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Tax Court of Canada Rules (General Procedure) (SOR/90-688a)

Regulations are current to 2020-05-04 and last amended on 2014-02-07. Previous Versions

Examination for Discovery (continued)

Effect of Refusal

  •  (1) Where a party, or a person examined for discovery on behalf or in place of a party, has refused to answer a proper question or to answer a question on the ground of privilege, and has failed to furnish the information in writing not later than ten days after the proceeding is set down for hearing, the party may not introduce at the hearing the information refused on discovery, except with leave of the judge.

  • (2) The sanction provided by subsection (1) is in addition to the sanctions provided by section 110.

Effect of Counsel Answering

 Questions on an oral examination for discovery shall be answered by the person being examined but, where there is no objection, the question may be answered by counsel and the answer shall be deemed to be the answer of the person being examined unless, before the conclusion of the examination, the person repudiates, contradicts or qualifies the answer.

Information Subsequently Obtained

  •  (1) Where a party has been examined for discovery or a person has been examined for discovery on behalf or in place of, or in addition to the party, and the party subsequently discovers that the answer to a question on the examination,

    • (a) was incorrect or incomplete when made, or

    • (b) is no longer correct and complete,

    the party shall forthwith provide the information in writing to every other party.

  • (2) Where a party provides information in writing under subsection (1),

    • (a) the adverse party may require that the information be verified by affidavit of the party or be the subject of further examination for discovery, and

    • (b) the writing may be treated at a hearing as if it formed part of the original examination of the person examined.

  • (3) Where a party has failed to comply with subsection (1) or a requirement under paragraph (2)(a), and the information subsequently discovered is,

    • (a) favourable to that party’s case, the party may not introduce the information at the hearing, except with leave of the judge, or

    • (b) not favourable to that party’s case, the Court may give such direction as is just.

Discovery of Non-Parties with Leave

  •  (1) The Court may grant leave, on such terms respecting costs and other matters as are just, to examine for discovery any person who there is reason to believe has information relevant to a material issue in the appeal, other than an expert engaged by or on behalf of a party in preparation for contemplated or pending litigation.

  • (2) Leave under subsection (1) shall not be granted unless the Court is satisfied that,

    • (a) the moving party has been unable to obtain the information from other persons whom the moving party is entitled to examine for discovery, or from the person sought to be examined,

    • (b) it would be unfair to require the moving party to proceed to hearing without having the opportunity of examining the person, and

    • (c) the examination will not,

      • (i) unduly delay the commencement of the hearing of the proceeding,

      • (ii) entail unreasonable expense for other parties, or

      • (iii) result in unfairness to the person the moving party seeks to examine.

  • (3) A party who examines a person orally under this section shall, if requested, serve any party who attended or was represented on the examination with the transcript free of charge, unless the Court directs otherwise.

  • (4) The examining party is not entitled to recover the costs of the examination from another party unless the Court expressly directs otherwise.

  • (5) The evidence of a person examined under this section may not be read into evidence at the hearing under subsection 100(1).

Use of Examination for Discovery at Hearing

  •  (1) At the hearing, a party may read into evidence as part of that party’s own case, after that party has adduced all of that party’s other evidence in chief, any part of the evidence given on the examination for discovery of

    • (a) the adverse party, or

    • (b) a person examined for discovery on behalf of or in place of, or in addition to the adverse party, unless the judge directs otherwise,

    if the evidence is otherwise admissible, whether the party or person has already given evidence or not.

  • (1.1) The judge may, on request, allow the part of evidence referred to in subsection (1) to be read into evidence at a time other than that specified in that subsection.

  • (2) Subject to the provisions of the Canada Evidence Act, the evidence given on an examination for discovery may be used for the purpose of impeaching the testimony of the deponent as a witness in the same manner as any previous inconsistent statement by that witness.

  • (3) Where only part of the evidence given on an examination for discovery is read into or used in evidence, at the request of an adverse party the judge may direct the introduction of any other part of the evidence that qualifies or explains the part first introduced.

  • (3.1) A party who seeks to read into evidence under subsection (1) or who requests the judge to direct the introduction of evidence under subsection (3) may, with leave of the judge, instead of reading into evidence, file with the Court a photocopy or other copy of the relevant extracts from the transcripts of the examination for discovery, and when the copy is filed such extracts shall form part of the record.

  • (4) A party who reads into evidence as part of that party’s own case evidence given on an examination for discovery of an adverse party, or a person examined for discovery on behalf of or in place of or in addition to an adverse party, may rebut that evidence by introducing any other admissible evidence.

  • (5) The evidence given on the examination for discovery of a party under legal disability may be read into or used in evidence at the hearing only with leave of the judge.

  • (6) Where a person examined for discovery,

    • (a) has died,

    • (b) is unable to testify because of infirmity or illness,

    • (c) for any other sufficient reason cannot be compelled to attend at the hearing, or

    • (d) refuses to take an oath or make an affirmation or to answer any proper question,

    any party may, with leave of the judge, read into evidence all or part of the evidence given on the examination for discovery as the evidence of the person examined, to the extent that it would be admissible if the person were testifying in Court.

  • (7) In deciding whether to grant leave under subsection (6), the judge shall consider,

    • (a) the extent to which the person was cross-examined on the examination for discovery,

    • (b) the importance of the evidence in the proceeding,

    • (c) the general principle that evidence should be presented orally in Court, and

    • (d) any other relevant factor.

  • (8) Where an appeal has been discontinued or dismissed and another appeal involving the same subject matter is subsequently brought between the same parties or their representatives or successors in interest, the evidence given on an examination for discovery taken in the former appeal may be read into or used in evidence at the hearing of the subsequent appeal as if it had been taken in the subsequent appeal.

  • SOR/96-503, s. 2
  • SOR/2008-303, s. 15

Examinations Out of Court

Application of Sections 102 to 112

 Sections 102 to 112 apply to all oral examinations for which provision is made in these rules including,

  • (a) an oral examination for discovery,

  • (b) the taking of evidence before hearing,

  • (c) the cross-examination on an affidavit, and

  • (d) the examination out of Court of a witness before hearing of a pending motion.

Mode of Examination

  •  (1) An oral examination shall be held before a person agreed upon by the parties, who may be the verbatim reporter, or some other person if directed by the Court.

  • (2) Unless otherwise directed by the Court or the parties otherwise agree, an examination that takes place in Canada shall be under oath or upon affirmation as provided in the Canada Evidence Act.

  • (3) Unless otherwise directed by the Court, or the parties otherwise agree, an examination shall be recorded by a verbatim reporter and arrangements for the attendance of a reporter shall be made by the party conducting the examination, who shall pay the reporter’s fees.

  • (4) If the person being examined understands neither English nor French, or is deaf or mute, the examining party shall provide and pay the fees and disbursements of a competent and independent interpreter who shall take an oath or make an affirmation to interpret accurately the administration of the oath or affirmation, the questions to be put to the person being examined and the person’s answers.

  • (5) Where the examination is to be conducted in one of the official languages and the person to be examined would prefer to be examined in the other official language, the examining party shall advise the Registrar, and the Registrar shall then appoint an interpreter, at no cost to the parties, who shall take an oath or make an affirmation to interpret accurately the administration of the oath or affirmation and the questions to be put to the person being examined and the person’s answers.

  • (6) The transcript of the examination shall be certified as correct by the person who recorded the examination, but need not be read to or signed by the person examined.

  • SOR/2004-100, s. 13(F)
  • SOR/2008-303, s. 16
 
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