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Canada – Nova Scotia Offshore Marine Installations and Structures Transitional Regulations (SOR/2015-3)

Regulations are current to 2019-11-19 and last amended on 2017-08-23. Previous Versions

Canada – Nova Scotia Offshore Marine Installations and Structures Transitional Regulations

SOR/2015-3

CANADA-NOVA SCOTIA OFFSHORE PETROLEUM RESOURCES ACCORD IMPLEMENTATION ACT

OFFSHORE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT

Registration 2015-01-05

Canada – Nova Scotia Offshore Marine Installations and Structures Transitional Regulations

Definition

 In these Regulations, hazardous area means an area classified as hazardous in accordance with American Petroleum Institute RP 500, Recommended Practice for Classification of Locations for Electrical Installations at Petroleum Facilities. (zone dangereuse)

Reference

 In these Regulations, any reference to a standard is to be read as a reference to the most recent version of that standard.

  • SOR/2017-117, s. 1

Equipment

Immersion Suits

  •  (1) The operator must provide immersion suits that conform to the Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16, Immersion Suit Systems as follows:

    • (a) in the case of a workplace that is a manned installation, a number of immersion suits equal to twice the total number of persons on board at any one time, stowed such that they are readily available adjacent to each bed, with the remaining suits equally distributed among evacuation stations; and

    • (b) in the case of a workplace that is an unmanned installation, a number of immersion suits equal to the total number of persons on board at any one time, equally distributed among evacuation stations.

  • (2) However, if the workplace is a ship used for construction or for geotechnical or seismic work, the immersion suits that must be provided in the workplace under subsection (1) may conform to either the Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16, Immersion Suit Systems or the standards set out in

    • (a) the International Maritime Organization’s International Life-Saving Appliance (LSA) Code and Resolution MSC.81(70), Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances; and

    • (b) Part I, Chapter I, Section 1.2.1 and Part II, Section 15 of the Canadian Life Saving Appliance Standard - TP 14475, published by Transport Canada.

  • SOR/2017-117, s. 2

Firefighting Equipment

  •  (1) The operator must ensure that the workplace that is a manned installation be provided with at least 10 sets of firefighter equipment and must ensure that the workplace that is an unmanned installation be provided with at least two sets of firefighter equipment, each of which must consist of

    • (a) protective clothing, including boots and gloves, that

      • (i) meets the requirements of National Fire Protection Association 1971, Standard on Protective Clothing for Structural Fire Fighting,

      • (ii) protects the skin from being burned by heat radiating from a fire and by steam,

      • (iii) has a water-resistant outer surface,

      • (iv) in the case of boots, is made of rubber or other electrically non-conducting material, and

      • (v) in the case of gloves, meets the requirements of National Fire Protection Association 1973, Standard on Gloves for Structural Fire Fighting; and

    • (b) a firefighter’s helmet with visor that meets the requirements of the National Fire Protection Association Standard NFPA 1971, Standard on Protective Ensembles for Structural Fire Fighting and Proximity Fire Fighting.

  • (2) In addition to any firefighting equipment required by the Nova Scotia Offshore Marine Installations and Structures Occupational Health and Safety Transitional Regulations, the workplace that is a manned installation must be provided with at least four sets, and the workplace at which employees workplace that is an unmanned installation must be provided with at least two sets, of the following equipment:

    • (a) a self-contained breathing apparatus that

      • (i) is capable of functioning for at least 30 minutes,

      • (ii) meets the requirements of Canadian Standards Association (CSA) CAN/CSA standards Z94.4, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators, and Z180.1, Compressed Breathing Air and Systems, and

      • (iii) is equipped with two spare bottles;

    • (b) a portable electric safety lamp that

      • (i) will operate in the conditions anticipated for a Class I, Division 1, hazardous area,

      • (ii) is operated from a rechargeable battery capable of operating for at least three hours, and

      • (iii) can be easily attached to the clothing of a firefighter, at or above the waist level;

    • (c) an axe with an insulated handle and a carrying belt; and

    • (d) a fire-resistant life and signalling line and a safety belt and harness that meet the requirements of National Fire Protection Association 1983, Standard on Fire Service Life Safety Rope, Harness and Hardware.

  • (3) However, if the workplace is a ship used for construction or for geotechnical or seismic work, at least four sets of the required firefighting equipment must be provided and this equipment must conform to the standards set out in

    • (a) regulation 10, Fire fighting, of Chapter II-2 of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974;

    • (b) the International Maritime Organization’s International Code for Fire Safety Systems; and

    • (c) the Council of the European Union’s Directive 96/98/EC – Marine equipment, as adopted by domestic law of member states.

  • (4) The equipment referred to in subsections (1) to (3) must be kept ready for use and stored in a place that is easily accessible; and at least one set of that equipment must be easily accessible from the helicopter deck.

  • SOR/2017-117, s. 3
 
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