marine electromagnetic compasses

5Heading control systemsIMO Resolution MSC.64(67), Annex 3, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Heading Control SystemsISO 11674: Ships and marine technology — Heading control systems
6Track control systemsIMO Resolution MSC.74(69), Annex 2, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Track Control SystemsIEC 62065: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Track control systems — Operational and performance requirements — methods of testing and required test results
7Radars, electronic plotting aids and automatic tracking aidsIMO Resolution A.477(XII), Annex 4, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Radar Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.64(67), Annex 4

IEC 60936-1: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Radar — Part 1: Shipborne radar — Performance requirements — Methods of testing and required test results

IEC 60872-2: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Radar plotting aids — Part 2: Automatic tracking aids (ATA) — Methods of testing and required test results

IEC 60872-3: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Radar plotting aids — Part 3: Electronic plotting aids (EPA) — Performance requirements — Methods of testing and required test results

8Automatic radar plotting aids (ARPAs)IMO Resolution A.823(19), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPAs)IEC 60872-1: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Radar plotting aids — Part 1: Automatic radar plotting aids (ARPA) — Methods of testing and required test results
9Receivers for global navigation satellite systems and terrestrial radionavigation systems
  • (a) Loran-C and Chayka Receivers:

    IMO Resolution A.818(19), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne Loran-C and Chayka Receivers

  • (a) Loran-C and Chayka Receivers:

    IEC 61075: Loran-C receivers for ships — Minimum performance standards — Methods of testing and required test results

  • (b) Shipborne Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver Equipment:

    IMO Resolution A.819(19), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.112(73)

  • (b) Shipborne Global Positioning System (GPS) Receiver Equipment:

    IEC 61108-1: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) — Part 1: Global positioning system (GPS) — Receiver equipment — Performance standards, methods of testing and required test results

  • (c) Shipborne GLONASS Receiver Equipment:

    IMO Resolution MSC.53(66), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne GLONASS Receiver Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.113(73)

  • (c) Shipborne GLONASS Receiver Equipment:

    IEC 61108-2: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) — Part 2: Global navigation satellite system (GLONASS) — Receiver equipment — Performance standards, methods of testing and required test results

  • (d) Shipborne DGPS and DGLONASS Maritime Radio Beacon Receiver Equipment:

    IMO Resolution MSC.64(67), Annex 2, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne DGPS and DGLONASS Maritime Radio Beacon Receiver Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.114(73)

  • (e) Shipborne Combined GPS/GLONASS Receiver Equipment:

    IMO Resolution MSC.74(69), Annex 1, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Shipborne Combined GPS/GLONASS Receiver Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.115(73)

10Echo-sounding equipmentIMO Resolution A.224(VII), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Echo-Sounding Equipment, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.74(69), Annex 4ISO 9875: Ships and marine technology — Marine echo-sounding equipment
11Speed-and-distance measuring devicesIMO Resolution A.824(19), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Devices to Indicate Speed and Distance, as amended by IMO Resolution MSC.96(72), AnnexIEC 61023: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Marine speed and distance measuring equipment (SDME) — Performance requirements — Methods of testing and required test results
12Rate-of-turn indicatorsIMO Resolution A.526(13), Annex, Performance Standards for Rate-of-turn Indicators
13Signalling lampsIMO Resolution MSC.95(72), Annex, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Daylight Signalling Lamps
14Sound-reception systemsIMO Resolution MSC.86(70), Annex 1, Recommendation on Performance Standards for Sound Reception Systems
15Automatic identification systems (AISs) Class AImo Resolution MSC.74(69), Annex 3, Recommendation on Performance Standards for a Universal Shipborne Automatic Identification System (AIS)IEC 61993-2: Maritime navigation and radiocommunication equipment and systems — Automatic identification systems (AIS) — Part 2: Class A shipborne equipment of the universal automatic identification system (AIS) — Operational and performance requirements, methods of test and required test results
16[Repealed, SOR/2011-203, s. 14]
  • SOR/2011-203, s. 14
  • SOR/2019-100, s. 2

SCHEDULE 2(Paragraph 17(a))Certificate of Adjustment

This is to certify that the magnetic compass(es) of the SS/MS blank line O.N blank line, has (have) been adjusted to compensate for the ship’s magnetic condition. Tables showing residual deviations have this day been placed on board. These deviations have been ascertained on the various courses with the electric current both “on” and “off” in all circuits in the vicinity of the compass(es).

The deviations so found are practically identical under both conditions and are in accordance with the tables furnished this day to the ship.

Certified this blank line day of blank line, 20blank line at blank line.

blank line
(Signature)

SCHEDULE 3(Subsection 82(5))

Danger Messages

Column 1Column 2
ItemDangerExamples of Danger Messages
1Dangerous iceTTT ICE. LARGE BERG SIGHTED IN 4506N, 4410W, AT 0800 UTC. MAY 15.
2Dangerous derelictsTTT DERELICT. OBSERVED DERELICT ALMOST SUBMERGED IN 4006N, 1243W, AT 1630 UTC. APRIL 21.
3Other direct dangers to navigationTTT NAVIGATION. ALPHA LIGHTSHIP NOT ON STATION. 1800 UTC. JANUARY 3.
4A tropical storm or a storm that the master has reasonable grounds to believe might develop into a tropical storm

TTT STORM. 0030 UTC. AUGUST 18. 2004N, 11354E. BAROMETER CORRECTED 994 MILLIBARS, TENDENCY DOWN 6 MILLIBARS. WIND NW, FORCE 9, HEAVY SQUALLS. HEAVY EASTERLY SWELL. COURSE 067, 5 KNOTS.

TTT STORM. APPEARANCES INDICATE APPROACH OF HURRICANE. 1300 UTC. SEPTEMBER 14. 2200N , 7236W. BAROMETER CORRECTED 29.64 INCHES, TENDENCY DOWN

.015 INCHES. WIND NE, FORCE 8, FREQUENT RAIN SQUALLS. COURSE 035, 9 KNOTS.

TTT STORM. CONDITIONS INDICATE INTENSE CYCLONE HAS FORMED. 0200 UTC. MAY 4. 1620N, 9203E. BAROMETER UNCORRECTED 753 MILLIMETRES, TENDENCY DOWN 5 MILLIMETRES. WIND S BY W, FORCE 5. COURSE 300, 8 KNOTS.

TTT STORM. TYPHOON TO SOUTHEAST. 0300 UTC. JUNE 12. 1812N, 12605E. BAROMETER FALLING RAPIDLY. WIND INCREASING FROM N.

5Winds of force 10 or higher on the Beaufort Scale for which no storm warning has been received by the shipTTT STORM. WIND FORCE 11, NO STORM WARNING RECEIVED. 0300 UTC. MAY 4. 4830N, 30W. BAROMETER CORRECTED 983 MILLIBARS, TENDENCY DOWN 4 MILLIBARS. WIND SW, FORCE 11 VEERING. COURSE 260, 6 KNOTS.
6Sub-freezing air temperatures associated with gale force winds, causing severe ice accretion on superstructuresTTT EXPERIENCING SEVERE ICING. 1400 UTC. MARCH 2. 69N, 10W. AIR TEMPERATURE 18°F (-7.8°C). SEA TEMPERATURE 29°F (‑1.7°C). WIND NE, FORCE 8.
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