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Life Saving Equipment Regulations (C.R.C., c. 1436)

Regulations are current to 2019-12-03 and last amended on 2019-06-17. Previous Versions

Life Saving Equipment Regulations

C.R.C., c. 1436

CANADA SHIPPING ACT, 2001

Regulations Respecting Life Saving Equipment

Short Title

 These Regulations may be cited as the Life Saving Equipment Regulations.

Interpretation

  •  (1) The definitions in this subsection apply in these Regulations.

    accredited service technician

    accredited service technician means a qualified person who is trained and accredited by the manufacturer of inflatable survival equipment to test, inspect, service and repair it. (technicien d’entretien agréé)

    Act

    Act means the Canada Shipping Act. (Loi)

    approved

    approved, in respect of survival craft or equipment, means that the prototype of the survival craft or equipment has been approved by the Board as having met the construction and performance standards set out or referred to in these Regulations. (homologué)

    approved boat

    approved boat means a boat that was recognized and approved as an approved boat under these Regulations as they read prior to April 28, 1996. (embarcation approuvée)

    certified

    certified means certified by the Board. (autorisé)

    Class II EPIRB

    Class II EPIRB means an emergency position indicating radiobeacon. (RLS de classe II)

    complement

    complement means

    • (a) in respect of a ship, the number of persons authorized to be carried under the inspection certificate issued for the ship; and

    • (b) in respect of a survival craft, the number of persons approved to be carried on the survival craft. (chargement en personnes)

    existing ship

    existing ship means a Canadian ship that is not a new ship. (navire existant)

    float-free device

    float-free device means a device that enables a survival craft to be released automatically from a sinking ship and to be ready for use. (dispositif à dégagement libre)

    free-fall launching

    free-fall launching means a method of launching a survival craft by which the craft, with its complement and equipment on board, is released and allowed to fall free into the water without any restraining equipment. (mise à l’eau en chute libre)

    Gulf of St. Lawrence

    Gulf of St. Lawrence means the area bounded on the east by the west coast of the Island of Newfoundland, on the north by a line joining Flowers Island and Point Amour, Newfoundland, and on the southeast by a line joining Port aux Basques, Newfoundland, and Sydney, Nova Scotia. (golfe du Saint-Laurent)

    inflatable survival equipment

    inflatable survival equipment means an inflatable life raft, an inflatable rescue platform or a marine evacuation system and includes

    • (a) a container for the inflatable life raft, the inflatable rescue platform or the marine evacuation system;

    • (b) a hydrostatic release unit; and

    • (c) a release hook for an inflatable davit-launched life raft. (équipement de sauvetage gonflable)

    inspector

    inspector means a steamship inspector appointed under section 301 of the Act. (inspecteur)

    launching device

    launching device means a device for launching a survival craft safely to the water from its stowed location. (dispositif de mise à l’eau)

    length

    length means

    • (a) in the case of a ship that is registered under the Act or is required by the Act to be registered, the length set out in the ship’s certificate of registry; or

    • (b) in the case of a ship that is not required by the Act to be registered, the horizontal distance between perpendiculars erected at the extreme ends of the outside of the hull. (longueur)

    major conversion

    major conversion, in respect of a ship, means a change that

    • (a) substantially alters the dimensions or carrying capacity of the ship; or

    • (b) alters the type of the ship. (transformation importante)

    marine evacuation system

    marine evacuation system means life saving equipment that consists of one or more inflatable life rafts, a slide or chute as a means of embarkation into the inflatable life rafts and, in the case of a system with more than one life raft, an inflatable rescue platform. (dispositif d’évacuation en mer)

    new ship

    new ship means a Canadian ship that is

    • (a) with respect to a Safety Convention ship,

      • (i) a ship the keel of which was laid on or after July 1, 1986,

      • (ii) a ship the keel of which was laid before July 1, 1986 and that underwent a major conversion on or after July 1, 1986, or

      • (iii) a ship that was registered in Canada on or after July 1, 1986; and

    • (b) with respect to a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship,

      • (i) a ship the keel of which was laid on or after April 28, 1996,

      • (ii) a ship that underwent a major conversion on or after April 28, 1996, or

      • (iii) a ship that was registered in Canada on or after April 28, 1996. (navire neuf)

    person

    person means a person who is one year of age or over. (personne)

    pyrotechnic distress signal

    pyrotechnic distress signal means a rocket parachute flare, a hand flare or a buoyant smoke signal. (signal de détresse pyrotechnique)

    recovery arrangements

    recovery arrangements, in respect of a ship, means equipment for

    • (a) hoisting a survival craft safely from the water; and

    • (b) where the survival craft serves the ship, returning the survival craft to its stowed location. (moyens de récupération)

    rescue boat

    rescue boat means a vessel designed to be used for rescuing persons in distress and marshalling survival craft. (canot de secours)

    rigid

    rigid, in respect of a life raft, an emergency boat or a rescue boat, means constructed of rigid materials or a combination of rigid materials and inflatable compartments and not relying wholly on inflatable compartments for buoyancy and form. (rigide)

    SART

    SART means a radar transponder designed for search and rescue purposes. (répondeur SAR)

    sea area A1

    sea area A1 has the meaning assigned in Chapter IV of the Safety Convention. (zone océanique A1)

    short international voyage

    short international voyage means an international voyage

    • (a) in the course of which a ship is not more than 200 nautical miles from a port or place in which the passengers and crew could be placed in safety; and

    • (b) that does not exceed 600 nautical miles in length between the last port of call in the country in which the voyage begins and the final port of destination. (voyage international court)

    survival craft

    survival craft means a lifeboat, a rescue boat, an emergency boat, a suitable boat, a buoyant apparatus, a life raft or an inflatable rescue platform. (bateau de sauvetage)

    tanker

    tanker means a cargo ship constructed or adapted for the carriage in bulk of liquid cargoes of a flammable, toxic or hazardous nature and includes a chemical tanker and a liquefied gas tanker. (navire-citerne)

    tow-boat

    tow-boat means a ship engaged in towing another ship or a floating object astern or alongside or in pushing another ship or a floating object ahead. (bâtiment remorqueur)

    VHF coverage area

    VHF coverage area means

    • (a) the Great Lakes;

    • (b) the Saguenay River downstream from Chicoutimi;

    • (c) the St. Lawrence River as far seaward as a straight line drawn

      • (i) from Cap-des-Rosiers to West Point, Anticosti Island, and

      • (ii) from Anticosti Island to the north shore of the St. Lawrence River along the meridian of longitude 63° west;

    • (d) Puget Sound, State of Washington, U.S.A.; or

    • (e) all waters that are within a coverage radius of a Canadian Coast Guard or U.S. Coast Guard radio station providing a continuous maritime mobile distress and safety service on frequency 156.8 MHz (channel 16). (zone VHF)

  • (2) In these Regulations, the classes of home-trade voyages, inland voyages and minor waters voyages have the meanings assigned in sections 4 to 6 of the Home-Trade, Inland and Minor Waters Voyages Regulations.

  • (3) A reference in these Regulations to an incorporated classification, standard, procedure or other specification shall be interpreted as excluding the following phrases that appear in that material:

    • (a) “acceptable to the Administration”;

    • (b) “to the satisfaction of the Administration”;

    • (c) “in the opinion of the Administration”;

    • (d) “acceptable to the approval authority”;

    • (e) “approved by the approval authority”; and

    • (f) “accepted by the commandant”.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 1
  • SOR/81-430, s. 1
  • SOR/83-500, s. 1
  • SOR/89-528, s. 1
  • SOR/96-218, s. 1
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 1
  • SOR/2001-173, s. 1
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 1, 76(F)
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 1

Application

Where Regulations Do Not Apply

 These Regulations do not apply in respect of

  • (a) fishing vessels;

  • (b) pleasure craft;

  • (c) ships that are five tons gross tonnage or under and are certified to carry 12 passengers or fewer;

  • (d) cargo ships that are 15 tons gross tonnage or under; or

  • (e) ships capable of engaging in the drilling for, or the production, conservation or processing of, oil or gas.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 2
  • SOR/96-218, s. 1
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 2

Where Regulations Apply

  •  (1) Parts I and III of these Regulations apply in respect of existing ships.

  • (2) Parts II and III of these Regulations apply in respect of new ships.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 1

General

Classes of Ships

 For the purposes of these Regulations, ships are divided into the following classes:

  • (a) Class I consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are

    • (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on long international voyages, or

    • (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I;

  • (b) Class II consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are

    • (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on short international voyages, or

    • (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class II;

  • (c) Class III consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class III, or inland voyages, Class I;

  • (d) Class IV consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on inland voyages, Class II, or minor waters voyages, Class I;

  • (e) Class V consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II;

  • (f) Class VI consists of ships that are not over five tons gross tonnage and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers;

  • (g) Class VII consists of ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are certified to carry passengers, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable;

  • (h) Class VIII [reserved];

  • (i) Class IX consists of ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage and are

    • (i) Safety Convention ships that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on international voyages, or

    • (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I;

  • (j) Class X consists of ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are not certified to carry passengers, or are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on home-trade voyages, Class II, home-trade voyages, Class III, home-trade voyages, Class IV, inland voyages, Class I, inland voyages, Class II, minor waters voyages, Class I, or minor waters voyages, Class II; and

  • (k) Class XI consists of ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not certified to carry passengers but carry a crew, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 3
  • SOR/96-218, s. 1

Additional Equipment

 A ship may carry life saving equipment that is in addition to that required by these Regulations, if the additional equipment

  • (a) does not present a safety hazard;

  • (b) is not detrimental to the seaworthiness of the ship; and

  • (c) meets the requirements of these Regulations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 1

Marine Evacuation Systems

 If a ship is required to carry life rafts under Part I or II, a marine evacuation system may be substituted for the life rafts and any associated launching devices if

  • (a) the accommodation capacity of the life rafts of the marine evacuation system is at least equal to the accommodation capacity of the life rafts for which the marine evacuation system is substituted; and

  • (b) the marine evacuation system meets the requirements of Regulation 6.2 of Chapter VI of the International Life-saving Appliance Code published by the International Maritime Organization, as amended from time to time, and is approved as having met those requirements.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 1
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 3

PART IEquipment to Be Carried by Existing Ships

Upgrading Provisions for Existing Ships

  •  (1) Notwithstanding any other provision in this Part, an existing ship may carry, instead of the equipment required to be carried under this Part, the equipment required to be carried by a new ship of its class under Part II, if that equipment meets the requirements set out or referred to in Part III for equipment carried by a new ship.

  • (2) Notwithstanding sections 7 to 31, where a survival craft that was carried on an existing ship on April 27, 1996, and is set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection is replaced, its replacement shall be the survival craft set out in column II of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn II
    ItemSurvival Craft on Existing ShipReplacement Survival Craft
    1Class 1 lifeboatlifeboat
    2Class 2 lifeboatlifeboat
    2.1approved boatemergency boat
    3suitable boatemergency boat
    4[Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 4]
  • SOR/96-218, s. 1
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 4

 [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 5]

Class I Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on long international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I)

[SOR/96-218, s. 2]

 Every Class I ship making long international voyages shall carry

  • (a) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement; or

  • (b) alternatively, in lieu of the requirements of paragraph (a),

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate at least 37 1/2 per cent of the complement,

    • (ii) life rafts capable of being launched by launching devices, of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the portion of the complement not accommodated under subparagraph (i), and

    • (iii) launching devices sufficient in number to launch all the life rafts required under subparagraph (ii), fully loaded, in 30 minutes in calm conditions;

  • (c) on each side of the ship, a davit-launched approved boat that is not over 8.5 m in length and may count towards the requirements of paragraph (a) or (b) if it is a Class 1 lifeboat;

  • (d) on each side, under davits, one Class 1 motor lifeboat at least 7.3 m in length, that may count towards the requirements of paragraph (a) or (b), but a ship whose complement is under 31 may carry a single motor lifeboat;

  • (e) enough life rafts capable of being launched by launching devices for 25 per cent of the complement;

  • (f) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 61.0 m8622
    261.0 m or over but under 121.9 m12622
    3121.9 m or over but under 182.9 m18922
    4182.9 m or over but under 243.8 m241222
    5243.8 m or over301522
  • (g) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

    • (i) one for each member of the complement,

    • (ii) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

  • (h) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use;

  • (i) for each life raft, a Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

  • (j) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (k) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (l) the following distress signals:

    • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

    • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

  • (m) two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first, if the ship is

    • (i) a Safety Convention ship, or

    • (ii) 20 m or over in length; and

  • (n) [Repealed, SOR/2000-261, s. 2]

  • (o) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (p) and (q) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 3]

  • SOR/78-216, s. 1
  • SOR/80-685, s. 4
  • SOR/96-218, s. 3
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 2
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 6
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 1

 Every Class I ship making foreign voyages and being other than a Safety Convention ship, shall comply with the requirements of section 7.

 Every Class I ship making home-trade I voyages and being other than a Safety Convention ship, shall comply with the requirements of section 7 except that,

  • (a) not more than one motor lifeboat need be carried;

  • (b) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 4]

  • (c) in lieu of the quantity requirements of paragraph 7(e) life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate 10 per cent of the complement shall be carried;

  • (d) in lieu of the requirements of subparagraphs 7(g)(ii) and (iii), additional lifejackets, equal in number to 50 per cent of the number of berthed passengers, each lifejacket fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, shall be carried conspicuously stowed on deck.

  • (e) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 4]

  • SOR/96-218, s. 4

 A Class I ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 5
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 2

Class II Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on short international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class II)

[SOR/96-218, s. 6]

 Every Class II ship making short international voyages more than 20 miles from land shall carry

  • (a) subject to subparagraphs (i) and (ii) and paragraph (g), Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, in number and capacity in accordance with columns I and III of the following table:

    TABLE

    Registered Length of Ship (metres)IIIIII
    Minimum Number of LifeboatsSmaller Number of Lifeboats Exceptionally AuthorizedMinimum Capacity of Lifeboats (m3)
    Under 30.5 blank lineas the Board shall prescribe
    30.5 and under 36.6 blank line2211.327
    30.5 and under 36.6 blank line2211.327
    36.6 and under 42.7 blank line2218.406
    42.7 and under 48.8 blank line2225.485
    48.8 and under 53.3 blank line3332.564
    53.3 and under 57.9 blank line3338.228
    57.9 and under 62.5 blank line4443.891
    62.5 and under 67.1 blank line4449.554
    67.1 and under 70.1 blank line5452.386
    70.1 and under 74.7 blank line5460.881
    74.7 and under 77.7 blank line6567.960
    77.7 and under 82.3 blank line6576.455
    82.3 and under 86.9 blank line7584.951
    86.9 and under 91.4 blank line7593.446
    91.4 and under 96.0 blank line86101.941
    96.0 and under 100.6 blank line86110.436
    100.6 and under 106.7 blank line97121.762
    106.7 and under 112.8 blank line97134.505
    112.8 and under 118.9 blank line107145.832
    118.9 and under 125.0 blank line107157.159
    125.0 and under 132.6 blank line129171.317
    132.6 and under 140.2 blank line129185.475
    140.2 and under 149.4 blank line1410202.465
    149.4 and under 158.5 blank line1410220.871
    158.5 and under 167.6 blank line1612237.862
    167.6 and over blank lineas the Board shall prescribe

    except that

    • (i) where the Board considers the requirements of Column I to be unreasonable or impracticable, compliance with the requirements of Column II may be permitted in lieu thereof, and

    • (ii) the capacity of the lifeboats need not be greater than is necessary to accommodate the complement;

  • (b) on each side of the ship, a davit-launched approved boat that is not over 8.5 m in length and may count towards the requirements of paragraph (a) or (g) if it is a Class 1 lifeboat;

  • (c) on each side, one Class 1 motor lifeboat at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, that may count towards the requirements of paragraph (a) or (g), except that a ship whose complement is under 31 may carry a single motor lifeboat;

  • (d) where the lifeboats referred to in paragraph (a) are insufficient to accommodate the complement, additional survival craft to make up the deficiency, consisting of one of the following or a combination of the two:

    • (i) Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length and under davits, or

    • (ii) where the special subdivision requirements of the Hull Construction Regulations are complied with, life rafts or, if the embarkation station is 4.57 m or more above the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, life rafts under launching devices that are capable of launching the life rafts within 30 minutes in calm conditions;

  • (e) life rafts of aggregate capacity equal to 10 per cent of the lifeboat capacity, capable of being launched by launching devices where such devices are fitted under paragraph (d);

  • (f) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 7]

  • (g) notwithstanding the quantity requirements of paragraph (a), where the stowage of life rafts in accordance with subparagraph (d)(ii) is impracticable because of insufficient deck space, fewer lifeboats, except that

    • (i) a ship 57.9 m in length or over shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 2 Class 1 lifeboats at least 7.3 m in length, and

    • (ii) a ship under 57.9 m in length shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 1 Class 1 lifeboat at least 7.3 m in length,

    and such lifeboats shall, together with additional equipment as described under paragraph (d), accommodate the complement;

  • (h) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 61.0 m8622
    261.0 m or over but under 121.9 m12622
    3121.9 m or over but under 182.9 m18922
    4182.9 m or over but under 243.8 m241222
    5243.8 m or over301522
  • (i) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) one for each member of the complement,

    • (ii) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

  • (j) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use;

  • (k) for each life raft,

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I, and

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a short international voyage that is not a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class B (SOLAS) emergency pack set out in section 2 of Schedule I;

  • (l) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (m) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (n) the following distress signals:

    • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

    • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

  • (o) two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first, if the ship is

    • (i) a Safety Convention ship, or

    • (ii) 20 m or over in length and engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or beyond sea area A1; and

  • (p) [Repealed, SOR/2000-261, s. 3]

  • (q) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/78-216, s. 2
  • SOR/80-685, s. 5
  • SOR/96-218, s. 7
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 3
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 7
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 3

 Every Class II ship making short international voyages not more than 20 miles from land, other than home-trade IV or minor waters II voyages, shall carry

  • (a) subject to subparagraphs (i) and (ii) and paragraph (f), Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, in number and capacity in accordance with columns I and III of the following table:

    TABLE

    Registered Length of Ship (metres)IIIIII
    Minimum Number of LifeboatsSmaller Number of Lifeboats Exceptionally AuthorizedMinimum Capacity of Lifeboats (m3)
    Under 30.5 blank lineas the Board shall prescribe
    30.5 and under 36.6 blank line2211.327
    36.6 and under 42.7 blank line2218.406
    42.7 and under 48.8 blank line2225.485
    48.8 and under 53.3 blank line3332.564
    53.3 and under 57.9 blank line3338.228
    57.9 and under 62.5 blank line4443.891
    62.5 and under 67.1 blank line4449.554
    67.1 and under 70.1 blank line5452.386
    70.1 and under 74.7 blank line5460.881
    74.7 and under 77.7 blank line6567.960
    77.7 and under 82.3 blank line6576.455
    82.3 and under 86.9 blank line7584.951
    86.9 and under 91.4 blank line7593.446
    91.4 and under 96.0 blank line86101.941
    96.0 and under 100.6 blank line86110.436
    100.6 and under 106.7 blank line97121.762
    106.7 and under 112.8 blank line97134.505
    112.8 and under 118.9 blank line107145.832
    118.9 and under 125.0 blank line107157.159
    125.0 and under 132.6 blank line129171.317
    132.6 and under 140.2 blank line129185.475
    140.2 and under 149.4 blank line1410202.465
    149.4 and under 158.5 blank line1410220.871
    158.5 and under 167.6 blank line1612237.862
    167.6 and over blank lineas the Board shall prescribe

    except that

    • (i) where the Board considers the requirements of Column I to be unreasonable or impracticable, compliance with the requirements of Column II may be permitted in lieu thereof, and

    • (ii) the necessity of the lifeboats need not be greater than is necessary to accommodate the complement;

  • (b) if the ship is 30.5 m or over in length, on each side of the ship, an approved boat that is not over 8.5 m in length and may count towards the requirements of paragraph (a) or (f) if it is a Class 1 lifeboat;

  • (c) where the lifeboats referred to in paragraph (a) are insufficient to accommodate the complement, additional survival craft to make up the deficiency, consisting of one of the following or a combination of the two:

    • (i) Class 1 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length and under davits, or

    • (ii) where the special subdivision requirements of the Hull Construction Regulations are complied with, life rafts or, if the embarkation station is 4.57 m or more above the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, life rafts under launching devices that are capable of launching the life rafts within 30 minutes in calm conditions;

  • (d) life rafts of aggregate capacity equal to 10 per cent of the lifeboat capacity, capable of being launched by launching devices where such devices are fitted under paragraph (c);

  • (e) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 8]

  • (f) notwithstanding the quantity requirements of paragraph (a), where the stowage of life rafts as set out in subparagraph (c)(ii) is impracticable because of insufficient deck space, fewer lifeboats, except that

    • (i) a ship 57.9 m in length or over shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 2 Class 1 lifeboats at least 7.3 m in length, and

    • (ii) a ship under 57.9 m in length shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 1 Class 1 lifeboat at least 7.3 m in length,

    and that such lifeboats shall, together with additional equipment as described under paragraph (c), accommodate the complement;

  • (g) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 61.0 m8622
    261.0 m or over but under 121.9 m12622
    3121.9 m or over but under 182.9 m18922
    4182.9 m or over but under 243.8 m241222
    5243.8 m or over301522
  • (h) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) one for each member of the complement,

    • (ii) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

  • (i) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use;

  • (j) for each life raft, the Class B (SOLAS) emergency pack set out in section 2 of Schedule I;

  • (k) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (l) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (m) the following distress signals:

    • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

    • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals or, in the case of a ship that is engaged on a minor waters voyage, Class I, six Type B distress signals, were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

  • (n) two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first; and

  • (o) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 6
  • SOR/96-218, s. 8
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 4
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 8
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 4

 Every Class II ship making short international voyages that are home-trade IV or minor waters II voyages, shall carry

  • (a) subject to subparagraphs (i) and (ii) and to paragraph (d), Class 1 or Class 2 lifeboats each at least 7.3 m in length, each under davits, in number and capacity in accordance with columns I and III of the following table:

    TABLE

    Registered Length of Ship (metres)IIIIII
    Minimum Number of LifeboatsSmaller Number of Lifeboats Exceptionally AuthorizedMinimum Capacity of Lifeboats (m3)
    Under 30.5 blank lineas the Board shall prescribe
    30.5 and under 36.6 blank line2211.327
    36.6 and under 42.7 blank line2218.406
    42.7 and under 48.8 blank line2225.485
    48.8 and under 53.3 blank line3332.564
    53.3 and under 57.9 blank line3338.228
    57.9 and under 62.5 blank line4443.891
    62.5 and under 67.1 blank line4449.554
    67.1 and under 70.1 blank line5452.386
    70.1 and under 74.7 blank line5460.881
    74.7 and under 77.7 blank line6567.960
    77.7 and under 82.3 blank line6576.455
    82.3 and under 86.9 blank line7584.951
    86.9 and under 91.4 blank line7593.446
    91.4 and under 96.0 blank line86101.941
    96.0 and under 100.6 blank line86110.436
    100.6 and under 106.7 blank line97121.762
    106.7 and under 112.8 blank line97134.505
    112.8 and under 118.9 blank line107145.832
    118.9 and under 125.0 blank line107157.159
    125.0 and under 132.6 blank line129171.317
    132.6 and under 140.2 blank line129185.475
    140.2 and under 149.4 blank line1410202.465
    149.4 and under 158.5 blank line1410220.871
    158.5 and under 167.6 blank line1612237.862
    167.6 and over blank lineas the Board shall prescribe

    except that

    • (i) where the Board considers the requirements of Column I to be unreasonable or impracticable, compliance with the requirements of Column II may be permitted in lieu thereof, and

    • (ii) the capacity of the lifeboats need not be greater than is necessary to accommodate the complement;

  • (b) where the lifeboats referred to in paragraph (a) are insufficient to accommodate the complement, additional survival craft to make up the deficiency, consisting of one of the following or a combination of the two:

    • (i) Class 1 or Class 2 lifeboats, each at least 7.3 m in length and under davits, or

    • (ii) where the special subdivision requirements of the Hull Construction Regulations are complied with, life rafts or, if the embarkation station is 4.57 m or more above the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, life rafts under launching devices that are capable of launching the life rafts within 30 minutes in calm conditions;

  • (c) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 9]

  • (d) notwithstanding the quantity requirements of paragraph (a), where the stowage of life rafts in accordance with subparagraph (b)(ii) is impracticable because of insufficient deck space, fewer lifeboats, except that

    • (i) a ship 57.9 m in length or over shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 2 Class 1 or Class 2 lifeboats at least 7.3 m in length, and

    • (ii) a ship under 57.9 m in length shall carry on each side, under davits, at least 1 Class 1 or Class 2 lifeboat at least 7.3 m in length,

    and such lifeboats shall, together with additional equipment as described under paragraph (b), accommodate the complement;

  • (e) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II and III of that item:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn III
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 61.0 m82
    261.0 m or over but under 121.9 m122
    3121.9 m or over but under 182.9 m182
    4182.9 m or over but under 243.8 m242
    5243.8 m or over302
  • (f) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) one for each member of the complement,

    • (ii) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

  • (g) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use;

  • (h) for each life raft, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I;

  • (i) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (j) means of embarkation into survival craft; and

  • (k) six red hand flares.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 7
  • SOR/96-218, s. 9
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 5
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 9
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 5

 Every Class II ship making home-trade Class II voyages other than a Safety Convention ship, shall comply with the requirements of section 10, except that

  • (a) where accommodation for less than 300 persons is provided in life rafts, only one motor lifeboat need be carried, but where accommodation for 300 persons or more is provided in life rafts, a second motor lifeboat or mechanically propelled lifeboat shall be carried; and

  • (b) if the ship is less than 20 m in length and engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, it is not required to carry the survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus referred to in paragraph 10(j).

  • (c) to (e) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 10]

  • SOR/96-218, s. 10
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 6

 A Class II ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 11
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 6

Class III Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class III, or inland voyages, Class I)

 A Class III ship shall carry

  • (a) where the ship is 18.3 m or under in length, the following survival craft:

    • (i) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 1.59 m3 capacity with a means of launching, and

    • (ii) one or more life rafts of an aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement;

  • (b) where the ship is over 18.3 m but under 22.9 m in length, one Class 1 lifeboat that is under davits and is of at least 2.12 m3 capacity;

  • (c) where the ship is 22.9 m or over in length, on each side of the ship, one Class 1 lifeboat that is under davits and has the appropriate capacity for the length of the ship, in accordance with the table to this paragraph, except that the lifeboats need not be of a greater aggregate capacity than is sufficient to accommodate the complement:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn II
    ItemLength of ShipMinimum Capacity of Each Lifeboat (m3)
    122.9 m or over but under 30.5 m3.540
    230.5 m or over but under 45.7 m4.248
    345.7 m or over but under 61.0 m7.079
    461.0 m or over but under 91.4 m8.495
    591.4 m or over (home-trade voyage, Class III)8.495
    691.4 m or over (inland voyage, Class I)14.158
  • (d) where the lifeboats referred to in paragraph (b) or (c) are insufficient to accommodate the complement, additional survival craft to make up the deficiency, consisting of one of the following or a combination of the two:

    • (i) equally distributed on both sides of the ship, Class 1 lifeboats, each under davits and of the appropriate capacity for the length of the ship, in accordance with the table to paragraph (c), or

    • (ii) life rafts or, if the embarkation station is 4.57 m or more above the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition and the life rafts that are embarked at that station accommodate in total more than 50 persons, life rafts under launching devices that are capable of launching the life rafts within 30 minutes in calm conditions;

  • (e) where life rafts are carried pursuant to subparagraph (d)(ii), additional life rafts that

    • (i) have an aggregate capacity equal to 10 per cent of the capacity of the lifeboats carried, and

    • (ii) where the life rafts that are carried pursuant to subparagraph (d)(ii) are under launching devices, are capable of being launched by the launching devices;

  • (f) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of a table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of

    • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, that item in Table I, and

    • (ii) where the ship is engaged on an inland voyage, Class I, that item in Table II:

      TABLE I

      Home-Trade Voyages, Class III

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
      ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
      118.3 m or under211
      2Over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m422
      330.5 m or over but under 61.0 m632
      461.0 m or over1052

      TABLE II

      Inland Voyages, Class I

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
      ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
      118.3 m or under422
      2Over 18.3 m but under 61.0 m632
      361.0 m or over1052
  • (g) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) one for each member of the complement,

    • (ii) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

  • (h) for each life raft, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (i) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (j) where the ship is over 45.7 m in length, a line-throwing appliance;

  • (k) the following distress signals:

    • (i) 12 pyrotechnic distress signals of which six are rocket parachute flares and six are rocket parachute flares or red hand flares, or

    • (ii) where the following distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry:

      • (A) 12 Type A distress signals,

      • (B) six Type A distress signals and 12 Type B distress signals, or

      • (C) in the case of a ship that is 18.3 m or under in length, half of the number of distress signals referred to in clause (A) or (B);

  • (l) means of embarkation into survival craft; and

  • (m) if the ship is 20 m or over in length and engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 8
  • SOR/96-218, s. 12
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 7
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 10
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 7

 A Class III ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 9
  • SOR/96-218, s. 12
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 8

Class IV Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on inland voyages, Class II or minor waters voyages, Class I)

  •  (1) A Class IV ship shall carry

    • (a) subject to paragraph (b), at least one Class 1 lifeboat under davits and of the appropriate capacity for the length of the ship in accordance with the table to this paragraph, except that the lifeboats need not be of a greater aggregate capacity than is sufficient to accommodate the complement:

      TABLE

      Column IColumn II
      ItemLength of ShipMinimum Capacity of Each Lifeboat (m3)
      122.9 m or over but under 30.5 m3.540
      230.5 m or over but under 45.7 m4.248
      345.7 m or over but under 61.0 m7.079
      461.0 m or over8.495
    • (b) if the carriage of a lifeboat referred to in paragraph (a) is impracticable, an approved boat;

    • (c) enough life rafts to accommodate that part of the complement not accommodated in the lifeboat or emergency boat;

    • (d) where the embarkation station for life rafts is 4.57 m or more above the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition and the life rafts that are embarked at that station accommodate in total more than 50 persons, launching devices that are capable of launching the life rafts within 30 minutes in calm conditions;

    • (e) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item:

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
      ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
      122.9 m or under211
      2Over 22.9 m but under 30.5 m422
      330.5 m or over but under 61.0 m632
      461.0 m or over842
    • (f) the following supply of lifejackets:

      • (i) one for each member of the complement, and

      • (ii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

    • (g) for each life raft, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

    • (h) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

    • (i) the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 pyrotechnic distress signals of which six are rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where the following distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry:

        • (A) six Type B distress signals, or

        • (B) in the case of a ship engaged on a voyage not more than five nautical miles from shore, 12 Type C distress signals; and

    • (j) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (2) A Class IV ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

    • (a) the location of

      • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

      • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

      • (ii) muster stations, and

      • (iii) embarkation stations; and

    • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 10
  • SOR/96-218, s. 12
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 11
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 9

Class V Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II)

[SOR/96-218, s. 13]
  •  (1) A Class V ship shall carry

    • (a) if such ship is 45.7 m or over in length, on each side thereof one or more Class 2 lifeboats, each at least 4.9 m in length and each under davits, except that where carriage of lifeboats on each side is unreasonable or impracticable, they may be carried on one side only;

    • (b) if such ship is 45.7 m but not more than 22.9 m in length, one or more Class 2 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity and each under davits;

    • (c) if the ship is 22.9 m or under in length, where practicable, a suitable boat; and

    • (d) where the capacity of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (a), (b) or (c) is insufficient to accommodate the complement, additional Class 2 lifeboats that have the appropriate capacities or life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms, to make up the deficiency.

    • (e) to (h) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 14]

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity of the life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms that is referred to in paragraph (1)(d) or (3)(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • (3) A Class V ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry,

    • (a) instead of the survival craft referred to in subsection (1), one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship navigates

      • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

      • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

    • (b) instead of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (1)(d), enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough Class 2 lifeboats, life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • (4) [Repealed, SOR/2006-256, s. 1]

  • (5) A Class V ship shall carry

    • (a) the following lifebuoys:

      • (i) where the ship is under 45.7 m in length, at least four lifebuoys, two of which each have a self-igniting light attached and another two of which each have a buoyant lifeline attached, and

      • (ii) where the ship is 45.7 m or over in length, at least six lifebuoys, two of which each have a self-igniting light attached and two others of which each have a buoyant lifeline attached;

    • (b) the following supply of lifejackets:

      • (i) one for each member of the complement, and

      • (ii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater;

    • (c) for each life raft, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I;

    • (d) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

    • (e) for each suitable boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II; and

    • (f) six pyrotechnic distress signals of which three are rocket parachute flares.

  • (6) A Class V ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

    • (a) the location of

      • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

      • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

      • (ii) muster stations, and

      • (iii) embarkation stations; and

    • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 11
  • SOR/85-859, s. 1
  • SOR/96-218, s. 14
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 12
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 10
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 1
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 1

Class VI Ships(Ships that are not over five tons gross tonnage and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers)

  •  (1) A Class VI ship shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity of the life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms that is referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or (3)(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • (3) A Class VI ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (1)(a),

    • (a) one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship navigates

      • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

      • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

    • (b) enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • (4) [Repealed, SOR/2006-256, s. 2]

  • (5) A Class VI ship shall carry the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (a) one for each member of the complement; and

    • (b) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • (6) A Class VI ship shall carry the following equipment:

    • (a) for each life raft or inflatable rescue platform, the following:

      • (i) where the ship is engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

      • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, and

      • (iii) if the ship is engaged on any other voyage, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

    • (b) except where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the following distress signals:

      • (i) six pyrotechnic distress signals of which three are rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where 12 Type C distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry; and

    • (c) two lifebuoys, one of which has a buoyant lifeline attached.

  • (7) A Class VI ship shall be provided with signs that indicate the location of life saving equipment that is not stowed in plain view.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 15
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 13
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 11
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 2
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 2

Class VII Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are certified to carry passengers, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable)

  •  (1) A Class VII ship shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity of the life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms that is referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or (3)(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • (3) A Class VII ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (1)(a),

    • (a) one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship navigates

      • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

      • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

    • (b) enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • (4) [Repealed, SOR/2006-256, s. 3]

  • (5) A Class VII ship shall carry a suitable boat that is carried on board or towed.

  • (6) A Class VII ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II and III of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn III
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 25 m22
    225 m or over but under 50 m42
    350 m or over62
  • (7) A Class VII ship shall carry the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (a) one for each member of the complement; and

    • (b) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • (8) A Class VII ship shall carry, for each life raft and each inflatable rescue platform, the following equipment:

    • (a) if the ship is engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

    • (b) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I; and

    • (c) if the ship is engaged on any other voyage, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I.

  • (9) A Class VII ship shall carry, for each suitable boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II.

  • (10) A Class VII ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

    • (a) the location of

      • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

      • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

      • (ii) muster stations, and

      • (iii) embarkation stations; and

    • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 15
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 14
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 12
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 3
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 3

Class VIII Ships [reserved]

[SOR/96-218, s. 15]

Class IX Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I)

Ships Other Than Tankers

[SOR/96-218, s. 16]
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), a Class IX ship that is not a tanker and is a Safety Convention ship or a ship engaged on a foreign voyage shall carry

    • (a) Class 1 lifeboats not less than 7.3 m in length, each under davits, in accordance with paragraph (b) or (c), but where a ship is making home-trade IV or minor waters II voyages, the lifeboats may be of Class 2;

    • (b) subject to paragraph (c),

      • (i) on each side of the ship, one or more lifeboats of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement of which one shall be a motor lifeboat if the ship is of 1,600 tons, gross tonnage, or over, but no motor lifeboat need be carried on a ship that does not go more than 20 miles from land,

      • (ii) in the case of a ship described in subsection (2) and a ship, other than a tug, that goes more than 20 miles from land, one or more life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement, and

      • (iii) in the case of a tug, one or more life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement;

    • (c) if such ship is a whale factory, or fish processing or canning factory ship,

      • (i) either

        • (A) lifeboats, including one motor lifeboat, of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement on each side of the ship, or

        • (B) lifeboats, including one motor lifeboat, of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate at least 37 1/2 per cent of the complement on each side of the ship and life rafts, capable of being launched by launching devices, of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the portion of the complement not accommodated in the lifeboats and launching devices sufficient to launch all the life rafts required under this clause, fully loaded, in 30 minutes in calm conditions,

      • (ii) life rafts, or additional life rafts, capable of being launched by launching devices if such devices are provided under subparagraph (i), of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement,

      • (iii) on each side of the ship, an approved boat that is not over 8.5 m in length and may count towards the requirements of subparagraph (i) if it is a Class 1 lifeboat, and

      • (iv) notwithstanding subsection 2(1) of Part I of Schedule IX, gravity-type davits for the launching of lifeboats and for the launching of emergency boats that, pursuant to subparagraph (iii), are counted towards the requirements of subparagraph (i);

    • (d) eight lifebuoys;

    • (e) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

      • (i) one for each member of the complement, and

      • (ii) where the ship is a tug, at least two stowed in the wheelhouse and two stowed in the engine room;

    • (f) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (g) the following survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

      • (i) two, if the ship is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage, and

      • (ii) three, if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over;

    • (h) for each life raft,

      • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, a Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I,

      • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a voyage not more than 20 nautical miles from shore, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I, and

      • (iii) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, a Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

    • (i) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

    • (j) a line-throwing appliance;

    • (k) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

    • (l) the following SARTs:

      • (i) if the ship is 20 m or over in length but under 500 tons gross tonnage, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

      • (ii) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first; and

    • (m) [Repealed, SOR/2000-261, s. 8]

    • (n) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (1.1) Despite subparagraph (1)(l)(i), a ship that is under 300 tons gross tonnage and that on March 31, 2001 was required by these Regulations to carry two Class II EPIRBs may continue to carry them instead of a SART until one of the batteries of the Class II EPIRBs needs to be replaced.

  • (2) Every Class IX ship that is a bulk carrier, other than a tanker, that is over 91.4 m in length and makes voyages in the St. Lawrence River east of the Montreal entrance to the St. Lawrence Seaway shall include in its life saving equipment inflatable life rafts of sufficient capacity to accommodate half of the complement.

  • (3) Where some of the persons carried on a ship described in subsection (2) are berthed in the forward part of the ship, inflatable life rafts of sufficient capacity to accommodate all of those persons shall be stowed forward and the remaining inflatable life rafts shall be stowed aft.

  • (4) A ship of 150 m in length or over having no amidships superstructure shall carry, in addition to the life rafts required by subsection (1), a life raft that is capable of accommodating at least six persons and that is stowed as far forward as is reasonable and practicable.

  • (5) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 17]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 12
  • SOR/83-500, s. 2
  • SOR/96-218, s. 17
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 8
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 15

 [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 18]

  •  (1) Subject to subsection 20(2), a Class IX ship that is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, other than a tanker or a Safety Convention ship, shall carry

    • (a) if 30.5 m in length or over, either

      • (i) on each side of such ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits and of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate double the complement, or

      • (iii) on one side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate double the complement, the life rafts alone being capable of accommodating the complement;

    • (b) if such ship is under 30.5 m in length, either

      • (i) on each side of such ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits and of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement, or

      • (iii) on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats not less than 4.9 m in length, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate 1.5 times the complement, the life rafts alone being capable of accommodating the complement;

    • (c) if the requirements of paragraph (a) or (b) are impracticable, an approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 3.54 m3 and carries two or more equal-sized life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 200 per cent of the complement;

    • (d) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 19]

    • (e) if such ship is a tug, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement, but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a), (b) or (c) may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph;

    • (f) if such ship is of 1,600 tons, gross tonnage, or over, a Class 1 motor lifeboat not less than 4.9 m in length, under davits, which may count towards the lifeboat requirements elsewhere in this section;

    • (g) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item:

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
      ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
      1Under 30.5 m422
      230.5 m or over632
    • (h) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

      • (i) one for each member of the complement, and

      • (ii) where the ship is a tug, at least two stowed in the wheelhouse and two stowed in the engine room;

    • (i) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (j) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

      • (i) two, if the ship is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage, and

      • (ii) three, if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over;

    • (k) for each life raft, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

    • (l) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

    • (m) where the ship is 150 tons gross tonnage or over, a line-throwing appliance;

    • (n) the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals or, in the case of a ship that is under 500 tons gross tonnage, six Type A distress signals, were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

    • [(n) means of embarkation, in accordance with Schedule VI,

      • (i) at each set of davits, and

      • (ii) at places of embarkation into life rafts.]

    • (o) the following SARTs:

      • (i) if the ship is 20 m or over in length but under 500 tons gross tonnage, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

      • (ii) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first; and

    • (p) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (2) Despite subparagraph (1)(o)(i), a ship that is under 300 tons gross tonnage and that on March 31, 2001 was required by these Regulations to carry two Class II EPIRBs may continue to carry them instead of a SART until one of the batteries of the Class II EPIRBs needs to be replaced.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 13
  • SOR/82-952, s. 1(F)
  • SOR/83-500, s. 3
  • SOR/96-218, s. 19
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 9
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 16

Tankers

  •  (1) A Class IX ship that is a tanker and is a Safety Convention ship or a ship engaged on a foreign voyage shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is under 1,600 tons gross tonnage, on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats that are under davits, are not under 7.3 m in length and have an aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement;

    • (b) where the ship is 1,600 tons or over but under 3,000 tons gross tonnage, on each side of the ship and under gravity-type davits, the following lifeboats:

      • (i) where the ship is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore, one motor lifeboat, and

      • (ii) one or more Class 1 lifeboats not under 7.3 m in length, the aggregate capacity of which is sufficient to accommodate that part of the complement not accommodated in the motor lifeboat;

    • (c) where the ship is 3,000 tons gross tonnage or over, four lifeboats that are under gravity-type davits and are distributed equally on both sides of the ship, two of which are carried aft and two amidships or, where the ship has no amidships superstructure, are carried aft;

    • (d) where the ship is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore, the following life rafts:

      • (i) one or more life rafts having an aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement, and

      • (ii) where the ship is 150 m or over in length and has no amidships superstructure, a life raft that is capable of accommodating at least six persons and is stowed as far forward as is practicable;

    • (e) eight lifebuoys;

    • (f) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (g) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (h) the following survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

      • (i) two, if the ship is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage, and

      • (ii) three, if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over;

    • (i) for each life raft, at least the following equipment:

      • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, a Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I,

      • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a voyage not more than 20 nautical miles from shore, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I, and

      • (iii) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, a Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

    • (j) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

    • (k) a line-throwing appliance;

    • (l) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

    • (m) the following SARTs:

      • (i) if the ship is 20 m or over in length but under 500 tons gross tonnage, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

      • (ii) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first; and

    • (n) [Repealed, SOR/2000-261, s. 10]

    • (o) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (1.1) Despite subparagraph (1)(m)(i), a ship that is under 300 tons gross tonnage and that on March 31, 2001 was required by these Regulations to carry two Class II EPIRBs may continue to carry them instead of a SART until one of the batteries of the Class II EPIRBs needs to be replaced.

  • (2) A Class IX ship that is not a Safety Convention ship and is a tanker engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is under 1,600 tons gross tonnage, on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats that are under davits, are 4.9 m or over in length and have an aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement;

    • (b) where the ship is 1,600 tons or over but under 3,000 tons gross tonnage, the following lifeboats, under gravity-type davits,

      • (i) one motor lifeboat, and

      • (ii) on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats that are 4.9 m or over in length, the aggregate capacity of which is sufficient to accommodate that part of the complement not accommodated in the motor lifeboat;

    • (c) where the ship is 3,000 tons gross tonnage or over, four lifeboats, under gravity-type davits,

      • (i) that are distributed equally on both sides of the ship, two of which are carried aft and two amidships or, where the ship has no amidships superstructure, are carried aft, and

      • (ii) one of which is a motor lifeboat or, where the ship is 5,000 tons gross tonnage or over, two of which are motor lifeboats and are carried one on each side of the ship;

    • (d) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item:

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
      ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
      1Under 30.5 m422
      230.5 m or over632
    • (e) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (f) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (g) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

      • (i) two, if the ship is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage, and

      • (ii) three, if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over;

    • (h) for each life raft, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

    • (i) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

    • (j) where the ship is 150 tons gross tonnage or over, a line-throwing appliance;

    • (k) the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

      • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals or, in the case of a ship that is engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, six Type A distress signals, were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

    • (l) the following SARTs:

      • (i) if the ship is 20 m or over in length but under 500 tons gross tonnage, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

      • (ii) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first; and

    • (m) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • (2.1) Despite subparagraph (2)(l)(i), a ship that is under 300 tons gross tonnage and that on March 31, 2001 was required by these Regulations to carry two Class II EPIRBs may continue to carry them instead of a SART until one of the batteries of the Class II EPIRBs needs to be replaced.

  • (3) Notwithstanding paragraphs (1)(c) and (2)(c), where it is not practicable to carry four lifeboats aft, a Class IX ship may carry two lifeboats, one on each side of the ship, if

    • (a) each lifeboat

      • (i) has the capacity sufficient to accommodate the complement and is not over

        • (A) 8.5 m in length, where the ship is engaged on an international voyage or a foreign voyage, or

        • (B) 7.9 m in length, where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, and

      • (ii) is stowed

        • (A) as near as is safe and practicable to the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition, and

        • (B) as far forward as is practicable and, in any case, at least 1.5 times its own length forward of the ship’s propeller; and

    • (b) life rafts having the capacity sufficient to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement are carried.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 20
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 10
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 17

Signs

 A Class IX ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 20

Class X Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are not certified to carry passengers, or are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on home-trade voyages, Class II, home-trade voyages, Class III, home-trade voyages, Class IV, inland voyages, Class I, inland voyages, Class II, minor waters voyages, Class I, or minor waters voyages, Class II)

Ships Other Than Tankers

[SOR/96-218, s. 21]

 Subject to section 27.1, a Class X ship that is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, other than a tanker, shall carry

  • (a) if the ship is 30.5 m or more in length,

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats each of not less than 3.54 m3 capacity, each under davits, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats each of not less than 3.54 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate double the complement,

    • (iii) on one side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats each of not less than 3.54 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate double the complement, the life rafts alone being capable of accommodating the complement, or

    • (iv) in addition to two or more equal-sized life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 3.54 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 200 per cent of the complement;

  • (b) if such ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length, either

    • (i) on each side one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement,

    • (iii) one Class 1 lifeboat of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iv) a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, in addition to two or more equal-sized life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement;

  • (c) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 22]

  • (d) if such ship is 18.3 m in length or under,

    • (i) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 1.61 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship, and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a Class 2 lifeboat or suitable boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) in the case of a ship other than a tug, two or more equal size life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate double the complement;

  • (e) if such ship is a tug, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a), (b) or (d) may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph; and

  • (f) a Class 1 motor lifeboat of at least 3.54 m3 capacity, under davits that may count towards the lifeboat requirements elsewhere in this section, but this paragraph does not apply to

    • (i) a ship of less than 3,000 tons, gross tonnage, or

    • (ii) a ship that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  • (g) to (n) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 22]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 14
  • SOR/83-500, s. 4
  • SOR/96-218, s. 22
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 18

 Subject to section 27.1, a Class X ship that is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, other than a tanker, shall carry

  • (a) if such ship is 30.5 m in length or over,

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement, or

    • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 2.12 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be a Class 2 lifeboat;

  • (b) if such ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length,

    • (i) on each side one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement,

    • (iii) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iv) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be Class 2;

  • (c) if such ship is 18.3 m in length or under,

    • (i) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 1.42 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a suitable boat and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) in the case of a ship other than a tug, two or more equal size life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate double the complement; and

  • (d) if such ship is a tug, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement, but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a), (b) or (c) may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph.

  • (e) to (k) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 24]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 15
  • SOR/83-500, s. 5
  • SOR/96-218, s. 24
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 19

 Subject to section 27.1, a Class X ship that is engaged on an inland voyage, Class I, other than a tanker, shall carry

  • (a) if the ship is 30.5 m in length or over, either

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 3.54 m3 capacity, each under davits and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 3.54 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate double the complement, or

    • (iii) in addition to two or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 3.54 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 200 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be a Class 2 lifeboat;

  • (b) where the distance from any accommodation to the nearest equipment required under paragraph (a) exceeds 91.4 m, one or more life rafts readily available to and sufficient to accommodate all persons housed in such accommodation, but this equipment need not be additional to life rafts already carried in accordance with paragraph (a);

  • (c) if such ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length,

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement,

    • (iii) one Class 1 lifeboat of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iv) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be Class 2;

  • (d) if such ship is 18.3 m in length or under,

    • (i) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 1.42 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a Class 2 lifeboat or suitable boat that has a capacity of not less than 1.42 m3 and a means of launching and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) in the case of a ship other than a tug, two or more equal size life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate double the complement; and

  • (e) if such ship is a tug, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement, but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a), (c) or (d), may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph.

  • (f) to (l) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 26]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 16
  • SOR/82-952, s. 2(F)
  • SOR/83-500, s. 6
  • SOR/96-218, s. 26
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 20

 Subject to section 27.1, a Class X ship that is engaged on an inland voyage, Class II, or a minor waters voyage, Class I, other than a tanker, shall carry

  • (a) if such ship is 30.5 m in length or over,

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, the aggregate capacity of the life rafts and lifeboats being sufficient to accommodate 1.5 times the complement, or

    • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 2.12 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate 150 per cent of the complement and that of the life rafts alone being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be Class 2;

  • (b) where the distance from any accommodation to the nearest equipment required under paragraph (a) exceeds 91.4 m, life rafts readily available to and sufficient to accommodate all persons housed in such accommodation, but this equipment need not be additional to life rafts already carried in accordance with paragraph (a);

  • (c) if such ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length,

    • (i) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) on each side thereof, one or more Class 1 lifeboats, each of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, each under davits, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats on either side have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (iii) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 2.12 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iv) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement,

    but where a non-passenger ship carries more than one lifeboat, one lifeboat may be Class 2;

  • (d) if such ship is 18.3 m in length or under, either

    • (i) one Class 1 lifeboat of at least 1.42 m3 capacity, capable of being launched on either side of the ship and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a suitable boat and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) in the case of a ship other than a tug, two or more equal size life rafts of aggregate capacity sufficient to accommodate double the complement; and

  • (e) if such ship is a tug, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement, but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a), (c) or (d) may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph.

  • (f) to (k) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 28]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 17
  • SOR/83-500, s. 7
  • SOR/96-218, s. 28
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 21

 Subject to section 27.1, a Class X ship that is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, other than a tanker, shall carry

  • (a) if such ship is 18.3 m in length or over,

    • (i) one or more Class 2 lifeboats, each of at least 1.42 m3 capacity, each with means of launching and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a Class 2 lifeboat that has a capacity of not less than 1.42 m3 and a means of launching, and one or more life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) one or more life rafts sufficient for the complement;

  • (b) if such ship is under 18.3 m in length,

    • (i) one or more Class 2 lifeboats, each of at least 1.42 m3 capacity, each with means of launching and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

    • (ii) a suitable boat and one or more life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement or, where the carriage of a suitable boat is impracticable, sufficient life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement, or

    • (iii) one or more life rafts sufficient for the complement; and

  • (c) if such ship is a tug with a complement of two or more, in addition to the other requirements of this section, one or more life rafts with sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement, but any life rafts provided to meet the requirements of paragraph (a) or (b) may be counted toward the requirement of this paragraph.

  • (d) to (g) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 30]

  • SOR/80-685, s. 18
  • SOR/96-218, s. 30
  •  (1) A Class X ship, other than a tanker, that is a bulk carrier, is over 91.4 m in length and is engaged on a voyage on the St. Lawrence River east of the Montreal entrance to the St. Lawrence Seaway shall include in its life saving equipment life rafts of sufficient capacity to accommodate 50 per cent of the complement.

  • (2) Where some of the persons carried on a ship referred to in subsection (1) are berthed in the forward part of the ship, life rafts of sufficient capacity to accommodate all of those persons shall be stowed forward and the remaining life rafts shall be stowed aft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 31
  •  (1) A Class X ship, other than a tanker or a tug, that is engaged on a voyage set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection and is within the length range set out in column II of that item shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns III to V of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
    ItemVoyageLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Any voyage other than home-trade voyage, Class IV, or minor waters voyage, Class IIUnder 30.5 m211
    2Home-trade voyage, Class IV, or minor waters voyage, Class IIUnder 30.5 m2n/a1
    3Any voyage other than home-trade voyage, Class IV, or minor waters voyage, Class II30.5 m or over but under 152.4 m422
    4Home-trade voyage, Class IV, or minor waters voyage, Class II30.5 m or over but under 152.4 m4n/a2
    5Any voyage152.4 m or over422
  • (2) A Class X ship that is a tug shall carry

    • (a) if the tug is 25 m in length or over,

      • (i) two lifebuoys fitted with self-igniting lights,

      • (ii) two lifebuoys fitted with buoyant lifelines, and

      • (iii) two additional lifebuoys; and

    • (b) if the tug is less than 25 m in length,

      • (i) two lifebuoys that are arranged so as to float free if the tug suddenly capsizes,

      • (ii) one lifebuoy fitted with a self-igniting light, and

      • (iii) one lifebuoy fitted with a buoyant lifeline.

  • (3) A Class X ship, other than a tanker, shall carry

    • (a) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

      • (i) one for each member of the complement, and

      • (ii) where the ship is a tug, at least two stowed in the wheelhouse and two stowed in the engine room;

    • (b) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

    • (c) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

      • (i) two, in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III, and

      • (ii) three, in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III; and

    • (d) for each life raft,

      • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

      • (ii) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, and

      • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

    • (e) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

    • (f) for each suitable boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

    • (g) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, a line-throwing appliance;

    • (h) the following distress signals:

      • (i) where the ship is under 85 m in length, 12 pyrotechnic distress signals of which six are rocket parachute flares,

      • (ii) where the ship is 85 m or over in length, 12 rocket parachute flares, or

      • (iii) where the following distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry:

        • (A) in the case of a ship engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, six Type A distress signals,

        • (B) in the case of a ship engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II or an inland voyage, Class I, 12 Type A distress signals,

        • (C) in the case of a ship engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, 12 Type B distress signals, and

        • (D) in the case of a ship engaged on an inland voyage, Class II, six Type B distress signals;

    • (i) means of embarkation into survival craft, except where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV or a minor waters voyage, Class II; and

    • (j) the following SARTs:

      • (i) in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

      • (ii) in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 31
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 11
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 22
  • SOR/2002-122, s. 1(F)

Tankers

 A Class X ship that is a tanker shall carry

  • (a) where the ship is under 1,600 tons gross tonnage, on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats under davits, each of which has a capacity of not less than 3.54 m3 and the aggregate capacity of which is sufficient to accommodate the complement;

  • (b) where the ship is 1,600 tons or over but under 3,000 tons gross tonnage, the following lifeboats, under gravity-type davits,

    • (i) one motor lifeboat, and

    • (ii) on each side of the ship, one or more Class 1 lifeboats that are 4.9 m in length or over, the aggregate capacity of which is sufficient to accommodate that part of the complement not accommodated in the motor lifeboat;

  • (c) where the ship is 3,000 tons gross tonnage or over, four lifeboats, under gravity-type davits,

    • (i) that are distributed equally on both sides of the ship, two of which are carried aft and two amidships or, where the ship has no amidships superstructure, are carried aft, and

    • (ii) one of which is a motor lifeboat or, where the ship is 5,000 tons gross tonnage or over, two of which are motor lifeboats and are carried one on each side of the ship;

  • (d) where the ship is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this paragraph, the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item:

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 30.5 m211
    230.5 m or over422
  • (e) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (f) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (g) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

    • (i) two, in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III, and

    • (ii) three, in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III;

  • (h) for each life raft,

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, and

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

  • (i) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (j) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, a line-throwing appliance;

  • (k) the following distress signals:

    • (i) 12 rocket parachute flares, or

    • (ii) where 12 Type A distress signals or, in the case of a ship engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, six Type A distress signals, were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry;

  • (l) means of embarkation into survival craft, except where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV or a minor waters voyage, Class II; and

  • (m) the following SARTs:

    • (i) in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

    • (ii) in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 31
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 12
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 23

Signs

 A Class X ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 31

Class XI Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not certified to carry passengers but carry a crew, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable)

[SOR/96-218, s. 32]
  •  (1) A Class XI ship that is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore shall carry

    • (a) if the ship is 30.5 m in length or over,

      • (i) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 3.54 m3 capacity, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 3.54 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 3.54 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement;

    • (b) if the ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length,

      • (i) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement; and

    • (c) if the ship is 18.3 m in length or under,

      • (i) a Class 1 lifeboat with means of launching, of not less than 1.61 m3 capacity, and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) a Class 1 lifeboat with means of launching, of not less than 1.61 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboat have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) a Class 2 lifeboat or suitable boat that has a means of launching, and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) Subject to subsection (3), a Class XI ship that is engaged on a voyage not more than 20 nautical miles from shore shall carry

    • (a) if the ship is 30.5 m in length or over,

      • (i) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a capacity of not less than 2.12 m3 and a means of launching, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement;

    • (b) if the ship is over 18.3 m but under 30.5 m in length,

      • (i) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) one or more Class 1 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 2.12 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboats have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) in addition to one or more life rafts, a Class 2 lifeboat or approved boat that has a means of launching and the capacity to accommodate no fewer than four persons, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement; and

    • (c) if the ship is 18.3 m in length or under,

      • (i) a Class 1 lifeboat with means of launching, of not less than 1.42 m3 capacity, and of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) a Class 1 lifeboat with means of launching, of not less than 1.42 m3 capacity, and one or more life rafts that together with the lifeboat have sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement, or

      • (iii) a Class 2 lifeboat or suitable boat that has a means of launching, and one or more life rafts, the aggregate capacity of those survival craft being sufficient to accommodate the complement.

  • (3) A Class XI ship that engages solely on home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II, shall carry

    • (a) one or more Class 2 lifeboats with means of launching, each of not less than 1.42 m3 capacity and of sufficient aggregate capacity to accommodate the complement; or

    • (b) a Class 2 lifeboat or suitable boat with a means of launching, and one or more life rafts of sufficient capacity to accommodate the complement.

  • (4) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsections (1) to (3), a Class XI ship that carries its survival craft more than 100 m from an area where persons are berthed shall carry, readily available to the persons berthed there, enough life rafts to accommodate them.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 19
  • SOR/83-500, s. 8
  • SOR/96-218, s. 33
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 24
  •  (1) A Class XI ship that is within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 30.5 m211
    230.5 m or over422
  • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), a Class XI ship need not carry more lifebuoys than there are members of the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class XI ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (b) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (c) where the ship is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore, a loud hailer or an equally efficient means of communication with the complement;

  • (d) for each life raft,

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, or a home-trade voyage, Class II, beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, and

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (e) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II and, for each approved boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (f) for each suitable boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (g) one line-throwing appliance, unless the ship

    • (i) is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, or

    • (ii) is making a voyage solely under tow and the tow boat is equipped with a line-throwing appliance; and

  • (h) the following distress signals:

    • (i) six rocket parachute flares, or

    • (ii) where the following distress signals were carried on April 27, 1996, those distress signals until their date of expiry:

      • (A) in the case of a ship engaged on a voyage two nautical miles or more but not more than 20 from shore, six Type B distress signals, and

      • (B) in the case of a ship engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore, six Type A distress signals.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 25

Signs

 A Class XI ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

PART IIEquipment to Be Carried by New Ships

Class I Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on long international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I)

  •  (1) Subject to section 33, a Class I ship shall carry, on each side of the ship,

    • (a) enough lifeboats under gravity-type davits to accommodate at least 50 per cent of the complement; or

    • (b) enough lifeboats under gravity-type davits to accommodate at least 37.5 per cent of the complement and enough life rafts under launching devices to accommodate at least 12.5 per cent of the complement.

  • (2) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1), a Class I ship shall carry enough life rafts under launching devices to accommodate at least 25 per cent of the complement.

  • (3) Lifeboats shall be partially enclosed or totally enclosed.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (3), a Class I ship that is under 500 tons gross tonnage with a complement of fewer than 200 persons may carry, on each side of the ship, instead of the survival craft referred to in section 32, enough life rafts to accommodate

    • (a) the complement, if the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level; or

    • (b) 150 per cent of the complement, if the life rafts are not stowed in accordance with paragraph (a).

  • (2) Where a rescue boat required under subsection 34(2) is certified as a lifeboat, its accommodation capacity may be included in the calculation under subsection (1) to reduce the number of life rafts required.

  • (3) The number of life rafts necessary to fulfil the requirements of subsection (1) shall be calculated in such a way that, taking into account the percentage of the complement that could be accommodated in each, should any one life raft be lost or rendered unserviceable, enough life rafts remain on each side of the ship to accommodate the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class I ship of 500 tons gross tonnage or over shall carry, on each side of the ship, at least one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • (2) A Class I ship of under 500 tons gross tonnage shall carry at least one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every life raft on a Class I ship shall be stowed

  • (a) with its painter permanently attached to the ship;

  • (b) fitted with a float-free device;

  • (c) so that it can be launched by one or two persons; and

  • (d) if it is inflatable, so that it inflates automatically if the ship sinks.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class I ship shall carry enough lifeboats and rescue boats to ensure that, in providing for abandonment by the complement, each lifeboat or rescue boat need not marshal more than six life rafts.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class I ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item.

TABLE

Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
1Under 60 m8622
260 m or over but under 120 m12622
3120 m or over but under 180 m18922
4180 m or over but under 240 m241222
5240 m or over301522
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class I ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

    • (i) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement,

    • (ii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater,

    • (iii) enough for persons on watch, and

    • (iv) enough at locations that are remote from muster and embarkation stations for all of the persons likely to be there.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 13

 A Class I ship shall carry

  • (a) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use;

  • (b) a marine anti-exposure work suit for each member of the rescue boat crew;

  • (c) for each life raft, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

  • (d) for each lifeboat and each rescue boat that is counted as a lifeboat for the purposes of subsection 33(1), the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (e) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (f) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (g) 12 rocket parachute flares;

  • (h) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used; and

  • (i) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 13
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 26, 76(F)

 A Class I ship that is a Safety Convention ship or is 20 m or over in length shall carry two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 14

 A Class I ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 14

Class II Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on short international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class II)

  •  (1) Subject to section 43, a Class II ship that is a Safety Convention ship shall carry

    • (a) on each side of the ship, enough lifeboats under gravity-type davits to accommodate at least 15 per cent of the complement; and

    • (b) equally distributed on each side of the ship, insofar as it is practicable, enough life rafts under launching devices to accommodate that part of the complement not accommodated in the lifeboats.

  • (2) Subject to section 43, every Class II ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall carry, equally distributed on each side of the ship, insofar as it is practicable, enough of the following to accommodate the complement:

    • (a) lifeboats under gravity-type davits; or

    • (b) a combination of life rafts and lifeboats all of which are under launching devices.

  • (3) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1) or (2), a Class II ship shall carry enough life rafts under launching devices to accommodate at least 25 per cent of the complement.

  • (4) Lifeboats shall be partially enclosed or totally enclosed.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (3), a Class II ship that is under 500 tons gross tonnage with a complement of fewer than 200 persons may carry on each side of the ship, instead of the survival craft referred to in section 42, enough life rafts to accommodate

    • (a) the complement, if the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level; or

    • (b) 150 per cent of the complement, if the life rafts are not stowed in accordance with paragraph (a).

  • (2) Where a rescue boat required under subsection 44(2) is certified as a lifeboat, its accommodation capacity may be included in the calculation under subsection (1) to reduce the number of life rafts required.

  • (3) The number of life rafts necessary to fulfil the requirements of subsection (1) shall be calculated in such a way that, taking into account the percentage of the complement that could be accommodated in each, should any one life raft be lost or rendered unserviceable, enough life rafts remain on each side of the ship to accommodate the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class II ship of 500 tons gross tonnage or over shall carry, on each side of the ship, at least one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • (2) A Class II ship that is under 500 tons gross tonnage shall carry at least one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every life raft on a Class II ship shall be stowed

  • (a) with its painter permanently attached to the ship;

  • (b) fitted with a float-free device;

  • (c) so that it can be launched by one or two persons; and

  • (d) if it is inflatable, so that it inflates automatically if the ship sinks.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class II ship shall carry enough lifeboats and rescue boats to ensure that, in providing for abandonment by the complement, each lifeboat or rescue boat need not marshal more than nine life rafts.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class II ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item.

TABLE

Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
1Under 60 m8622
260 m or over but under 120 m12622
3120 m or over but under 180 m18922
4180 m or over but under 240 m241222
5240 m or over301522
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class II ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement,

    • (ii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater,

    • (iii) enough for persons on watch, and

    • (iv) enough at locations that are remote from muster and embarkation stations for all of the persons likely to be there.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 15

 A Class II ship shall carry

  • (a) three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use, unless the ship is less than 20 m in length and engaged on a voyage that does not go beyond the Gulf of St. Lawrence;

  • (b) a marine anti-exposure work suit for each member of the rescue boat crew;

  • (c) for each life raft,

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I, and

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a short international voyage that is not a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class B (SOLAS) emergency pack set out in section 2 of Schedule I;

  • (d) for each lifeboat and each rescue boat that is counted as a lifeboat for the purposes of subsection 43(1), the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (e) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (f) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (g) 12 rocket parachute flares;

  • (h) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used; and

  • (i) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 15
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 27, 76(F)

 A Class II ship that is a Safety Convention ship or is 20 m or over in length and engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1 shall carry two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 16

 A Class II ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 16

Class III Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class III, or inland voyages, Class I)

 Subject to section 53, a Class III ship shall carry on each side of the ship

  • (a) enough life rafts to accommodate at least 60 per cent of the complement; and

  • (b) one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class III ship that is under 85 m in length may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in section 52,

  • (a) on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate at least 50 per cent of the complement; and

  • (b) at least one rescue boat under launching devices.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class III ship shall carry enough rescue boats to ensure that, in providing for abandonment by the complement, each rescue boat need not marshal more than nine life rafts.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 The requirements of paragraphs 52(a) and 53(a) may be met by the carriage of lifeboats, or a combination of lifeboats and life rafts, if the required survival craft accommodation capacity is maintained.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every life raft on a Class III ship shall be stowed

  • (a) with its painter permanently attached to the ship;

  • (b) fitted with a float-free device;

  • (c) so that it can be launched by one or two persons; and

  • (d) if it is inflatable, so that it inflates automatically if the ship sinks.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class III ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 25 m211
    225 m or over but under 50 m422
    350 m or over but under 85 m632
    485 m or over842
  • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), a Class III ship shall carry at least one lifebuoy on each side of each passenger deck.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class III ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) the following supply of lifejackets:

    • (i) enough conspicuously stowed on deck for 5 per cent of the complement,

    • (ii) enough that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater,

    • (iii) enough for persons on watch, and

    • (iv) enough at locations that are remote from muster and embarkation stations for all of the persons likely to be there.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 17

 A Class III ship shall carry

  • (a) a marine anti-exposure work suit for each member of the rescue boat crew;

  • (b) for each life raft, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (c) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (d) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (e) if the ship is 85 m or over in length, a line-throwing appliance;

  • (f) 12 pyrotechnic distress signals, of which six are rocket parachute flares and six are rocket parachute or hand flares;

  • (g) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used;

  • (h) means of embarkation into survival craft; and

  • (i) if the ship is 20 m or over in length and engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, three survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 17
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 28, 76(F)

 A Class III ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 18

Class IV Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on inland voyages, Class II, or minor waters voyages, Class I)

  •  (1) A Class IV ship shall carry

    • (a) enough life rafts to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) one emergency boat.

  • (2) The accommodation capacity of one emergency boat may be included in the calculation under paragraph (1)(a) to reduce the number of life rafts required.

  • (3) The requirements of subsection (1) may be met by the carriage of lifeboats, or a combination of lifeboats and life rafts, if the required survival craft accommodation capacity is maintained.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class IV ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 25 m211
    225 m or over but under 50 m422
    350 m or over but under 85 m632
    485 m or over842
  • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), a Class IV ship shall carry at least one lifebuoy on each side of each passenger deck.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IV ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) enough lifejackets that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 19

 A Class IV ship shall carry

  • (a) for each life raft, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (b) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (c) for each emergency boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (d) 12 pyrotechnic distress signals, of which six are rocket parachute flares;

  • (e) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used; and

  • (f) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 29, 76(F)

 A Class IV ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 20

Class V Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are certified to carry more than 12 passengers on home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II)

  •  (1) A Class V ship shall carry

    • (a) enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) unless the ship has a freeboard of less than 1.5 m or is fitted with a boarding platform, one emergency boat.

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity of the life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms that is referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or 67(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 4
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 4

 A Class V ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in subsection 66(1),

  • (a) one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship navigates

    • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

    • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

  • (b) enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 30
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 5
  •  (1) A Class V ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 50 m422
    250 m or over622
  • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), a Class V ship shall carry at least one lifebuoy on each side of each passenger deck.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class V ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) enough lifejackets that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 21

 A Class V ship that carries survival craft shall carry

  • (a) for each life raft and each inflatable rescue platform, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I;

  • (b) for each emergency boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (c) six pyrotechnic distress signals, of which three are rocket parachute flares;

  • (d) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used; and

  • (e) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 31, 76(F)

 A Class V ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 22

Class VI Ships(Ships that are not over five tons gross tonnage and that are certified to carry more than 12 passengers)

  •  (1) A Class VI ship shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity of the life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms that is referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or 3(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • (3) A Class VI ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (1)(a),

    • (a) one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship operates

      • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

      • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

    • (b) enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 6
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 5

 A Class VI ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) enough lifejackets that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 23

 A Class VI ship that carries survival craft shall carry

  • (a) for each life raft and each inflatable rescue platform,

    • (i) where the ship is engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, or

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (b) six pyrotechnic distress signals, of which three are rocket parachute flares; and

  • (c) at least one lifebuoy on each side of each passenger deck, of which one on each deck is fitted with a buoyant lifeline.

  • (d) and (e) [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 32]

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 32

 A Class VI ship shall be provided with signs that indicate the location of life saving equipment that is not stowed in plain view.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 33

Class VII Ships(Ships that are over five tons gross tonnage, are certified to carry passengers, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable)

  •  (1) A Class VII ship shall carry

    • (a) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV or a minor waters voyage, Class II, enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) where the ship is engaged on any other voyage, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) If a ship navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more, the requirement in respect of the accommodation capacity referred to in paragraph (1)(a) or (3)(b) may be met by counting not more than 33.33 per cent of the complement of the life raft or inflatable rescue platform as being in the water, holding on to the life raft or inflatable rescue platform.

  • (3) A Class VII ship that navigates in waters the temperature of which is 15°C or more may carry, instead of the survival craft referred to in paragraph (1)(a),

    • (a) one lifebuoy for every four members of the complement if the ship navigates

      • (i) within 150 m of shore, or

      • (ii) in a depth of water not exceeding 1.5 m; or

    • (b) enough buoyant apparatus to accommodate not more than 40 per cent of the complement of the ship and enough life rafts or inflatable rescue platforms to accommodate that portion of the complement not accommodated by the buoyant apparatus.

  • (4) A Class VII ship shall have an emergency boat that is carried on board or towed.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 34
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 7

 A Class VII ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II and III of that item.

TABLE

Column IColumn IIColumn III
ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysBuoyant Lifelines
1Under 25 m22
225 m or over but under 50 m42
350 m or over62
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class VII ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) enough lifejackets that are suitable for children for at least 10 per cent of the complement or one for each child on board, whichever is greater.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 24

 A Class VII ship shall carry

  • (a) for each life raft and each inflatable rescue platform,

    • (i) where the ship is engaged on a voyage beyond the limits of a home-trade voyage, Class III, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, or

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (b) for each emergency boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (c) six hand flares;

  • (d) one portable battery-powered loud hailer located at each muster station where

    • (i) more than 100 persons are to be mustered, or

    • (ii) a marine evacuation system is used; and

  • (e) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 35, 76(F)

 A Class VII ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices,

    • (i.1) lifejackets and lifejackets suitable for children,

    • (ii) muster stations, and

    • (iii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the muster and embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 25

Class VIII Ships [Reserved]

[SOR/96-218, s. 34]

Class IX Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage and are (i) Safety Convention ships that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on international voyages, or (ii) ships that are not Safety Convention ships and that are not certified to carry passengers, or that are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on foreign voyages or home-trade voyages, Class I)

  •  (1) Subject to sections 82, 83 and 85, a Class IX ship shall carry, on each side of the ship, enough totally enclosed lifeboats under gravity-type davits to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1), a Class IX ship shall carry on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate

    • (a) the complement, if the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level; or

    • (b) 150 per cent of the complement, if the life rafts are not stowed in accordance with paragraph (a).

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship that has free-fall launching devices may carry, instead of the lifeboats referred to in subsection 81(1), enough totally enclosed lifeboats capable of being free-fall launched over the stern of the ship to accommodate the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), a Class IX ship that is 85 m or under in length, other than a tanker, may carry on each side of the ship, instead of the survival craft referred to in section 81, enough life rafts to accommodate

    • (a) the complement, if the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level; or

    • (b) 150 per cent of the complement, if the life rafts are not stowed in accordance with paragraph (a).

  • (2) The number of life rafts necessary to fulfil the requirements of subsection (1) shall be calculated in such a way that, taking into account the percentage of the complement that could be accommodated in each, should any one life raft be lost or rendered unserviceable, enough life rafts remain on each side of the ship to accommodate the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Where the Class IX ship referred to in subsection 81(1) or section 82 is a tanker, the lifeboats shall be fire-protected and shall have a self-contained air support system.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship that is not a tanker and is a Safety Convention ship engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, may carry partially enclosed lifeboats instead of totally enclosed lifeboats.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Where the survival craft in a Class IX ship are stowed more than 100 m from the stem or stern, the ship shall carry an additional life raft stowed as far forward or as far aft as is practicable, as the case may be.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship shall carry at least one rescue boat under launching devices, unless one of the ship’s lifeboats meets the requirements for a rescue boat.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every life raft on a Class IX ship, other than a life raft referred to in section 86, shall be stowed

  • (a) with its painter permanently attached to the ship;

  • (b) fitted with a float-free device; and

  • (c) if it is inflatable, so that it inflates automatically if the ship sinks.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to V of that item.

TABLE

Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn V
ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsSelf-activating Smoke SignalsBuoyant Lifelines
1Under 100 m 8422
2100 m or over but under 150 m10522
3150 m or over but under 200 m12622
4200 m or over14722
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

    • (i) enough that are suitable for children, for all of the children on board,

    • (ii) enough for all of the persons on watch, of which at least two are stowed in the wheelhouse and two in the engine room, and

    • (iii) enough at locations that are remote from embarkation stations for all of the persons likely to be there.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class IX ship shall carry

  • (a) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

    • (i) two, if the ship is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage, and

    • (ii) three, if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over;

  • (b) for each life raft, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I;

  • (c) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (d) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (e) a line-throwing appliance;

  • (f) 12 rocket parachute flares;

  • (g) one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement; and

  • (h) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 18
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 36
  •  (1) A Class IX ship shall carry the following SARTs:

    • (a) if the ship is 20 m or over in length but under 500 tons gross tonnage, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first; and

    • (b) if the ship is 500 tons gross tonnage or over, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • (2) Despite subsection (1), a ship that is under 300 tons gross tonnage and that on March 31, 2001 was required by these Regulations to carry two Class II EPIRBs may continue to carry them instead of a SART until one of the batteries of the Class II EPIRBs needs to be replaced.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 19

 A Class IX ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Class X Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not Safety Convention ships and are not certified to carry passengers, or are certified to carry 12 or fewer passengers, on home-trade voyages, Class II, home-trade voyages, Class III, home-trade voyages, Class IV, inland voyages, Class I, inland voyages, Class II, minor waters voyages, Class I, or minor waters voyages, Class II)

 A Class X ship that is not a tanker shall carry, on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class X ship that is 85 m or under in length and is not a tanker shall carry

    • (a) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or an inland voyage, Class I, one rescue boat under a launching device; and

    • (b) in any other case, one emergency boat under a launching device.

  • (2) A Class X ship that is over 85 m in length and is not a tanker shall carry

    • (a) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, one rescue boat under a launching device on each side of the ship;

    • (b) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, one rescue boat under a launching device; and

    • (c) if the ship is engaged on any other voyage, one emergency boat under a launching device.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 8
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 6
  •  (1) Subject to section 97, a Class X ship that is a tanker shall carry, on each side of the ship, enough totally enclosed lifeboats under launching devices to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) The lifeboats referred to in subsection (1) shall be fire-protected and have a self-contained air support system, unless the ship is engaged

    • (a) on a home-trade voyage, Class IV;

    • (b) on a minor waters voyage, Class II; or

    • (c) solely in the carriage of bunker oils and marine diesel oils, the flashpoint of which exceeds 60°C, as determined in a closed-cup test.

  • (3) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1), a Class X ship that is a tanker shall carry, on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate

    • (a) the complement, if the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level; or

    • (b) 150 per cent of the complement, if the life rafts are not stowed in accordance with paragraph (a).

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class X ship that is a tanker and has free-fall launching devices may carry, instead of the lifeboats required by subsection 96(1), enough totally enclosed lifeboats, capable of being free-fall launched over the stern of the ship, to accommodate the complement.

  • (2) The lifeboats referred to in subsection (1) shall be fire-protected and shall have a self-contained air support system unless the ship is engaged

    • (a) on a home-trade voyage, Class IV;

    • (b) on a minor waters voyage, Class II; or

    • (c) solely in the carriage of bunker oils and maritime diesel oils the flashpoint of which exceeds 60°C as determined in a closed-cup test.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 2

 Lifeboats carried on a Class X ship that is not a tanker shall be

  • (a) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, totally enclosed;

  • (b) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, partially enclosed self-righting or totally enclosed; and

  • (c) where the ship is engaged on an inland voyage, Class II, or a minor waters voyage, Class I, partially or totally enclosed.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class X ship that is over 100 m in length and carries its survival craft aft shall carry enough life rafts stowed in the forward part of the ship to accommodate all of the persons who are berthed there.

  • (2) Where the survival craft in a Class X ship are stowed more than 100 m from the stem or stern, the ship shall carry a life raft stowed as far forward or as far aft as is practicable, as the case may be.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class X ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

TABLE

Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
1Under 50 m422
250 m or over633
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class X ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement; and

  • (b) the following supply of lifejackets, each fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light:

    • (i) at least two stowed in the wheelhouse,

    • (ii) at least two stowed in the engine room, and

    • (iii) enough that are suitable for children for all of the children on board.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class X ship shall carry

  • (a) the following number of survival craft VHF radiotelephone apparatus stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use:

    • (i) two, in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III, and

    • (ii) three, in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, or a home-trade voyage, Class III;

  • (b) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (c) for each life raft,

    • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class II, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, or

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (d) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (e) for each emergency boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (f) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (g) if the ship is 85 m in length or over and is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, a line-throwing appliance;

  • (h) the following pyrotechnic distress signals:

    • (i) where the ship is under 85 m in length, 12 pyrotechnic distress signals of which six are rocket parachute flares, and

    • (ii) where the ship is 85 m in length or over, 12 rocket parachute flares;

  • (i) means of embarkation into survival craft; and

  • (j) the following SARTs:

    • (i) in the case of a ship that is 300 tons or over but under 500 tons gross tonnage and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, one SART stowed so that it is readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in one of the survival craft that are launched first, and

    • (ii) in the case of a ship that is 500 tons gross tonnage or over and is engaged on a voyage beyond the VHF coverage area or sea area A1, two SARTs stowed so that they are readily accessible for immediate use and for placing in the two survival craft that are launched first.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 20
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 37

 A Class X ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Class XI Ships(Ships that are over 15 tons gross tonnage, are not certified to carry passengers but carry a crew, are not self-propelled and are towed or pushed by a ship or operated by a cable)

  •  (1) A Class XI ship that is 85 m in length or over and is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore shall carry

    • (a) the following lifeboats and life rafts:

      • (i) on each side of the ship, enough partially enclosed lifeboats under launching devices to accommodate the complement, and

      • (ii) enough life rafts, but no fewer than two, to accommodate the complement; or

    • (b) the following life rafts and rescue boats:

      • (i) on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement,

      • (ii) enough life rafts, but no fewer than two, to accommodate the complement, and

      • (iii) at least one rescue boat with a means of launching.

  • (2) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1), a Class XI ship that carries its survival craft more than 100 m from an area where persons are berthed shall carry, readily available to the persons berthed there, enough life rafts to accommodate them.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class XI ship that is under 85 m in length and is engaged on a voyage more than 20 nautical miles from shore shall carry

  • (a) on each side of the ship, enough life rafts to accommodate the complement; and

  • (b) one emergency boat with a means of launching.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class XI ship that is engaged on a voyage not more than 20 nautical miles from shore shall carry

    • (a) enough life rafts to accommodate the complement; and

    • (b) one emergency boat with a means of launching.

  • (2) In addition to meeting the requirements of subsection (1), a Class XI ship that carries its survival craft more than 100 m from an area where persons are berthed shall carry, readily available to the persons berthed there, enough life rafts to accommodate them.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) A Class XI ship within the length range set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall carry the supply of equipment set out in columns II to IV of that item.

  • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), a Class XI ship need not carry more lifebuoys than there are members of the complement.

    TABLE

    Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IV
    ItemLength of ShipLifebuoysSelf-igniting LightsBuoyant Lifelines
    1Under 85 m422
    285 m or over633
  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A Class XI ship shall carry

  • (a) one lifejacket, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (b) where the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, one immersion suit, fitted with a whistle and a personal locator light, for each member of the complement;

  • (c) for each life raft,

    • (i) where the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class I, or a home-trade voyage, Class II, the Class A emergency pack set out in section 1 of Schedule I,

    • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, the Class C emergency pack set out in section 3 of Schedule I, or

    • (iii) in any other case, the Class B (Canadian) emergency pack set out in section 2.1 of Schedule I;

  • (d) for each lifeboat, the equipment set out in section 1 of Schedule II;

  • (e) for each emergency boat, the equipment set out in section 5 of Schedule II;

  • (f) for each rescue boat, the equipment set out in section 2 of Schedule II;

  • (g) one line-throwing appliance, unless the ship

    • (i) is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, or

    • (ii) is making a voyage solely under tow and the tow boat is equipped with a line-throwing appliance;

  • (h) six rocket parachute flares; and

  • (i) means of embarkation into survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 38

 A Class XI ship shall be provided with signs that indicate

  • (a) the location of

    • (i) survival craft and their launching devices, and

    • (ii) embarkation stations; and

  • (b) directions to the embarkation stations.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

PART IIIOperational Requirements and Equipment Standards

Life Saving Equipment Plans

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (4), every ship shall have a life saving equipment plan that is approved by the Board as meeting the requirements of these Regulations, is drawn to scale and shows

    • (a) the location, type and accommodation capacity of the survival craft carried on the ship, and the type of launching devices;

    • (b) the location, type and quantity of emergency equipment;

    • (c) the location of muster stations, their dimensions in square metres and the approach routes to the areas; and

    • (d) the location of embarkation stations, their dimensions in square metres and the approach routes to the areas.

  • (2) A life saving equipment plan that is submitted to the Board shall be in quadruplicate.

  • (3) A life saving equipment plan for a passenger ship shall not be combined with any other plan required to be submitted under the Act.

  • (4) The life saving equipment plan of an existing ship need not meet the requirements of subsection (1) if it is the most recent life saving equipment plan for that ship and was approved by the Board before April 28, 1996.

  • (5) Every proposed change to any aspect of a life saving equipment plan that has been approved by the Board shall be shown on a revised plan and the revised plan shall be submitted to the Board.

  • (6) [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 39]

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 39
  •  (1) Every ship shall carry, prominently displayed, the most recent life saving equipment plan that the Board approved for the ship.

  • (2) Despite subsection (1), a passenger ship of 25 m in length or under is not required to display a life saving equipment plan if doing so is impracticable because of the size or design of the ship.

  • (3) Every passenger ship shall make an announcement for the information of passengers before the ship leaves any place where passengers embark.

  • (4) The announcement shall

    • (a) specify the location of lifejackets;

    • (b) in each area of the ship, inform the passengers in that area of the location of lifejackets that are closest to them;

    • (c) specify the location of survival craft and muster stations; and

    • (d) in each area of the ship, inform the passengers in that area of the location of survival craft that are closest to them.

  • (5) The announcement shall be

    • (a) in either official language or in both, according to the needs of the passengers; and

    • (b) in the most recent format approved by the Board as meeting the requirements of this section.

  • SOR/2001-179, s. 40
  • SOR/2002-122, s. 2

Evacuation Procedures

 Every passenger ship shall have an evacuation procedure for the safe evacuation of the complement from the ship within 30 minutes after the abandon-ship signal is given.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 9

Evacuation of New Ships, Class IX

 The survival craft required for a new ship that is a Class IX ship shall be capable of being launched with their full complement and equipment within 10 minutes after the abandon-ship signal is given.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Maintenance, Servicing and Training

 The following inspections and tests shall be carried out and recorded in the official log of a ship once every week on a Safety Convention ship and once every two weeks on any other ship:

  • (a) survival craft and launching devices shall be visually inspected to ensure that they are ready for use;

  • (b) the motor of lifeboats and rescue boats shall be run ahead and astern for a total period of not less than three minutes; and

  • (c) the general emergency alarm system shall be tested.

  • SOR/96-218, s.34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 41
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 26
  •  (1) Every ship shall carry maintenance manuals for life saving equipment that contain the following information from the equipment manufacturers:

    • (a) maintenance and repair instructions;

    • (b) schedules for periodic maintenance;

    • (c) diagrams of lubrication points with recommended lubricants;

    • (d) lists of replaceable parts;

    • (e) if available, up-to-date lists of suppliers of spare parts; and

    • (f) logs for the records of inspection and maintenance.

  • (2) The maintenance manuals shall be

    • (a) drafted in easily understood terms; and

    • (b) made available

      • (i) in English and French, and

      • (ii) in sufficient numbers to provide easy access to all crew members.

  • (3) Maintenance of life saving equipment shall be carried out in accordance with the instructions in the manuals referred to in subsection (1).

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 42

 Every ship shall carry spare parts and repair equipment for the life saving equipment and components that need regular replacement.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Where a ship carries survival craft that use falls as a means of launching, the falls shall be

  • (a) turned end for end at least every 30 months; and

  • (b) renewed at least once every five years or, where the falls show signs of deterioration, more often.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Every ship shall carry training manuals that explain how to use the ship’s life saving equipment.

  • (2) The training manuals shall be

    • (a) drafted in easily understood terms; and

    • (b) made available

      • (i) in English and French, and

      • (ii) in sufficient numbers to provide easy access to all crew members.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 The owner of a service station that services inflatable survival equipment shall ensure that the equipment is serviced

  • (a) in accordance with Schedule IV; and

  • (b) by an accredited service technician.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 43
  •  (1) The owner of a service station that services inflatable survival equipment shall ensure that the service station

    • (a) meets the requirements of section 1 of Schedule IV; and

    • (b) is accredited by each of the manufacturers whose equipment is serviced at the service station as providing the appropriate conditions for the servicing of the equipment, in accordance with

      • (i) the manufacturer’s recommendations, and

      • (ii) the requirements of section 1 of Schedule IV.

  • (2) Each time the servicing of any piece of inflatable survival equipment is about to begin, the owner of the service station shall notify the Board office closest to the service station.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 44
  •  (1) Every emergency boat or rescue boat shall

    • (a) be repaired and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions; and

    • (b) subject to subsection (2), be repaired at a service station accredited by the manufacturer.

  • (2) Emergency repairs to emergency boats and rescue boats may be carried out on board ship.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Equipment Requiring Board Approval

  •  (1) Life saving equipment that is carried on a ship and is set out in column I of an item of the table to this section shall

    • (a) meet the requirements set out in the Schedule to these Regulations or the Standard, as amended from time to time, set out in column II of that item; and

    • (b) be approved as having met the requirements referred to in paragraph (a).

      TABLE

      Column IColumn II
      ItemLife Saving EquipmentSchedule or Standard
      0.1Class 1 lifeboatsSchedule V
      0.2Class 2 lifeboatsSchedule V
      0.3Approved boatsSchedule XV
      0.4Suitable boatsSchedule XV
      1LifeboatsSchedule V.1
      2Emergency boatsSchedule VII
      3Rescue boatsSchedule VII
      4Life raftsSchedule VIII
      5Inflatable rescue platformsSchedule VIII
      6Marine evacuation systemsRegulation 6.2 of Chapter VI of the International Life-saving Appliance Code published by the International Maritime Organization
      7LifebuoysRegulation 1 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances
      8Self-igniting lightsRegulation 1.9 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances
      9Self-activating smoke signalsRegulation 10.2 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances
      10Type A, Type B and Type C distress signalsSchedule III
      11Pyrotechnic distress signalsRegulation 4 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances
      12Lifejackets (Safety Convention ships)Regulation 2 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, and Standards for SOLAS Lifejackets, TP 13571, published by Transport Canada in 2003
      13Lifejackets (ships that are not Safety Convention ships)Sections 3 to 7 of Canadian General Standards Board Standard 65-GP-14M, published in September 1978 and entitled Standard for: Life Jackets, Inherently Buoyant, Standard Type
      14[Repealed, SOR/2006-256, s. 10]
      15Personal locator lightsRegulations 10.3 and 10.4 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances
      16Line-throwing appliancesSchedule XII
      17Immersion suitsSections 3 to 9 of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16-M89, published in February 1989 and entitled Marine Abandonment Immersion Suit Systems
      18Thermal protective aidsSchedule XIII
      19Marine anti-exposure work suits
      • (1) Regulations 3.1 to 3.2.7 and regulations 3.2.13 and 3.2.14 of Part 1 of Annex 6 to International Marine Organization Resolution MSC.81(70), adopted on December 11, 1998 and entitled Revised Recommendation on Testing of Life-Saving Appliances

      • (2) Paragraphs 9.2 to 9.4 and 9.6 of the Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.21-95, published in November 1995 and entitled Marine Anti-exposure Work Suit Systems

  • (2) and (3) [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 45]

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 45
  • SOR/2002-122, ss. 3 to 6
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 27
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 3(F)
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 10

Buoyant Apparatus

  •  (1) Every buoyant apparatus carried on a ship shall bear a label of the United States Coast Guard indicating that the apparatus meets the requirements of subpart 160.010 of Title 46, Volume 6, of the Code of Federal Regulations of the United States.

  • (2) Every marking on a buoyant apparatus carried on a ship shall be in English and French. This requirement does not apply in respect of the label required by subsection (1).

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 46
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 11
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 7

Pyrotechnic Distress Signals

 Every pyrotechnic distress signal carried on a ship shall be withdrawn from service at the latest four years after its date of manufacture.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Survival Craft VHF Radiotelephone Apparatus

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 21

SARTs

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 21

Class II EPIRBs

  •  (1) A Class II EPIRB carried on a ship shall meet the requirements of sections 25 to 27 of the Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999.

  • (2) The radio operator of a ship that carries a Class II EPIRB shall comply with the requirements of subsection 49(1) of the Ship Station (Radio) Technical Regulations, 1999.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 21

Immersion Suits

 The marking of an immersion suit and its storage container referred to in section 9 of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16-M89, published in February 1989 and entitled Marine Abandonment Immersion Suit Systems, shall be in English and French.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Lifejackets

 Every lifejacket carried on a ship shall be readily accessible for immediate use and stowed in a location that is conspicuously marked.

  • SOR/2004-26, s. 28

Signs

  •  (1) Signs that indicate the location of survival craft, launching devices, emergency equipment, muster stations or embarkation stations and that provide directions to muster or embarkation stations shall

    • (a) be clearly visible under emergency lighting conditions; and

    • (b) use

      • (i) in the case of an existing ship, words in English and French or symbols; and

      • (ii) in the case of a new ship, symbols.

  • (2) Symbols shall be those set out in International Maritime Organization Resolution A.760(18), adopted on November 4, 1993 and entitled Symbols Related to Life-Saving Appliances and Arrangements, as amended from time to time.

  • (3) Where symbols referred to in subsection (2) require the use of words, the words shall be in English and French.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 29

Launching Devices

 Launching devices shall meet the requirements set out

  • (a) in the case of an existing ship, in Part I or II of Schedule IX; and

  • (b) in the case of a new ship, in Part II of Schedule IX.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Securing and Packing of Lifeboat, Rescue Boat and Emergency Boat Equipment

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), all equipment that is carried on a lifeboat, rescue boat or emergency boat shall be

    • (a) secured in the boat by lashings, stowed in lockers or compartments or secured to brackets or other similar mountings;

    • (b) secured so that it does not interfere with procedures for abandoning ship; and

    • (c) packed in as light and compact a form as is practicable.

  • (2) So that they are readily available for immediate use in fending off, boat-hooks shall not be secured.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Lifebuoys and Lifebuoy Equipment

  •  (1) Lifebuoys and lifebuoy equipment shall meet the requirements of Schedule XIV.

  • (2) Every lifebuoy carried on a ship shall be marked, in letters that are in a colour that contrasts with that of the lifebuoy and are not less than 100 mm in height, with the ship’s name and port of registry.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Means of Embarkation into Survival Craft

 Means of embarkation into survival craft shall meet the requirements set out in Schedule VI.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Muster Stations and Embarkation Stations

 Every new ship that is a passenger ship shall have muster stations that

  • (a) are in the vicinity of, and permit ready access by passengers to, the embarkation stations; and

  • (b) subject to section 135, provide a clear area of at least 1 m2 for every four passengers assigned to that station for marshalling and instruction.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every new ship that is a passenger ship shall have embarkation stations each of which provides

  • (a) where a marine evacuation system is used, a clear area with enough space to allow a continuous and unencumbered flow of passengers from the muster station to the head of the evacuation system; or

  • (b) in any other case and subject to section 135, a clear area of at least 1 m2 for every two persons to be embarked into survival craft from that station.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 76(F)

 Where a muster station and an embarkation station share a common area on a new ship that is a passenger ship, the common area shall provide at least 1 m2 for every four persons to be mustered there and embarked into survival craft from there, in addition to the space required to launch the survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every embarkation station on a new ship that is a cargo ship shall have an area of at least 1 m2 for every two persons to be embarked into survival craft from that station.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Muster and embarkation stations for davit-launched survival craft on new ships shall be arranged so as to enable persons on stretchers to be placed in survival craft.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 Every muster station and every embarkation station shall be

  • (a) readily accessible from accommodation and service areas; and

  • (b) adequately illuminated, with lighting capable of being supplied from the ship’s emergency electrical power source.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Every approach route to a muster station or an embarkation station, including alley-ways, stairways and exits, shall be adequately illuminated, with lighting capable of being supplied from the ship’s emergency electrical power source.

  • (2) Every ship shall be capable of supplying lighting to illuminate, during the preparation and launching of survival craft, the survival craft, their launching devices and the area of water into which they are to be launched.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Stowage and Handling of Survival Craft

General Requirements

 Where davits are required for lifeboats, rescue boats or emergency boats, a separate set of davits shall be provided for each boat.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

 A survival craft under launching devices shall be capable of being launched with its full complement and equipment, under 10° of trim and listing 20°.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Where a life raft or an inflatable rescue platform is carried in such a position that it may be lost or damaged by weather or another cause, it shall be secured with a lashing that incorporates a senhouse slip, hydrostatic release or other quick-release device.

  • (2) Every ship that is under 25 m in length shall carry its life rafts and inflatable rescue platforms

    • (a) placed in deep chocks, without lashings, so as to float free if the ship sinks; or

    • (b) secured by a lashing fitted with a hydrostatic release unit.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2002-122, s. 7
  •  (1) Survival craft that require launching devices shall be stowed as close to accommodation and service areas as possible.

  • (2) Launching stations shall be located so that survival craft may be launched

    • (a) safely, taking into account the clearance from the propeller and steeply overhanging portions of the hull; and

    • (b) insofar as it is possible, down the straight side of the ship, unless the survival craft are specially designed for free-fall launching.

  • (3) Where launching stations are positioned forward, they shall be located abaft the collision bulkhead in a sheltered position.

  • (4) The preparation and handling of survival craft at any one launching station shall not interfere with the prompt handling of any other survival craft at any other station.

  • (5) Every survival craft shall be stowed

    • (a) as near the waterline as is safe and practicable;

    • (b) so that, when in the embarkation position, it is not less than 2 m above the waterline when the ship is loaded with its full complement and equipment, under 10° of trim and listing by the lesser of 20° and the angle at which the ship’s weatherdeck edge becomes submerged;

    • (c) in a state of continuous readiness so that two crew members may carry out preparation for embarking and launching in less than five minutes; and

    • (d) in such a position as to prevent flooding by any discharge from the ship when the survival craft is being lowered to the water.

  • (6) Paragraph (5)(b) does not apply to an inflatable life raft that does not require launching devices.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 4(F)

Lifeboats

  •  (1) Lifeboats for lowering down the side of the ship shall be stowed

    • (a) on ships under 80 m in length, as far forward of the propeller as is practicable;

    • (b) on cargo ships 80 m or over but under 120 m in length, so that the after end of the lifeboat is not less than the length of the lifeboat forward of the propeller; and

    • (c) on passenger ships 80 m or over in length and cargo ships 120 m or over in length, so that the after end of the lifeboat is not less than 1.5 times the length of the lifeboat forward of the propeller.

  • (2) Lifeboats in their stowed location shall be protected from damage by heavy seas insofar as it is practicable.

  • (3) Lifeboats shall be stowed attached to their launching devices.

  • (4) Lifeboats shall be capable of being launched, where necessary utilizing painters, with the ship making headway at speeds of up to five knots in calm water.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Life Rafts

  •  (1) Life rafts shall be stowed so as to permit manual release from their securing arrangements.

  • (2) Life rafts that are designed to be davit-launched shall be

    • (a) stowed within reach of their lifting hooks; or

    • (b) provided with a means of transfer that is not rendered inoperable by

      • (i) the ship’s motion,

      • (ii) a power failure,

      • (iii) a list of 20° of the ship, or

      • (iv) a trim of 10° of the ship.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) On a passenger ship, every life raft that is boarded from a location on deck that is more than 4 m above the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition shall be davit-launched.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of an existing ship that is a Class II, Class III or Class IV ship referred to in

    • (a) subparagraph 10(d)(ii);

    • (b) subparagraph 11(c)(ii);

    • (c) subparagraph 12(b)(ii);

    • (d) subparagraph 14(d)(ii); or

    • (e) paragraph 16(1)(d).

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), if a life raft on a ship that is not a passenger ship is stowed more than 4 m above the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition, it shall be davit-launched unless it

    • (a) has a mass of not more than 185 kg; or

    • (b) is stowed for launching directly from the stowed position, from which it may be safely launched against a trim of 10° and a list of 20°.

  • (2) If the ship carries life rafts for more than 200 per cent of the complement, those life rafts in excess of 200 per cent need not be davit-launched.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 47

Rescue Boats and Emergency Boats

  •  (1) Rescue boats and emergency boats shall be stowed

    • (a) in a state of continuous readiness and capable of being launched in less than five minutes; and

    • (b) in a location suitable for launching and recovery.

  • (2) A rescue boat that is also a lifeboat shall meet the requirements of section 144.

  • (3) Every rescue boat, when loaded with its full complement and equipment, shall be capable of being hoisted at a rate of not less than 0.3 m/s.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

Stabilizers

  •  (1) Where the survival craft of a ship are stowed in such a location that they may be damaged by the ship’s stabilizer wings, the ship shall be equipped with a means of bringing the stabilizer wings inboard that may be operated

    • (a) from the navigating bridge; and

    • (b) by the ship’s emergency source of power.

  • (2) Indicators that are capable of being operated by the ship’s emergency source of power shall be provided on the navigating bridge to show the position of the stabilizer wings.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 34

SCHEDULE I(Paragraphs 7(i), 10(k), 11(j), 12(h), 14(h), 16(1)(g), 17(5)(c) and 18(6)(a), subsection 19(8) and paragraphs 20(1)(h), 22(k), 22.1(1)(i), 22.1(2)(h), 27.2(3)(d), 27.3(h), 30(d), 39(c), 49(c), 59(b), 64(a), 70(a), 74(a), 79(a), 91(b), 102(c) and 108(c))Equipment for Life Rafts and Inflatable Rescue Platforms

Class A Emergency Pack

  • 1 A Class A emergency pack for life rafts consists of

    • (a) one buoyant rescue quoit attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line;

    • (b) one non-folding safety knife with a buoyant handle and hand guard, attached and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy adjacent to the painter;

    • (c) for each life raft that has a complement of more than 12 persons, one safety knife, in addition to that required by paragraph (b), that is not required to be non-folding;

    • (d) two buoyant bailers for a life raft that has a complement of more than 12 persons, and one buoyant bailer in any other case;

    • (e) two sponges;

    • (f) two sea anchors

      • (i) one spare and the other permanently attached to the life raft in such a way that, when the life raft inflates and is waterborne, the sea anchor causes the life raft to lie oriented to the wind in a stable manner, and

      • (ii) each with a shock-resistant hawser and a tripping line, both the hawser and the line being strong enough for all sea conditions;

    • (g) two buoyant paddles;

    • (h) three safety can-openers suitable for opening water and ration supplies;

    • (i) one whistle or equivalent sound signalling device;

    • (j) the following distress signals:

      • (i) 12 pyrotechnic distress signals, of which four are rocket parachute flares, six are hand flares and two are buoyant smoke signals, or

      • (ii) until the first servicing of the life raft after April 27, 1996, two parachute distress signals and six red hand flares;

    • (k) one watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling and, in a watertight container, one spare set of batteries and one spare bulb for the flashlight;

    • (l) for each member of the complement, six doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one seasickness bag;

    • (m) one heliograph for signalling to ships and aircraft, with instructions for its use in English and French;

    • (n) one first aid kit that meets the requirements of section 4;

    • (o) a copy of life saving signals set out, in English and French, on a waterproof card or in a watertight container;

    • (p) for each member of the complement, a food ration totalling not less than 10 000 kJ, in airtight packaging and stowed in a watertight container showing an expiry date;

    • (q) one set of fishing tackle;

    • (r) the following water supplies:

      • (i) a rustproof, watertight container or individually sealed units containing 1.5 L of fresh water for each member of the complement, or

      • (ii) a rustproof, watertight container or individually sealed units containing 1 L of fresh water for each member of the complement and a desalting apparatus capable of producing 0.5 L of fresh water in two days for each member of the complement;

    • (s) one rustproof graduated drinking vessel, marked at the 30-mL, 45-mL and 60-mL levels;

    • (t) instructions, in English and French, on

      • (i) how to survive until rescued, and

      • (ii) the steps to be taken by the members of the complement immediately after boarding the life raft;

    • (u) thermal protective aids for 10 per cent of the complement of the life raft or two persons, whichever is greater;

    • (v) for each life raft with inflatable compartments, one repair outfit for repairing punctures and one topping-up bellows or pump; and

    • (w) one radar reflector.

Class B (SOLAS) Emergency Pack

  • 2 A Class B (SOLAS) emergency pack for life rafts consists of

    • (a) one buoyant rescue quoit attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line;

    • (b) one non-folding safety knife with a buoyant handle and hand guard, attached and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy adjacent to the painter;

    • (c) for each life raft that has a complement of more than 12 persons, one safety knife, in addition to that required by paragraph (b), that is not required to be non-folding;

    • (d) two buoyant bailers for a life raft that has a complement of more than 12 persons and one buoyant bailer in any other case;

    • (e) two sponges;

    • (f) two sea anchors,

      • (i) one spare and the other permanently attached to the life raft in such a way that, when the life raft inflates and is waterborne, the sea anchor causes the life raft to lie oriented to the wind in a stable manner, and

      • (ii) each with a shock-resistant hawser and a tripping line, both the hawser and the line being strong enough for all sea conditions;

    • (g) two buoyant paddles;

    • (h) one whistle or equivalent sound signalling device;

    • (i) the following distress signals:

      • (i) six pyrotechnic distress signals, of which two are rocket parachute flares, three are hand flares and one is a buoyant smoke signal, or

      • (ii) until the first servicing of the life raft after April 27, 1996, six red hand flares;

    • (j) one watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling and, in a watertight container, one spare set of batteries and one spare bulb for the flashlight;

    • (k) for each member of the complement, six doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one seasickness bag;

    • (l) one heliograph for signalling to ships and aircraft, with instructions for its use in English and French;

    • (m) one first aid kit that meets the requirements of section 4;

    • (n) a copy of life saving signals set out, in English and French, on a waterproof card or in a watertight container;

    • (o) instructions, in English and French, on

      • (i) how to survive until rescued, and

      • (ii) the steps to be taken by members of the complement immediately after boarding the life raft;

    • (p) thermal protective aids for two persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greater;

    • (q) for each life raft with inflatable compartments, one repair kit for repairing punctures and one topping-up bellows or pump; and

    • (r) one radar reflector.

Class B (Canadian) Emergency Pack

  • 2.1 A Class B (Canadian) emergency pack for life rafts consists of

    • (a) one buoyant rescue quoit attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line;

    • (b) one non-folding safety knife with a buoyant handle and hand guard, attached and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy adjacent to the painter;

    • (c) for each life raft that has a complement of more than 12 persons, one safety knife, in addition to that required by paragraph (b), that is not required to be non-folding;

    • (d) one buoyant bailer;

    • (e) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, one sea anchor that is

      • (i) permanently attached to the life raft in such a way that, when the life raft inflates and is waterborne, the sea anchor causes the life raft to lie oriented to the wind in a stable manner, and

      • (ii) fitted with a shock-resistant hawser and a tripping line, both the hawser and the line being strong enough for all sea conditions;

    • (f) two buoyant paddles;

    • (g) six red hand flares;

    • (h) one watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling and, in a watertight container, one spare set of batteries and one spare light bulb for the flashlight;

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, for each member of the complement, six doses of anti-seasickness medicine and one seasickness bag;

    • (j) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, one first aid kit that meets the requirements of section 4;

    • (k) a copy of life saving signals, in English and French, printed on a waterproof card or placed in a watertight container;

    • (l) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, thermal protective aids for two persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greater;

    • (m) for each life raft with inflatable compartments, one repair kit for repairing punctures and one topping-up bellows or pump; and

    • (n) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class III, or an inland voyage, Class I, one radar reflector.

Class C Emergency Pack

  • 3 A Class C emergency pack for life rafts and inflatable rescue platforms consists of

    • (a) one buoyant rescue quoit attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line;

    • (b) for each life raft,

      • (i) one non-folding safety knife with a buoyant handle and hand guard, attached and stowed in a pocket on the exterior of the canopy adjacent to the painter, and

      • (ii) where the life raft has a complement of more than 12 persons, one safety knife, in addition to that required by subparagraph (i), that is not required to be non-folding;

    • (c) for each inflatable rescue platform, two non-folding safety knives each with a buoyant handle and hand guard, one firmly secured to the top side of the platform adjacent to the painter and one to the underside;

    • (d) two buoyant bailers for a life raft or inflatable rescue platform that has a complement of more than 12 persons, and one buoyant bailer in any other case;

    • (e) two sponges;

    • (f) two buoyant paddles; and

    • (g) for each life raft with inflatable compartments and each inflatable rescue platform, one repair kit for repairing punctures and one topping-up bellows or pump.

First Aid Kit

    • 4 (1) A first aid kit referred to in paragraphs 1(n) and 2(m) consists of, at a minimum,

      • (a) 16 adhesive absorbent dressings, each 7.5 cm × 2.2 cm and individually wrapped;

      • (b) two bandage gauzes, each 5 cm × 4.6 m;

      • (c) four compress bandages, each 10 cm × 10 cm with 90-cm gauze tabs;

      • (d) two sterile abdominal pads, each 15.2 cm × 20.3 cm;

      • (e) two triangular, white muslin bandages, folded and compressed, each 91 cm × 96.5 cm × 137 cm;

      • (f) 10 sterile eye pads, each 4.69 cm × 6.98 cm;

      • (g) 120 mL of extra-ocular ophthalmic irrigating solution in an unbreakable bottle that shows a drug identification number and an expiry date;

      • (h) one unbreakable plastic eyewash cup;

      • (i) one wire splint, 9.5 cm × 60 cm ;

      • (j) 10 individual packs of ammonia inhalant;

      • (k) 10 pads, impregnated with povidone and iodine, that show an expiry date;

      • (l) one copy of the Pocket Guide to Emergency First Aid, in English and French, published by St. John Ambulance;

      • (m) a waterproof contents list and instruction sheet in English and French;

      • (n) six safety pins;

      • (o) one pair of stainless steel bandage scissors; and

      • (p) one roll of waterproof adhesive tape, 2.5 cm × 4.5 m.

    • (2) The first aid kit shall be placed in a container that is

      • (a) watertight;

      • (b) resealable;

      • (c) fitted with a gasket to ensure a tight seal; and

      • (d) made of a rigid plastic that is capable of withstanding temperatures of -30°C, such as acrylonitrile butadienestyrene (ABS) or high-impact polystyrene (HIPS).

  • SOR/80-685, s. 20
  • SOR/96-218, s. 35
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 48 to 50
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 5(F)

SCHEDULE II(Paragraphs 7(j), 10(l), 11(k), 12(i), 14(i), 16(1)(h) and 17(5)(d) and (e), subsection 19(9) and paragraphs 20(1)(i), 22(l), 22.1(1)(j), 22.1(2)(i), 27.2(3)(e) and (f), 27.3(i), 30(e) and (f), 39(d) and (e), 49(d) and (e), 59(c) and (d), 64(b) and (c), 70(b), 79(b), 91(c) and (d), 102(d) to (f) and 108(d) to (f))Equipment To Be Carried by Lifeboats, Rescue Boats, Emergency Boats and Suitable Boats

Lifeboat Equipment

    • 1 (1) The equipment set out in column I of the table to this subsection is the equipment required for a lifeboat carried on a ship engaged on a voyage set out in the heading of the applicable column of columns II to VII and is carried in the quantity and in conformity with the requirements set out in that applicable column.

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn IIIColumn IVColumn VColumn VIColumn VII
      ItemEquipmentInternational voyages, foreign voyages, or home-trade voyages, Class I or IIHome-trade voyages, Class III, or short international voyages that are not home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class IIInland voyages, Class IInland voyages, Class II, or minor waters voyages, Class IShort international voyages that are home-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class IHome-trade voyages, Class IV, or minor waters voyages, Class II
      1buoyant oars, unless the lifeboat is free-fallin accordance with subsection (2)in accordance with subsection (2)in accordance with subsection (2)in accordance with subsection (2)in accordance with subsection (2)in accordance with subsection (2)
      2safety boat-hook222211
      3buoyant bailer111111
      4bucket22n/an/an/an/a
      5survival manual11n/an/an/an/a
      6compass1, in accordance with subsection (3)1, in accordance with subsection (3)n/an/an/an/a
      7sea anchor1, in accordance with subsection (4)1, in accordance with subsection (4)1, in accordance with subsection (4)n/an/an/a
      8painter2, in accordance with subsection (5)2, in accordance with subsection (5)2, in accordance with subsection (5)2, in accordance with subsection (5)2, in accordance with subsection (5)2, in accordance with subsection (5)
      9hatchet222222
      10rocket parachute flare4n/an/an/an/an/a
      11red hand flare66663n/a
      12buoyant smoke signals2n/an/an/an/an/a
      13watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling111111
      14spare set of batteries and spare light bulb for item 13, in a watertight container111111
      15heliograph for signalling to ships and aircraft with instructions for its use in English and French1n/an/an/an/an/a
      16copy of life saving signals, in English and French, on a waterproof card or in a watertight container111111
      17whistle or equivalent sound signalling device1n/an/an/an/an/a
      18first aid kit1, in accordance with section 81, in accordance with section 81, in accordance with section 8n/an/an/a
      19doses of anti- seasickness medicine6 for each member of the complement6 for each member of the complementn/an/an/an/a
      20seasickness bag1 for each member of the complement1 for each member of the complementn/an/an/an/a
      21jackknife attached to the lifeboat by a lanyard11n/an/an/an/a
      22buoyant rescue quoit2, each attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line2, each attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line1 that is attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line1 that is attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line1 that is attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line1 that is attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line
      23manual bilge pump11n/an/an/an/a
      24appropriate tools to enable minor repairs to the engine and its accessoriesenough, if the lifeboat is fitted with an engineenough, if the lifeboat is fitted with an enginen/an/an/an/a
      25portable fire-extinguishing equipment suitable for extinguishing oil fires1, if the lifeboat is fitted with an engine1, if the lifeboat is fitted with an engine1, if the lifeboat is fitted with an engine1, if the lifeboat is fitted with an enginen/an/a
      26radar reflector1, unless a survival craft radar transponder is stowed in the lifeboat1, unless a survival craft radar transponder is stowed in the lifeboatn/an/an/an/a
      27water supply and dipperin accordance with subsection (6)in accordance with subsection (6)n/an/an/an/a
      28rustproof graduated drinking vessel, marked at the 30-mL, 45-mL and 60-mL levels11n/an/an/an/a
      29food rationin accordance with subsection (7)n/an/an/an/an/a
      30safety can-opener suitable for opening water and ration supplies31n/an/an/an/a
      31set of fishing tackle1n/an/an/an/an/a
      32searchlightin accordance with subsection (8)in accordance with subsection (8)n/an/an/an/a
      33thermal protective aidin accordance with subsection (9), if the ship does not carry immersion suits for the complementin accordance with subsection (9), if the ship does not carry immersion suits for the complementin accordance with subsection (9), if the ship does not carry immersion suits for the complementin accordance with subsection (9), if the ship does not carry immersion suits for the complementn/an/a
    • (2) The buoyant oars shall

      • (a) be sufficient in number to enable the complement to make headway in calm seas; and

      • (b) each be provided with thole pins, crutches or equivalent arrangements that are attached to the lifeboat by lanyards or chains.

    • (3) The compass shall be in a binnacle that

      • (a) has a means of illumination; and

      • (b) is fitted at the steering position.

    • (4) The sea anchor shall be fitted with a tripping line that can be firmly held when wet and a shock-resistant hawser, and all three shall be strong enough to withstand all sea conditions.

    • (5) The painters shall be

      • (a) made from manila or any other fibre that has a breaking strength and weathering, stretching and gripping properties at least equivalent to manila;

      • (b) not less than 25.5 mm in diameter;

      • (c) of a length not less than twice the distance from the stowage position of the lifeboat to the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition, or 15 m, whichever is greater; and

      • (d) arranged, ready for immediate use, as follows:

        • (i) one painter attached to a release device at the forward end of the lifeboat, and

        • (ii) one painter firmly secured at or near the bow of the lifeboat.

    • (6) The water supplies shall consist of

      • (a) one of the following:

        • (i) a rustproof watertight container or individually sealed units containing 3 L of fresh water for each member of the complement, or

        • (ii) a rustproof watertight container or individually sealed units containing 2 L of fresh water for each member of the complement and a desalting apparatus capable of producing 1 L of fresh water in two days for each member of the complement; and

      • (b) if the container requires a dipper to draw water from the bunghole to the container, a rustproof dipper fitted with a lanyard.

    • (7) The food ration shall

      • (a) total not less than 10 000 kJ for each member of the complement;

      • (b) be stored in airtight packaging; and

      • (c) be stowed in a watertight container showing an expiry date.

    • (8) The searchlight shall be capable of

      • (a) illuminating, for a period of six hours at night, a light-coloured object that has a width of 18 m and is at a distance of 180 m from the searchlight; and

      • (b) working for at least three hours continuously.

    • (9) Thermal protective aids shall be sufficient

      • (a) in the case of an open lifeboat, for the complement; and

      • (b) in the case of a partially enclosed or totally enclosed lifeboat, for two persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greater.

Rescue Boat and Approved Boat Equipment

    • 2 (1) The equipment set out in column I of the table to this subsection is the equipment required for a rescue boat or approved boat carried on a ship engaged on a voyage set out in the heading of the applicable column of columns II and III and is carried in the quantity and in conformity with the requirements set out in that applicable column.

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn III
      ItemEquipmentVoyages other than inland voyages, Class IInland voyages, Class I
      1buoyant oarsin accordance with subsection (3)in accordance with subsection (3)
      2buoyant bailer11
      3compass1, in accordance with subsection (4)n/a
      4sea anchor1, in accordance with subsection (5)1, in accordance with subsection (5)
      5painter1 that is attached to a release device at the forward end of the rescue boat or approved boat1 that is attached to a release device at the forward end of the rescue boat or approved boat
      6buoyant line1, in accordance with subsection (6)1, in accordance with subsection (6)
      7watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling11
      8spare set of batteries and spare light bulb for item 7, in a watertight container11
      9whistle or equivalent sound signalling device1n/a
      10buoyant rescue quoit2, each attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line1, attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line
      11searchlight1, in accordance with subsection (7)n/a
      12radar reflector1, unless a survival craft radar transponder is stowed in the rescue boat or approved boatn/a
      13first aid kit1, in accordance with section 8 of this Schedule1, in accordance with section 8 of this Schedule
      14thermal protective aidfor 2 persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greaterfor 2 persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greater
      15safety boat-hook11
      16bucket11
      17knife or hatchet11
    • (2) The equipment set out in column I of the table to this subsection is the equipment required, in addition to the equipment set out in column I of the table to subsection 2(1), for a rescue boat or approved boat with inflatable compartments carried on a ship engaged on a voyage set out in the heading of the applicable column of columns II and III and shall be carried in the quantity and in conformity with the requirements set out in that applicable column.

      TABLE

      Column IColumn IIColumn III
      ItemEquipmentVoyages other than inland voyages, Class IInland voyages, Class I
      1buoyant safety knife11
      2sponge2n/a
      3manually operated bellows or pump11
      4repair kit in a watertight container for repairing punctures11
    • (3) The buoyant oars shall

      • (a) be sufficient in number to enable the complement to make headway in calm seas; and

      • (b) each be provided with thole pins, crutches or equivalent arrangements that are attached to the rescue boat or approved boat by lanyards or chains.

    • (4) The compass shall be in a binnacle that

      • (a) has a means of illumination; and

      • (b) is fitted at the steering position.

    • (5) The sea anchor shall be fitted with a hawser and a tripping line that is not less than 10 m in length, both the hawser and the line being strong enough to withstand all sea conditions.

    • (6) The buoyant line shall be not less than 50 m in length and strong enough to tow the largest life raft carried on the ship at a speed of at least two knots when the life raft is loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (7) The searchlight shall be capable of

      • (a) illuminating, for a period of six hours at night, a light-coloured object that has a width of 18 m and is at a distance of 180 m from the searchlight; and

      • (b) working for at least three hours continuously.

  • 3. and 4 [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 51]

Emergency Boat and Suitable Boat Equipment

  • 5 Emergency boat and suitable boat equipment consists of

    • (a) buoyant oars that are

      • (i) sufficient in number to enable the complement to make headway in calm seas, and

      • (ii) each provided with thole pins, crutches or equivalent arrangements that are attached to the emergency boat or suitable boat by lanyards or chains;

    • (b) one buoyant bailer;

    • (c) [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 53]

    • (d) one painter that is placed at the forward end and attached to a release device;

    • (e) one buoyant line that is not less than 50 m in length and strong enough to tow a life raft that is loaded with 50 persons and its equipment;

    • (f) one watertight electric flashlight suitable for Morse signalling, and, in a watertight container, one spare set of batteries and one spare bulb for the flashlight;

    • (g) [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 53]

    • (h) two buoyant rescue quoits, each attached to not less than 30 m of buoyant line;

    • (i) if the ship is engaged on a voyage other than a home-trade voyage, Class IV, or a minor waters voyage, Class II, thermal protective aids for two persons or 10 per cent of the complement, whichever is greater;

    • (j) one safety boat-hook;

    • (k) if the boat is rigid, one knife or hatchet; and

    • (l) if the boat has inflatable compartments,

      • (i) one buoyant safety knife,

      • (ii) one manually operated pump or bellows, and

      • (iii) one repair kit in a watertight container for repairing punctures.

Additional Emergency Boat Equipment

    • 6 (1) Additional equipment for rigid emergency boats consists of

      • (a) one boat-hook;

      • (b) one bucket; and

      • (c) one knife or hatchet.

    • (2) Additional equipment for emergency boats with inflatable compartments consists of

      • (a) one buoyant safety knife;

      • (b) two sponges;

      • (c) one manually operated bellows or pump;

      • (d) one repair kit in a watertight container for repairing punctures; and

      • (e) one safety boat-hook.

  • 7 [Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 54]

First Aid Kits

    • 8 (1) A first aid kit that is carried on a survival craft consists, at a minimum, of

      • (a) 32 adhesive absorbent dressings, each 7.5 cm × 2.2 cm and individually wrapped;

      • (b) four bandage gauzes, each 5 cm × 4.6 m;

      • (c) eight compress bandages, each 10 cm × 10 cm with 90-cm gauze tabs;

      • (d) two sterile abdominal pads, each 15.2 cm × 20.3 cm;

      • (e) six triangular, white muslin bandages, folded and compressed, each 91 cm × 96.5 cm × 137 cm;

      • (f) 10 sterile eye pads, each 4.69 cm × 6.98 cm;

      • (g) 120 mL of extra-ocular ophthalmic irrigating solution in an unbreakable bottle that shows a drug identification number and an expiry date;

      • (h) one unbreakable plastic eyewash cup;

      • (i) one wire splint, 9.5 cm × 60 cm;

      • (j) 20 individual packs of ammonia inhalant;

      • (k) 20 pads, impregnated with povidone and iodine, that show an expiry date;

      • (l) one copy of Pocket Guide to Emergency First Aid, in English and French, published by St. John Ambulance;

      • (m) a waterproof contents list and instruction sheet in English and French;

      • (n) six safety pins;

      • (o) one pair of stainless steel bandage scissors; and

      • (p) one roll of waterproof adhesive tape, 2.5 cm × 4.5 m.

    • (2) The first aid kit shall be placed in a container that is

      • (a) watertight;

      • (b) resealable;

      • (c) fitted with a gasket to ensure a tight seal; and

      • (d) made of a rigid plastic that is capable of withstanding temperatures of -30°C, such as acrylonitrile butadienestyrene (ABS) or high-impact polystyrene (HIPS).

  • SOR/80-685, s. 21
  • SOR/96-218, s. 35
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 51 to 55
  • SOR/2006-256, ss. 12(E), 13
  • SOR/2013-235, s. 8(F)

SCHEDULE III(Section 121)Ships Distress Signals

(For lifebuoy lights see Schedule XIV)

  • 1 A Type A distress signal may be substituted for either a Type B distress signal or Type C distress signal and a Type B distress signal may be substituted for a Type C distress signal.

    • 2 (1) A Type A distress signal shall be capable of producing a single bright red star that is projected to the height required by subsection (3) by a rocket and that burns while falling, its rate of fall being controlled by a parachute to 4.6 m/s.

    • (2) The star referred to in subsection (1) shall burn with a luminosity of not less than 25 000 cd for a period of not less than 40 s.

    • (3) Where a Type A distress signal is fired approximately vertically, the star and the parachute shall be ejected at or before the top of the trajectory at a height of not less than 230 m and the star shall burn out at a height of not less than 45 m from seal level.

    • (4) A Type A distress signal shall be capable of functioning in accordance with subsections (1) and (2) when fired at an angle of 45° to the horizontal.

    • (5) The parachute referred to in subsection (1) shall be attached to the star by a flexible fireproof harness.

    • (6) The rocket referred to in subsection (1) shall be ignited by a suitable external ignition method.

    • (7) The ignition device and external surface of the rocket referred to in subsection (1) shall be suitably waterproofed and the entire Type A distress signal, including the ignition and the rocket, shall be packed in a waterproof container.

    • 3 (1) A Type B distress signal shall be capable of producing, in rapid succession and at intervals not greater than 15 s, two or more red stars that are projected to a height of not less than 90 m.

    • (2) Each star referred to in subsection (1) shall burn with a luminosity of not less than 5 000 cd for a period of not less than 4 s, and shall burn out before touching the sea.

    • (3) A Type B distress signal shall

      • (a) contain a firing device capable of throwing the stars automatically; or

      • (b) be provided with a cartridge-firing device that requires loading for each star.

    • (4) Where a Type B distress signal contains a cartridge-firing device, the ship shall carry a sufficient number of cartridges to produce the number of stars required by subsection (1).

    • (5) A Type B distress signal, including the firing device and the cartridges, if any, shall be suitably waterproofed and packed in a waterproof container.

    • 4 (1) A Type C distress signal shall consist of a flare that is

      • (a) capable of producing

        • (i) a bright red light having a luminosity of not less than 15 000 cd for a period of at least 1 min,

        • (ii) a bright red light having a luminosity of not less than 500 cd for a period of at least 2 min, or

        • (iii) a bright red light having such luminosity less than 15 000 cd but not less than 500 cd for such period greater than 1 min as is satisfactory to the Board; and

      • (b) sheathed to prevent any dripping of burning material.

    • (2) The external surface of each Type C distress signal shall be suitably waterproofed and each signal shall be packed in a waterproof container.

  • 5 A distress signal and its appliances shall be considered as suitably waterproofed if they are capable of functioning properly after immersion in water for 1 minute.

  • 6 Every distress signal shall be permanently marked with the month and year of manufacture, as well as its lot number.

  • 7 The instructions for operating a distress signal shall be permanently marked thereon in both official languages or the signal shall carry a diagram clearly showing the manner of operation of the signal.

  • 8 No distress signal shall be considered as meeting the requirements of this Schedule if four years or more have elapsed since the date of manufacture.

  • SOR/80-685, ss. 22 to 24
  • SOR/96-218, s. 36
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 56
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 14

SCHEDULE IV(Sections 118 and 119)Servicing Requirements for Inflatable Survival Equipment

Service Stations and Spaces

    • 1 (1) Every service station that services inflatable survival equipment shall have

      • (a) a minimum of three separate areas or rooms each of which is used exclusively for one of the following activities or groups of activities:

        • (i) the repair of glass fibre containers,

        • (ii) the servicing and repair of inflatable survival equipment and the painting of compressed gas cylinders, and

        • (iii) the delivery of inflatable survival equipment and the storage of repair materials and spare parts;

      • (b) a separate, safe and secure magazine, well away from the service and storage spaces, for the storage of spare or date-expired pyrotechnic distress signals;

      • (c) a storage space with a means to ensure that containers containing inflatable survival equipment are not

        • (i) stored in more than two tiers unless supported by shelving, or

        • (ii) subjected to loads that may damage or otherwise adversely affect the containers; and

      • (d) readily available

    • (2) The area or room in a service station that is used for servicing inflatable survival equipment shall

      • (a) be fully enclosed and provide ample room for all of the inflatable survival equipment being serviced at any one time, including sufficient headroom for the inversion of the inflatable survival equipment when it is inflated;

      • (b) have a clean floor surface that is smooth enough to ensure that no damage occurs to the equipment being serviced;

      • (c) be well lit but with no direct sunlight entering the space;

      • (d) have such a temperature and relative humidity as to ensure that the quality of the equipment, repairs or maintenance is not adversely affected; and

      • (e) be well ventilated and free from draughts.

    • (3) Smoking is not allowed in the service spaces or packing areas.

Servicing of Inflatable Survival Equipment

    • 2 (1) Inflatable survival equipment shall be serviced annually in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturer of the equipment.

    • (1.1) Despite subsection (1), the interval between servicing may be two years if

      • (a) the ship on which the inflatable survival equipment is carried

        • (i) is not a Safety Convention ship, and

        • (ii) operates for less than seven months per year;

      • (b) fewer than 15 years have elapsed since the inflatable survival equipment was manufactured;

      • (c) the validity period of the most recent hydrostatic test of the gas cylinders of the inflatable survival equipment will not expire before the next servicing;

      • (d) the inflatable survival equipment is stored in a dry location during the months in which the ship is not in operation.

    • (1.2) Despite subsection (1), the interval between servicing may be up to but not more than 30 months if

      • (a) the ship on which the inflatable survival equipment is carried is not a Safety Convention ship;

      • (b) the manufacturer of the inflatable survival equipment recommends an extended interval between servicing of up to but not more than 30 months; and

      • (c) the extended interval between servicing provides a level of safety at least equivalent to that provided by annual servicing.

    • (2) All of the tests and procedures recommended by the manufacturer of inflatable survival equipment shall be carried out each time the equipment is serviced.

  • 3 The opening, testing, repairing and repacking of inflatable survival equipment shall be carried out in accordance with the recommendations of the manufacturer of the equipment, and shall include an inspection for signs of

    • (a) damage to the equipment container; or

    • (b) dampness in the interior of the equipment container and the equipment.

    • 4 (1) A gas inflation test shall be carried out every five years.

    • (2) When a gas inflation test is being carried out, special attention shall be paid to the effectiveness of the pressure relief valves.

    • (3) After gas inflation has been initiated, sufficient time shall be allowed to enable the pressure in the buoyancy compartments of the inflatable survival equipment to become stabilized and any solid particles of carbon dioxide to evaporate.

    • (4) After the time referred to in subsection (3) has elapsed, the buoyancy compartments shall, if necessary, be topped up with air and the inflatable survival equipment subjected to a pressure-holding test over a period of not less than one hour, during which time the pressure drop shall not exceed 5 per cent of the working pressure.

    • 5 (1) Inflatable survival equipment shall be subjected to the necessary additional pressure test set out in subsection (2) or any other similar test recommended by the manufacturer

      • (a) during the first servicing of the equipment;

      • (b) whenever a visual inspection indicates that a necessary additional pressure test should be carried out to ensure the safety and reliability of the equipment; and

      • (c) at each servicing of the equipment after its tenth year in service.

    • (2) A necessary additional pressure test shall be conducted by

      • (a) plugging the pressure relief valves;

      • (b) gradually raising the pressure to the lesser of

        • (i) twice the working pressure, and

        • (ii) a pressure that is sufficient to impose a tensile load on the compartment fabric of at least 20 per cent of the minimum tensile strength recommended by the manufacturer;

      • (c) after five minutes, checking that there is no significant pressure drop, seam slippage, cracking or other defects;

      • (d) if there is no audible cracking in the buoyancy compartments, reducing the pressure in all of the buoyancy compartments simultaneously by removing the plugs from the pressure relief valves; and

      • (e) after sufficient time has elapsed for the equipment to regain fabric tension at the working pressure, subjecting the equipment to a pressure-holding test over a period of not less than one hour, during which time the pressure drop shall not exceed 5 per cent of the working pressure.

    • (3) If, at any time during the necessary additional pressure test, there is audible cracking in the buoyancy compartments, the equipment shall be withdrawn from service.

    • 6 (1) Where a gas inflation test or a necessary additional pressure test is not required as part of a particular servicing, inflatable survival equipment shall be removed from its container and from any fitted retaining straps and subjected to a working pressure test.

    • (2) A working pressure test shall be conducted by

      • (a) inflating the inflatable survival equipment with dry compressed air to the working pressure; and

      • (b) subjecting the inflatable survival equipment to a pressure-holding test over a period of not less than one hour, during which time the pressure drop shall not exceed 5 per cent of the working pressure.

    • (3) If, during a working pressure test, the ambient temperature varies by more than 3°C, the results shall be disregarded and the test repeated.

  • 7 The seams of inflatable survival equipment shall be inspected and tested during the first servicing of the equipment and each servicing of the equipment after its tenth year in service, by

    • (a) inspecting both sides of the bottom seams of a life raft;

    • (b) inspecting the seams of a marine evacuation system with the system fully deployed;

    • (c) inspecting the seams between the floor and the buoyancy compartments of inflatable survival equipment for slippage or edge lifting; and

    • (d) after completion of each inspection referred to in paragraph (c), supporting the buoyancy chamber at a suitable height above the service floor, having a person weighing not less than 75 kg walk or crawl around the entire circumference of the floor of the equipment and inspecting the floor seams a second time.

  • 8 At every second servicing, a davit-launched life raft shall be subjected to a 10-per-cent overload suspension test that is carried out in such a way that abrasive material is not introduced into the life raft.

  • 9 At each servicing of inflatable survival equipment, the emergency pack shall be inspected to ensure that it is in good condition and that its expiry date will not pass before the next scheduled servicing.

  • 10 Where a Class II EPIRB is packed in an inflatable life raft, it shall be tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions each time the life raft is serviced.

  • 11 Inflatable survival equipment and its emergency pack shall be inspected when they are repacked after inspection or servicing to ensure that they, and the air around them, are dry.

  • 12 At every servicing of inflatable survival equipment and its emergency pack, the markings required by these Regulations to be placed on the equipment or the pack shall be checked and updated.

    • 13 (1) An accredited service technician shall prepare a record of the servicing of each piece of inflatable survival equipment, setting out

      • (a) the name of the ship or person to whom the service station sends the equipment after servicing;

      • (b) the name of the accredited service technician in charge of servicing;

      • (c) the model and serial number of the equipment;

      • (d) the date of servicing;

      • (e) the type of container for the equipment;

      • (f) the medium of inflation used;

      • (g) the tests carried out on the equipment;

      • (h) details of any repair made to the equipment;

      • (i) the date of the last hydrostatic test of the gas cylinders;

      • (j) the date of servicing of the hydrostatic release unit;

      • (k) in the case of an inflatable davit-launched life raft, the date of servicing of the release hook;

      • (l) the date of the most recent test of the Class II EPIRB;

      • (m) the class of the emergency pack;

      • (n) a list of all of the items in the emergency pack that were replaced;

      • (o) details of any defects in the equipment revealed during servicing; and

      • (p) a list of any equipment withdrawn from service.

    • (2) The record shall be kept for at least 10 years after the date of servicing of the piece of inflatable survival equipment and shall be made available to an inspector on request.

Responsibilities of Manufacturers and Service Stations

    • 14 (1) Every manufacturer of inflatable survival equipment is responsible for

      • (a) ensuring that the equipment is designed in such a way that, if an accredited service technician follows the requirements of this Schedule and the manufacturer’s servicing manual, including any additional instructions for servicing a particular product or model, the equipment will be adequately serviced;

      • (b) ensuring that every service station that it accredits is designed, organized and maintained so as not to compromise the integrity of the equipment that is serviced there;

      • (c) ensuring that every service technician whom it accredits to service its equipment is a qualified person whom the manufacturer has adequately trained;

      • (d) keeping the Board informed of the names of the service stations and service technicians that are accredited by the manufacturer and providing the Board with not less than eight weeks notice before any accreditation ends;

      • (e) making available to its accredited service stations

        • (i) changes to its servicing manuals, servicing bulletins and instructions,

        • (ii) appropriate repair materials and replacement parts, and

        • (iii) bulletins and instructions from the Board;

      • (f) keeping the Board informed of

        • (i) any shipping casualties that are known to the manufacturer and involve its equipment, and

        • (ii) any failures of the manufacturer’s equipment, other than failures that occur during inspections; and

      • (g) informing ship owners whenever possible of any deficiency or danger that is known to the manufacturer and is related to the use of the manufacturer’s equipment and taking appropriate remedial measures.

    • (2) Every manufacturer shall include in its servicing manuals tables of exact necessary additional pressure test pressures corresponding to the buoyancy compartment sizes and material tensile strength requirements of its inflatable survival equipment, determined by the formula

      NAP = (2T/25d)

      where

      NAP
      is the necessary additional pressure measured in kg/cm2;
      T
      is the material tensile strength of the inflatable survival equipment measured in kg/5 cm width of fabric; and
      d
      is the diameter of the buoyancy compartment in cm.
  • 15 The owner of an accredited service station shall ensure that

    • (a) inflatable survival equipment is serviced by an accredited service technician in accordance with the manufacturer’s required service checklist;

    • (b) a copy of the manufacturer’s service checklist for any inflatable survival equipment that is serviced by the service station, dated and signed by the accredited service technician, is provided to an inspector on request;

    • (c) after each servicing of inflatable survival equipment, a certificate, dated and signed by the accredited service technician, is provided to the ship owner, and sets out

      • (i) the name of the ship,

      • (ii) the name of the ship owner,

      • (iii) the model, serial number and type of container of the equipment,

      • (iv) the name of the manufacturer,

      • (v) the number of the gas cylinder and type of gas,

      • (vi) the class of the emergency pack,

      • (vii) the expiry date of the pyrotechnic distress signals, and

      • (viii) the following statement:

        “This is to certify that the inflatable survival equipment described above has been inflated, tested, inspected, serviced, repaired and properly repacked, all in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations for this make and model of equipment and in accordance with the Life Saving Equipment Regulations”;

    • (d) the gas cylinder is sent to a recharging plant for servicing when

      • (i) the gas charge is below the specified weight,

      • (ii) the gas cylinder is due for requalification as required under Part 5 of the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations,

      • (iii) servicing is recommended by the gas cylinder manufacturer, or

      • (iv) the condition of the gas cylinder causes any doubt as to its safety or efficiency;

    • (e) the threads of a gas cylinder that is sent by the service station for servicing are capped or otherwise protected from damage; and

    • (f) after the servicing of a gas cylinder, a certificate dated and signed by a person authorized by the plant that serviced the gas cylinder is provided to the service station, and sets out

      • (i) the type of charge,

      • (ii) the date of recharging,

      • (iii) the tare weight, the net weight and the full weight,

      • (iv) the date of the most recent hydrostatic test,

      • (v) the name of the recharging plant, and

      • (vi) the following statement:

        “This is to certify that the gas cylinder bearing serial number blank line has been examined internally and externally, placed in good condition, charged with the specified weights of non-toxic gas or gases and checked for leakage.”

  • SOR/78-561, s. 1
  • SOR/80-685, ss. 25 to 29
  • SOR/96-218, s. 37
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 22
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 57, 76(F)
  • SOR/2002-122, s. 8
  • SOR/2004-26, s. 30
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 6

SCHEDULE V(Section 121)Lifeboat Standards for Existing Ships

PART IGeneral Requirements

    • 1 (1) Lifeboats of Class 1 shall be open boats constructed with rigid sides and fitted with internal buoyancy appliances only, in accordance with Part III of this Schedule.

    • (2) Lifeboats of Class 2 shall be open boats constructed in accordance with the requirements for a Class 1 lifeboat, but not fitted with internal buoyancy appliances, except in the case of lifeboats constructed of non-buoyant material, as described in Part III of this Schedule.

    • (3) Except where otherwise specified, a lifeboat shall be not less than 4.9 m in length.

    • (4) To facilitate aerial observation, all upper surfaces of a lifeboat shall be a highly visible shade of orange or yellow.

    • (5) Notwithstanding subsections (1) and (2), a lifeboat with a rigid shelter may be approved if the lifeboat can be readily opened from both inside and outside, and the shelter does not impede rapid embarkation and disembarkation or the launching and handling of the lifeboat.

    • (6) A motor lifeboat that is fitted with means for preventing the entry of water at the fore end may be approved.

    • 2 (1) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 40]

    • (2) Every lifeboat shall have affixed to it retro-reflective tape that is

      • (a) manufactured in accordance with

        • (i) CGSB Specification

          • (A) No. 62-GP-11 for the type prescribed therein with the highest level of reflectivity, or

          • (B) No. 62-GP-12

          for all rigid surfaces, and

        • (ii) CGSB Specification No. 62-GP-12 for all flexible surfaces; and

      • (b) arranged as shown in the following diagrams.

        GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE C.R.C., C. 1436, PP. 12351 AND 12352

    • (3) The retro-reflective tape referred to in subsection (2) shall be in sections

      • (a) not less than 50 mm in width;

      • (b) not less than 300 mm in length;

      • (c) so spaced that the distance between the centres of adjacent sections is not more than 500 mm; and

      • (d) fitted

        • (i) on top of the gunwale as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection,

        • (ii) on the outside of the lifeboat as near the gunwale as possible, as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection, and

        • (iii) on the top of the canopy or exposure cover, in the form of crosses as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection.

    • (4) The canopy or exposure cover shall not obscure the retro-reflective tape sections on the side of the lifeboat.

    • 3 (1) Lifeboats shall be properly constructed for the purpose for which they are intended and shall be of such form and proportions as to have ample stability in a seaway, and sufficient freeboard when loaded with their full complement of persons and equipment.

    • (2) All lifeboats shall be capable of maintaining positive stability when open to the sea and loaded with their full complement of persons and equipment.

    • 4 (1) The weight of a lifeboat when fully laden with persons and equipment shall not exceed 20.32 t.

    • (2) A person shall be deemed to weigh 75 kg for the purposes of this schedule and two children under the age of 12 years shall be equated to one person.

    • 5 (1) Notwithstanding Part IV of the Schedule a lifeboat approved for the accommodation of more than 60 persons but not more than 100 persons may, in lieu of complying with that Part, comply with Part V of this Schedule.

    • (2) No lifeboat shall accommodate more than 150 persons.

  • 6 For the purpose of determining the number of persons that a lifeboat can accommodate, each person shall be assumed to be an adult and to be wearing a lifejacket.

    • 7 (1) When an Inspector has satisfied himself that the construction of a new lifeboat is in accordance with the approved plan and is in all respects, satisfactory, he shall cause the following details to be marked on the stem or sheer-strake thereof in permanent characters, clearly visible and as nearly as practicable 75 mm in height:

      • (a) length, breadth and depth, in metres and tenths;

      • (b) the number of persons the lifeboat is approved to carry;

      • (c) the date of final inspection; and

      • (d) his initials.

    • (2) In the case of an existing unmarked lifeboat, or other equipment that has been accepted by the Board as a lifeboat, the inspector concerned shall, if satisfied that all conditions stipulated by the Board have been met, mark such lifeboat or equipment in accordance with paragraphs (1)(a), (b) and (d).

    • (3) Every lifeboat shall be marked,

      • (a) on each bow, with the name of the ship and port of registry to which it belongs; and

      • (b) where the ship has a muster list, with a number corresponding to the appropriate lifeboat number shown on the muster list.

  • 8 The Board will consider for approval lifeboats made of aluminum, glass reinforced plastic, moulded plywood or other suitable material.

  • 9 No lifeboat shall be deemed fit to carry more than 60 persons unless it is a motor lifeboat or a mechanically propelled lifeboat.

  • 10 Lifeboats built outside Canada may be accepted as equipment complying with these Regulations if they are

    • (a) approved by the British Board of Trade and British Board of Trade certificates are provided therefor;

    • (b) built in the United States under special arrangement with the United States Coast Guard; or

    • (c) built in accordance with plans approved by the Board and certificated by the Government authority of the country in which they are built.

  • 11 Repairs to lifeboats shall comply with the construction requirements or be of equivalent standard.

PART IICarrying Capacity

  • 12 The cubic capacity of a lifeboat shall be measured in cubic metres and, subject to section 15, may be determined by Stirling’s (Simpson’s) Rule, where

    Cubic Capacity = L/12 (4A + 2B + 4C)

    where L denotes the length of the lifeboat in metres from the inside of the planking or plating at the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post or to the inside of the transom where the lifeboat has a square stern, and where A, B and C denote respectively the area of the cross-sections at the quarter-length forward, amidships and the quarter-length aft, that correspond to the 3 points obtained by dividing L into 4 equal parts (the areas corresponding to the ends of the boat being considered negligible), and the areas A, B and C shall be deemed to be given in square metres by the successive application of the following formula to each of the 3 cross-sections:

    Area = h/12 (a + 4b + 2c + 4d + e)

    where h denotes the depth measured in metres inside the planking or plating, from the keel to the level of the gunwale or a greater depth, as determined in sections 13 and 14, and a, b, c, d and e denote the horizontal breadths of the lifeboat measured in metres inside the planking or plating at the upper and lower points of the depth and at the 3 points obtained by dividing h into 4 equal parts (a and e being the breadths at the extreme points, and c at the middle point of h), the capacity of a square sterned lifeboat being calculated as if the lifeboat had a pointed stern.

  • 13 If the sheer of the gunwale, measured at the two points situated at a quarter of the length of the lifeboat from the ends, exceeds one per cent of the length, the depth used in calculating the area of cross-sections A and C in section 12 shall be deemed to be the depth amidships plus one per cent of the length of the lifeboat.

  • 14 If the depth of the lifeboat amidships exceeds 45 per cent of the breadth, the depth used in calculating the area of the midship cross-section B shall be deemed to be equal to 45 per cent of the breadth, and the depth used in calculating the areas of the quarter-length sections A and C is obtained by increasing the last figure by an amount equal to one per cent of the length of the lifeboat, but in no case shall the depths used in the calculation exceed the actual depths at these points.

  • 15 Unless the owner of a lifeboat requires the cubic capacity of the lifeboat to be determined in accordance with section 12, the cubic capacity may be assumed to be that determined by using the formula

    • (a) L x B x D x 0.6; or

    • (b) in the case of lifeboats other than planked wooden lifeboats, L x B x D x 0.64;

    where L is the length measured from the intersection of the outside of the planking with the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post, or to the after side of the transom, and B is the greatest breadth at the outside of the planking and D is the depth amidships inside the planking from the keel to the level of the gunwale but in any case does not exceed 45 per cent of the breadth.

  • 16 The following table shows the dimensions and cubic capacity of standard lifeboats where the cubic capacity of a lifeboat is determined by using one of the formulae specified in section 15 of this Schedule:

    TABLE

    LengthBreadthDepthCubic
    (metres)(metres)(metres)(metres)
    9.12.741.1417.055
    8.82.671.1015.507
    8.52.591.0714.134
    8.22.511.0412.843
    7.92.440.9911.450
    7.62.360.9610.331
    7.32.290.919.127
    7.02.290.888.464
    6.72.210.847.463
    6.42.130.826.707
    6.12.060.795.956
    5.81.980.765.237
    5.51.910.734.601
    5.21.830.724.111
    4.91.750.703.602
  • 17 The following table shows the dimensions and cubic capacity of lifeboats other than standard lifeboats:

    TABLE

    LengthBreadthDepthCubic
    (metres)(metres)(metres)(metres)
    4.61.680.673.107
    4.61.680.612.828
    4.31.600.592.436
    4.01.520.562.043
    3.71.450.551.770
    3.71.310.491.425
    3.41.370.521.453
    • 18 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the number of persons that may be carried in a lifeboat shall be determined by dividing the cubic capacity by the following units:

      TABLE

      Length of Lifeboat

      (metres)

      Unit for Ships making Home-Trade IV or Minor Waters II VoyagesUnit for Ships making Voyages other than Home-Trade IV and Minor Waters II
      7.3 or more blank line.2832.2832
      6.7 blank line.2832.3115
      6.1 blank line.2832.3398
      5.5 blank line.2832.3681
      4.9 and under blank line.3398.3964
    • (2) Where the depth of a lifeboat exceeds 1.22 m, the number of persons permitted in accordance with this section shall be reduced in the proportion of 1.22 m to the actual depth unless the lifeboat can successfully pass the flotation tests prescribed by Part III of this schedule.

  • 19 The number of persons that may be carried in a dory shall be determined in accordance with the following table:

    TABLE

    Length of DoryNumber of Passengers, if any, in ship
    (metres)More than 1212 or less
    3.7 blank line23
    4.3 blank line34
    4.6 blank line34
    4.9 blank line45
    5.2 blank line45
    5.5 blank line66
    5.8 blank line66
  • 20 The number of persons that may be carried in a motor lifeboat shall be determined in the manner provided in section 18 of this Part and in Part IV of this Schedule.

PART III

Construction and Tests

  • 21 Lifeboats shall be inspected during construction by an inspector and air cases, where fitted, shall be tested by submersion or other means suitable for detecting leaks.

  • 22 The prototype of a lifeboat, other than a glass reinforced plastic lifeboat, shall be subjected to the following tests:

    • (a) it shall be suspended by the lifting hooks or releasing gear, the length, breadth and depth measured, and evenly distributed weights shall then be placed in the boat equal to the weight of

      • (i) the proposed complement,

      • (ii) the equipment, and

      • (iii) 25 per cent of the lifeboat, complement and equipment,

      and after the weights are removed there shall be no appreciable permanent set as a result of this test; and

    • (b) a number of persons equal to the complement, each wearing a lifejacket, shall be seated in the lifeboat and the inspector shall satisfy himself that

      • (i) the oars or other means of propulsion can be handled and operated, and

      • (ii) upon all persons on one side of the centre line of the lifeboat disembarking, such persons being at least 50 per cent of the complement, the low side freeboard shall be not less than 10 per cent of the depth of the lifeboat with all persons remaining in the lifeboat maintaining their positions on one side of the centre line.

    • 23 (1) A lifeboat shall have a mean sheer at least equal to four per cent of its length, and a rise of floor of 125 mm per metre of beam.

    • (2) The form of a lifeboat shall be such that the half-girth amidships, measured over the planking from the centre of the keel to the top of the gunwale, shall be not less than 88 per cent of the sum of half the breadth amidships and the inside depth amidships, and the half-girth at the quarter lengths forward and aft shall be not less than 80 per cent of that sum.

Buoyancy

  • 24 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 1 wooden lifeboat shall be

    • (a) so placed in the lifeboat as to secure stability when the lifeboat is fully laden under adverse weather conditions; and

    • (b) equal in volume to at least 10 per cent of the cubic capacity of the lifeboat, but in a lifeboat approved for 100 or more persons the volume shall be increased as the Board may prescribe.

  • 25 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 1 lifeboat constructed of non-buoyant material shall be of a volume at least equal to that required for an equal-size wooden lifeboat, plus an additional volume of 0.049 m3 for every 50 kg of non-buoyant material used in the construction of the lifeboat, but the required buoyancy may be reduced by the Board where it is found that due to the specific gravity of the material a lesser buoyancy would be sufficient.

  • 26 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 2 lifeboat constructed of non-buoyant material shall have a volume of 0.056 m3 for every 50 kg of non-buoyant material used in the construction of the lifeboat, but the required buoyancy may be reduced by the Board where it is found that due to the specific gravity of the material a lesser buoyancy would be sufficient.

  • 27 Buoyancy appliances shall consist of metal air cases or other approved appliances.

  • 28 Buoyancy appliances consisting of metal air cases shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) they shall be constructed of annealed copper or yellow metal weighing not less than 5.5 kg/m2 but 18 B.W.G. galvanized iron or galvanized steel cases riveted and welded may be used for fresh water voyages only;

    • (b) hook joints at least 9.5 mm wide and well hammered down and soldered shall be used, and shall be double on longitudinal seams and single at the ends;

    • (c) no air case shall exceed 1 220 mm in length;

    • (d) any air case exceeding 990 mm in length, if not constructed of corrugated material, shall be fitted at mid-length with an internal diaphragm or stiffener of either metal similar to that of the case or wood, but the walls of the case shall not be pierced to effect the attachment of the diaphragm to the case; and

    • (e) plugs or nipples fitted for testing purposes shall be of non-corrodible material.

  • 29 Buoyancy appliances other than metal air cases shall be

    • (a) at least as buoyant as metal air cases of similar size;

    • (b) proof against deterioration by petroleum products and by the elements; and

    • (c) constructed of a material tested in accordance with A.S.T.M. D-1692.

Tables

  • 30 The scantlings and types of materials used in the construction of wooden lifeboats shall be in accordance with Table I to this Schedule, but the following native grown materials may be substituted:

    • (a) in Nova Scotia,

      • (i) the keel, sternpost, timbers, gunwale and hog piece may be oak,

      • (ii) the stem may be juniper or oak,

      • (iii) the thwart knees and breast hooks may be oak or juniper crooks,

      • (iv) the planking may be white pine, and

      • (v) the sheerstrake may be oak;

    • (b) in Ontario,

      • (i) the keel, stem, sternpost, timbers, gunwales, hog piece, thwart knees and breast hooks may be oak,

      • (ii) the planking may be white pine, cypress or cedar, and

      • (iii) the sheerstrake may be oak;

    • (c) in British Columbia,

      • (i) the thwart knees may be vine maple,

      • (ii) the stem, sternpost and keel may be gum wood,

      • (iii) the planking may be B.C. cedar or pine, and

      • (iv) the sheerstrake may be oak.

Lifting Hooks

    • 31 (1) Lifeboat lifting hooks and their attachments shall be in accordance with Tables III, IV, V, VI and VII to this Schedule, but alternatives to the requirements set out in Table VII will be given consideration by the Board.

    • (2) Where lifeboat lifting hooks are not in a vertical line with the falls, Type A keel connections as shown in Table V to this Schedule shall be used and the gangboards shall be slotted.

    • (3) In steel lifeboats the lifting hooks shall be connected to sling plates secured to the keel or centre girder by riveting or some other approved method of fastening.

    • (4) Where the fitting of lifeboat disengaging gear is adopted in lieu of standard lifting hooks, it shall comply with Part VI of this Schedule.

Wooden Lifeboats

  • 32 Wood used in the construction of lifeboats shall be of best quality, free from sapwood, checks and objectionable knots.

    • 33 (1) Stems and sternposts shall be rabbeted so as to receive the butt edges of the planks and to permit caulking but the length of the rabbet shall not exceed the thickness of the plank.

    • (2) Stems and sternposts shall not project above the gunwale more than is necessary for the securing of the upper breast hook and shall be so shaped so as to minimize risk of fouling by rope or wreckage.

  • 34 Aprons shall provide a 75 mm faying surface for the plank ends and shall be capable of receiving the required double fastenings therefor.

  • 35 Deadwoods shall be properly scarphed to apron and keelson.

    • 36 (1) Keels shall be in one length and shall be scarphed, vertically or horizontally, to stem and sternpost.

    • (2) Vertical scarphs shall be secured by five clenched nails and horizontal or flat scarphs shall be properly lipped and secured by at least two through fastenings.

  • 37 Stem bands shall be galvanized iron and shall extend from the breast hook over the stem head to the keel plate or 610 mm abaft the scarph.

  • 38 Planking in clinker-built lifeboats shall not exceed 140 mm in width, except that the four strakes next to the keel may be

    • (a) two at 178 mm,

    • (b) one at 165 mm, and

    • (c) one at 152 mm,

    but in lifeboats 5.5 m in length and under, these dimensions shall be reduced by 25 mm.

  • 39 Planking in clinker-built lifeboats shall be in long lengths with

    • (a) efficient shift of butts;

    • (b) at least two strakes between butts in the same timber space; and

    • (c) landings of at least 19 mm.

  • 40 Proposals for the construction of carved-built lifeboats may be considered by the Board.

  • 41 Timbers shall be bent to shape and fitted in one length from gunwale to gunwale, except at the extreme ends of the lifeboat and shall not exceed 152 mm centre to centre.

  • 42 Keelsons shall be in one length and shall overlap the deadwoods to take the sling plates.

  • 43 Keelsons shall not be cut to form a mast socket.

    • 44 (1) Bilge stringers and risings shall, where possible, be fitted in one length and secured at each timber with either a through fastening or a brass screw.

    • (2) Where bilge stringers and risings are fitted in more than one length, they shall be scarphed at the joints and backed by hardwood filling pieces between the scarph and the planking.

  • 45 Box gunwales consisting of the timber heads connected through the gunwale and sheerstrake and capped over shall be fitted in lifeboats 7.6 m in length or over.

  • 46 Gunwales shall be fitted aft with an arrangement for the steering oar and forward with a fair-lead to facilitate towing.

  • 47 Thwarts shall be fitted as low in the lifeboat as practicable and not less than the following distance below the gunwale:

    • (a) 230 mm in lifeboats 6.7 m in length and under;

    • (b) 254 mm in lifeboats over 6.7 m in length but not over 8.5 m; or

    • (c) 280 mm in lifeboats over 8.5 m in length.

  • 48 Thwarts having an unsupported length exceeding 1 525 mm shall be supported by stanchions to the keelson.

  • 49 Thwarts shall be attached to the risings with two screws at each end and shall be notched at the timbers.

  • 50 Side benches shall be continuous, permanent and fitted in as long lengths as possible.

  • 51 Gangboards shall be of the same dimensions and materials as the thwarts.

  • 52 Stretchers or lower cross seats to facilitate efficient rowing shall be fitted where necessary and, where fitted, they shall be portable.

  • 53 The casings enclosing the buoyancy appliances shall be removable and in way of the thwarts shall be strong enough to provide support.

  • 54 A plughole, so placed as to drain the lifeboat, shall be provided.

  • 55 Thwart knees shall be connected to the thwarts and to the side of the lifeboat by at least two fastenings through each arm and a hardwood chock shall be fitted below the gunwale between the vertical arm and the planking.

    • 56 (1) Breast hooks shall be of galvanized iron or oak grown to form and shall have the same scantlings as thwart knees.

    • (2) The arms of a breast hook shall extend for at least two timber spaces and shall each be through fastened by two bolts with one additional bolt through the throat.

    • (3) Lifeboats up to 7.3 m in length shall be fitted with one breast hook at each end at the level of the gunwale.

    • (4) Lifeboats over 7.3 m in length shall be fitted with two breast hooks at each end, the upper breast hook at the level of the gunwale and the lower breast hook 380 mm lower.

  • 57 Rubbers shall be fitted to all lifeboats and shall be through fastened at alternate timbers.

  • 58 Clinker-built lifeboats shall have filling pieces fitted against the plank edges from gunwale to bilge for one-third of the lifeboat’s length amidships.

    • 59 (1) Lifeboats shall be fitted with bilge keels or rails extending over the midship half of the lifeboat and secured to a doubling plank fastened to the planking and timbers.

    • (2) Bilge keel fastenings shall not penetrate the bottom planking.

  • 60 Lifeboat fastenings shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) fastenings of the keel, stem, sternpost, aprons, knees, keelson and deadwoods shall be through fastenings or, where this is impracticable, long screws;

    • (b) the hog piece shall be secured to the keel by galvanized screws 150 mm apart;

    • (c) the keelson shall be secured to the keel by through fastenings 610 mm apart;

    • (d) through bolts shall be galvanized and of not less than

      • (i) 9.5 mm diameter in lifeboats under 4.9 m in length,

      • (ii) 12.5 mm diameter in lifeboats between 4.9 and 7.3 m in length, and

      • (iii) 14 mm diameter in lifeboats over 7.3 m in length;

    • (e) plank fastenings shall be copper, properly clenched on rooves with one through each timber and one between in each edge plank in clinker-built lifeboats;

    • (f) plank scarphs shall be double fastened by at least five clenched nails in each row;

    • (g) plank edge fastenings shall have a maximum spacing of 75 mm; and

    • (h) fastenings shall not be made into end grain timber.

Steel Lifeboats

  • 61 The scantlings and materials for steel lifeboats shall comply with Table II to this Schedule.

    • 62 (1) Plating for shell, floors and like parts shall be made by the open-hearth or electric furnace process in accordance with A.S.T.M. Standard Specification A93 and the bend tests required by the specifications shall be made after the galvanizing or other anti-corrosive treatment has been applied.

    • (2) Rivets and rolled or extruded shapes such as the keel, stem, sternpost and gunwale shall be made by the open-hearth or electric furnace process in accordance with A.S.T.M. Standard Specification A7 but consideration will be given to the use of other steel having equivalent strength where longitudinal cold forming is necessary.

    • 63 (1) Riveting of shell plating shall be reduced to a minimum and all seams and butts shall be secured by electrical or other approved welding process.

    • (2) All welding shall be carried out before the material is galvanized or zinc sprayed.

    • (3) Faying surfaces of riveted plates, seams and angles shall be well coated with a protective covering to exclude moisture and, in addition, where watertightness is necessary, painted water-excluding material shall be inserted between the faying surfaces of riveted seams.

    • (4) Where riveting is employed in the construction of the shell, double riveting shall be used and the centres of the rivets in the row nearest the edge of the sheet shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm from the edge.

    • (5) Rivets shall be staggered with not less than 59 rivets to the metre and shall have countersunk heads and the diameter of the rivets shall be not less than that shown in the following table:

      TABLE

      Plating Thickness

      U.S.S.G.

      Rivet Diameter

      (millimetres)

      183
      163
      144
      134
      125
    • (6) Riveting of the shell plating to the keel, stem and sternpost shall be by botton head rivets, staggered with not less than 39 rivets to the metre and the distance from the edge of the plate to the centres of the rivets in the nearest rows shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm.

    • (7) Rivets connecting the shell to the gunwale shall be spaced not more than 75 mm on centres and the size of the rivets for connecting the shell plating to the keel, stem, sternpost and gunwale shall be 6 mm diameter for boats 8.5 m in length and under and 8 mm diameter for boats over 8.5 m in length.

    • (8) The connection of the floors to the shell shall be by a single row of rivets not less than 5 mm diameter and spaced not more than 75 mm on centres.

    • 64 (1) The keel, stem and sternpost shall be in not more than two lengths except in the case of a lifeboat of stern frame construction where three lengths may be used.

    • (2) The scarph shall have a length of nine times the thickness of the keel and shall be strapped and riveted.

    • (3) A double-V butt weld may be used without straps.

    • 65 (1) Where increased thickness of bottom plating is called for by Table II, the thicker plating shall be fitted to approximately the turn of the bilge.

    • (2) Doubling plates of suitable size shall be fitted on all lifeboats where the shell is liable to damage, wear or corrosion from contact with chocks, and doublers shall be not less than the thickness of the bottom plating.

    • (3) All seam and butt laps shall be at least 32 mm.

    • (4) The laps of joints on keel, stem and sternpost shall be at least 50 mm.

    • (5) All seam and butt laps and laps of plating on keel, stem and sternpost shall be made over felt laid in wet red lead, but other methods will be given consideration.

    • 66 (1) Floors shall be fitted in lifeboats 7.3 m in length and over and

      • (a) shall be of a thickness not less than that of the bottom plating;

      • (b) shall be at least 150 mm deep at the centre line of the boat and flanged 38 mm top and bottom; and

      • (c) shall extend to approximately the turn of the bilge.

    • (2) The maximum floor spacing for boats 8.5 m in length and under shall be 915 mm and for boats over 8.5 m in length but not over 11 m in length shall be 762 mm.

    • (3) Limber holes shall be cut in floors and shall be so located as to provide efficient drainage.

    • (4) Limber holes shall be so arranged that the load on the floors is taken by the keel as well as by the shell plating.

    • 67 (1) Gunwales shall be in not more than two pieces.

    • (2) If gunwales are fitted in two lengths, the joints shall be placed at approximately one third of the length from the stem or stern of the boat and at opposite ends of the boat and may be riveted or welded and, if riveted, the backing-up piece shall be angular in section, of the thickness of the gunwale, and the length shall be not less than eight times the depth of the gunwale but a suitable butt weld may be used without backing-up bar.

    • (3) Flanged plates made from flat bars may be substituted for angle gunwales but the legs of the angles shall be approximately equal and the inside radius of the band shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm and the vertical leg shall be outside of the sheer strake.

    • (4) The outside of the gunwale angle shall have a nosing fitted to the gunwale of hollow steel, half round, 50 mm by 6 mm but if a flanged plate gunwale is used, a nosing will not be required.

    • (5) The gunwale brace shall be bent outboard at the thwart so that the bolts and nuts do not obstruct the seating space.

    • (6) Gunwales shall be secured to the thwarts by steel braces, bolts and rivets as set out in the following table:

      TABLE

      Length of Lifeboat

      (metres)

      Brace Size

      (millimetres)

      Bolts and Rivets

      (millimetres)

      6.7 and under blank line75 × 68 diameter
      6.7 and not over 8.5 blank line75 × 89.5 diameter
      Over 8.5 blank line75 × 9.511 diameter
    • (7) Gunwale braces shall be bolted to the thwarts with at least two carriage bolts of a size not less than that noted in subsection (6) and shall be riveted or welded to the gunwales.

    • (8) Where gunwale braces are riveted to the gunwale, at least two rivets of a size not less than that noted in subsection (6) shall be used.

    • (9) Bracket type gunwale braces will be given special consideration.

    • 68 (1) Breast plates shall be fitted to the stem and sternpost.

    • (2) The thickness of breast plates shall be not less than the thickness of the leg of the gunwale and the depth of the throat of the plate shall be not less than twice the depth of the gunwale.

  • 69 Thwarts, side benches, cleading, lower cross or side seats, stretchers, stanchions, bottom boards and rudder shall normally be of wood as specified for wooden lifeboats.

  • 70 A lifeboat, if fitted with an automatic plug, designed and installed to ensure complete drainage at all times when the boat is out of the water, shall be provided with a cap attached to the lifeboat by a suitable chain.

    • 71 (1) Steel or iron entering into the construction of lifeboats shall be galvanized by the hot dipped process but other methods of corrosion prevention will be given special consideration.

    • (2) Where welded construction is employed, the material shall be galvanized after welding unless it is impractical to do so in which case consideration will be given to equivalent protection.

Glass Reinforced Plastic Lifeboats (G.R.P.)

    • 72 (1) The relevant sections relating to wooden lifeboats apply to glass reinforced plastic lifeboats, except as modified in the following sections.

    • (2) In this Schedule, G.R.P means glass reinforced plastic.

  • 73 Boatbuilders who intend to build G.R.P. lifeboats, must satisfy the Board that the premises in which the lifeboats are to be built are suitable and that the employees have been properly trained for the type of work to be undertaken.

  • 74 G.R.P. lifeboats shall be made by the contact moulding method using polyester resins reinforced with glass fibre and shall comply with the requirements contained in this Schedule except that other materials, processes and techniques will receive consideration by the Board where full details are submitted and where it can be shown that such materials, processes and techniques have proved satisfactory in boat construction.

    • 75 (1) Any workshop used for moulding G.R.P. lifeboats shall be protected from the weather and shall be adequately ventilated and lighted.

    • (2) The temperature in a workshop shall be maintained between 15.5°C and 21°C and the humidity shall be kept at a low level and thermometers and a hygrometer shall be provided and placed in suitable positions.

    • (3) Draughts and direct sunlight shall be avoided and fluorescent or mercury lighting, if fitted, shall be kept well above the moulds.

  • 76 The instructions issued by the manufacturers with regard to the storage and use of materials shall be strictly adhered to.

Submission of Plans

    • 77 (1) Fully detailed plans and specifications for a prototype G.R.P. lifeboat shall be submitted to the Board for approval and shall include

      • (a) a diagrammatic section showing the proposed lay-up, with a single line representing each layer of reinforcement;

      • (b) a description of the method of fabrication;

      • (c) a longitudinal strength calculation showing the stresses that will arise in the gunwale and keel when the lifeboat is fully loaded and suspended by the lifting hooks and for the purpose of this calculation the bending moment shall be taken as WL/6

        where W is the weight of the fully laden lifeboat and L is the distance between the lifting hooks but where alternative positions are provided for the lifting hooks L is the maximum span and these stresses shall not normally exceed 7 722 kPa;

      • (d) the names of the manufacturers of the materials and, where applicable, the reference numbers of the materials;

      • (e) the resin formulations for the various parts of the lay-up and details of the additives, including catalyst and accelerator, shall be quoted in parts by weight to 100 parts of resin; and

      • (f) the resin/glass ratio.

    • (2) The resin formulation, resin to glass ratio, gel times, time allowable between successive laminating operations and time and temperature curing conditions shall comply with the resin manufacturer’s recommendations.

Materials

    • 78 (1) Resins and glass fibre reinforcements used in the construction of lifeboats shall be of types recommended by the manufacturers for boatbuilding and shall be approved by the Board.

    • (2) Resins shall be suitable for laminates that will be subjected to stress within a temperature range of from +65.5°C to -30°C and shall be formulated to have a gel time of less than one hour.

    • (3) Glass fibre reinforcements shall be of the low alkali “E” glass type containing not more than one per cent alkali, calculated as Na2O.

    • (4) Chopped strand mats shall be used for the main lay-up and these shall not exceed a nominal 610 g/m2 in weight.

    • (5) Woven cloths, rovings and tapes may be approved for parts of the lifeboat that are considered to be suitable for their application.

    • (6) Woven glass fibre reinforcements if used shall be in the desized state and finished so as to provide good resin to glass adhesion and laminated wet strength retention.

    • (7) Wood or metal inserts shall not be used unless full details of the proposed method for incorporating them in the boat structure are submitted to and approved by the Board.

    • (8) Any surface of the moulding that will be exposed to the atmosphere or to water shall be provided with a gel coat.

    • (9) Surfaces that may be walked upon shall provide a good non-slip foothold.

Specimen of Laminate

    • 79 (1) Before a process of laminating is approved, the boatbuilder shall prepare a sample laminate to be submitted for assessment of degree of cure to an authority approved by the Board.

    • (2) A sample laminate shall be flat, 300 mm square and made with 610 g/m2 (or equivalent) chopped strand mats and the chopped strand mats, the resin mix, the resin to glass ratio, gel coat and the curing conditions for the sample laminate shall be as proposed for the lifeboat.

Fire Retarding Agents and other Fillers

    • 80 (1) Mouldings for a G.R.P. lifeboat shall be made of self-extinguishing laminates.

    • (2) A specimen shall be cut from the sample referred to in section 79 and shall be tested in a draught free atmosphere as follows:

      • (a) three test specimens, each approximately 150 mm long by 13 mm wide shall be used; each specimen shall be marked by scribing a line 25 mm from one end; the other end shall be clamped in a support so that the longitudinal axis of the specimen is horizontal and the transverse axis inclined at 45° to the horizontal; a clean piece of 18 mesh wire gauze about 125 mm square shall be clamped under the specimen in a horizontal position 6 mm below the edge of the specimen, and with about 13 mm of the specimen extending beyond the edge of the gauze;

      • (b) a bunsen burner with a minimum outside diameter of 11 mm and a luminous flame 13 to 19 mm in height shall be placed under the free end of the specimen for 30 seconds, then the bunsen flame shall be removed and the specimen allowed to burn;

      • (c) if the flame on the specimen is extinguished before reaching the 25 mm mark, the bunsen burner shall be placed under the free end for a second period of 30 seconds immediately following the extinction of the first flame; and

      • (d) if the flame is again extinguished before reaching the 25 mm mark on each of the three test specimens, the laminate from which they were cut shall be regarded as self-extinguishing.

    • (3) The self-extinguishing property shall be imparted to the whole of the laminate, including the gel coat.

    • (4) An approved self-extinguishing resin shall be used, or, alternatively, fire retarding agents may be added by the boatbuilder to a non-self-extinguishing resin, which shall be of a type approved by the Board.

    • (5) Where fire retarding agents are added to a resin, the amounts used shall be limited so that the antimony trioxide and chlorinated paraffin wax do not exceed a combined total of 20 parts by weight to 100 parts of resin.

    • (6) Fillers other than fire retarding agents shall be limited so that the total quantity of fillers, excluding the fire retarding agents, does not exceed 10 parts by weight to 100 parts of resin.

    • (7) Fillers used shall be recommended by the resin manufacturers.

Bonded, Riveted, Bolted and Screwed Connections

    • 81 (1) Where half shell mouldings are used for a lifeboat, or internal glass reinforced plastic structures such as buoyancy units, bulkheads, floors, seats and thwarts are not laid-up integral with the shell, full details of the proposed methods for fixing and joining these items shall be submitted to the Board.

    • (2) The following means of connection are acceptable for use in G.R.P. work:

      • (a) surfaces to be bonded shall be roughened and thoroughly cleaned, the gel coats shall be removed in way of the surface, and the total thickness of fillet bonding strips shall be approximately equal to the thickness of the thinner of the parts being joined;

      • (b) rivets shall be cold-driven, the heads and points bearing on strips, plates or washers of appropriate material with precautions against bimetallic corrosion being taken, a suitable compound shall be used when a watertight joint is required, the rivets shall be dipped in resin or other suitable sealant to seal the exposed fibres in the holes and the minimum distance between the centre of the rivet hole and the edge of the G.R.P. material shall be three times the diameter of the hole;

      • (c) the requirements for bolted joints are the same as for riveted joints and bolts shall be made of a non-corrodible material other than copper or its alloys and the holes shall be of just sufficient diameter to take the bolts; and

      • (d) screwing is acceptable only for the connection of items of relatively minor importance where a better type of connection cannot be readily used and in such cases, bolts or screws of coarse thread shall be used.

Internal Buoyancy

    • 82 (1) Loose buoyancy tanks of a lifeboat shall be constructed and placed as described in sections 24 to 29 of this Schedule.

    • (2) Built-in buoyancy tanks that are not filled with an approved buoyancy material shall not exceed 915 mm in length and shall be tested to an air pressure of 10.3 kPa and means shall be provided for periodic inspection and testing.

    • (3) Buoyancy tanks for prototype G.R.P. lifeboats subjected to strength testing shall be tested to an air pressure of not less than 10.3 kPa both before and after the tests.

    • (4) Where it is proposed to fill the buoyancy tanks with materials, full details shall be submitted to the Board.

Painting

  • 83 Painting of a G.R.P. lifeboat shall be done only after the moulding is fully cured and a water resistant grade of pre-treatment primer or an epoxide based primer paint shall be used followed by any of the usual finishing coatings and silicone and wax release agents shall not be used for surfaces that are to be painted.

  • 84 A plug hole with a non-corrodible socket shall be provided at a suitable position to drain the lifeboat and the socket shall be designed to provide watertight protection to the edge of the hole.

Tests of the Completed Boat

    • 85 (1) A prototype G.R.P. lifeboat shall be tested as prescribed in section 21 and paragraph 22(b) of this Schedule, and shall be subjected to the additional tests prescribed in subsections (2) to (6).

    • (2) A 100 per cent overload test shall be made with the lifeboat suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and evenly distributed weights shall be loaded incrementally and measurements at full load, 25 per cent, 50 per cent, 75 per cent and 100 per cent overloads shall be recorded as follows:

      • (a) deflection of keel amidships,

      • (b) change in length as measured between the top of stem and stern post,

      • (c) change in breadth over the gunwale, and

      • (d) change in depth measured from gunwale to keel,

      and when the lifeboat is subject to 25 per cent overload, the keel deflection and change of breadth shall not exceed 1/400 part of the lifeboat’s length and the results at 100 per cent overload shall be approximately in proportion to those at 25 per cent overload.

    • (3) The lifeboat shall be loaded with evenly distributed weights equal to the weight of the equipment, food, water and persons to be carried and shall then be suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and dropped into the water from a height of 2.29 m, the height being measured from the keel to the water.

    • (4) The lifeboat shall be loaded as for the test prescribed in subsection (3) and then suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear with the falls 6.1 m in length and arranged so that the gunwale on one side of the boat is about 50 mm from a stationary wall or other structure of similar rigidity and the lifeboat shall then be moved outboard a distance of 2.44 m horizontal from its original position and shall be allowed to swing freely and strike the wall along one side.

    • (5) Before the tests prescribed in subsections (3) and (4) are carried out, and with the boat suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and loaded to its davit stowage condition, the keel shall be marked at each end in way of the lifting hooks and at amidships, and the length, breadth and depth of the boat measured and the measurements shall be checked after the tests and any permanent deflection recorded.

    • (6) If a motor or mechanically propelled lifeboat is to be strength tested and it is considered necessary to remove parts of the machinery to avoid damage to them, weights shall be added to compensate for the removal of the parts.

PART IV

Motor Lifeboats

  • 86 A motor lifeboat shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) it shall be fitted with a compression ignition engine;

    • (b) it shall be provided with sufficient fuel for 24-hour operation;

    • (c) it shall be capable of going astern; and

    • (d) it shall be capable of a speed, fully loaded in smooth water, of

      • (i) six knots in the case of passenger ships carrying more than 12 passengers, tankers, whale factories and fish processing ships, or

      • (ii) four knots in the case of other ships.

  • 87 A motor lifeboat engine shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) it shall be capable of starting readily and running reliably in cold weather;

    • (b) it shall operate properly under conditions of at least 10 degrees list and 10 degrees trim;

    • (c) its circulating water pumps shall be self-priming;

    • (d) it shall be adequately protected, together with its fuel tanks and accessories, from heavy weather;

    • (e) in a wooden lifeboat, there shall be a metal tray under the engine and fuel tank;

    • (f) its casing shall be of fireproof material;

    • (g) it shall be efficiently ventilated; and

    • (h) the fuel tank shall be capable of withstanding a 4.57 m head of water, shall have suitable filling and relief arrangements, and if made of steel, shall be galvanized externally.

  • 88 A lifeboat that is fitted with a fixed VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall

    • (a) be equipped with a cabin that is large enough to accommodate the apparatus and the person using it; and

    • (b) if the antenna of the apparatus is separately mounted, be provided with a device for installing and securing the antenna in its operating position.

  • 89 [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 41]

  • 90 The buoyancy appliances of a motor lifeboat shall be equal in volume to those of a non-motor lifeboat of equal size with an additional volume to compensate for the difference between

    • (a) the weight of the motor, its accessories, the radio apparatus and searchlight where fitted; and

    • (b) the weight of persons who could occupy the space occupied by the motor, its accessories, the radio apparatus and searchlight if this equipment were not fitted.

    The following is a worked example of the calculation for such cases:

    Wooden Motor Lifeboat, Class 1

    Dimensionsblank lineLblank lineBblank lineD

    of boatblank line= 8.5 × 2.62 × 1.17

    Persons

    Capacity by formula

    L × B × D × .6 blank line

    =15.63 m3=55

    Motor space

    1.37 × .76 × 1.17 = 1.22 m3

    Radio room

    1.1 × 1.19 × 1.17 = 1.53 m3

    } =2.75 m3
    Net capacity blank line12.88 m3
    Maximum number of persons allowable blank line=

    45

    Number of persons displaced blank line=

    10

    Minimum internal buoyancy required blank line

    blank line

    blank line1.56 m3

    Weight of motor and accessories (including  weight of fuel tanks but not fuel) blank line

    =

    610 kg

    Weight of radio and searchlight appliances and  accessories such as batteries, etc blank line

    =

    203 kg

    813 kg

    Buoyancy = 1025 kg/m3813 ÷ 1025  blank line

    =

    .793 m3

    Less buoyancy for 10 persons displaced at .0283  m3 each blank line

    =

    .283 m3

    .51

    blank line  .51 m3

    blank line

    blank line

    blank line2.07 m3

    Internal buoyancy required for 45 persons  subject to a seating test blank line

    =

    2.07 m3

    Internal buoyancy required for 32 persons being  the number determined by seating test blank line

    =

    1.72 m3

PART VMechanically Propelled Lifeboats

  • 91 A mechanically propelled lifeboat other than a motor lifeboat shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) the propelling gear shall, if manually operated, be readily operable by untrained persons;

    • (b) the propelling gear shall be operable with the lifeboat flooded;

    • (c) the propelling gear shall be readily available for service;

    • (d) the propelling gear shall not hinder the entry of persons into the lifeboat;

    • (e) sufficient power shall be available to enable the lifeboat to clear the ship’s side readily and to maintain course in a seaway, whether partially or fully loaded;

    • (f) means shall be provided to enable the helmsman to cause the lifeboat to go astern while the propelling gear is in operation; and

    • (g) the buoyancy appliances shall, where necessary, be increased to compensate for the weight of the propelling gear, in a manner similar to that prescribed for motor lifeboats.

PART VIDisengaging Gear

  • 92 Lifeboat disengaging gear shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) the gear shall be so arranged as to ensure simultaneous release of both ends of the lifeboat;

    • (b) the means of effecting release shall be placed aft;

    • (c) the gear shall be of a type that will permit the release of the lifeboat only when it is waterborne;

    • (d) the gear shall be of a type that will permit release if there is a towing strain on the link or falls;

    • (e) the hooks shall be suitable for instant unhooking by hand;

    • (f) the point of attachment of the hook to the eye, ring or link of the block shall not be lower than when ordinary fixed hooks are fitted;

    • (g) the gear and mechanism for effecting release shall be so constructed and arranged as to ensure the safety of the lifeboat independently of any safety pins;

    • (h) the means for effecting release shall be by hauling on or letting go a line or by using a lever and if release is effected by a pull upon a line, the line shall be properly cased in, rods or other connections between hooks shall also be cased in for the protection of persons from injury, the fair leads shall be properly arranged to prevent the lines from jamming or nipping and shall be strongly attached to permanent parts of the lifeboat, and the lines shall be fitted with chains where necessary for efficiency;

    • (i) such parts of the gear as would otherwise be likely to be set fast by rust or corrosion shall be made of non-corrodible metal;

    • (j) no part of the gear taking the weight of the lifeboat shall be made of cast metal; and

    • (k) the scantlings and proportions of all parts that support the weight of the lifeboat shall be designed to provide a breaking strength proportionate to a load of at least 2 1/2 times the weight of the heaviest loaded lifeboat in which the gear is intended to be fitted.

TABLE IStandard Scantlings (Finished Sizes) for Wood Lifeboats

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE II

Steel Lifeboats

Length of Boat Not overBar keel, Stem, and SternpostGunwalesShell PlatingThwartsStanchionsPainter Shackles Nominal SizeRudder Thickness
Angle barFlanged Flat BarSideBottomNumber RequiredDistance from top of thwart to top of gunwaleSize
metresmmmmmmUSSGUSSGNo.mmmmmmmmmm
3.764×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
4.364×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
4.964×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
5.564×1651×38×6102×61818422933×19133× 891625
6.164×1951×38×6102×61616522933×19133× 891625
6.764×1951×38×6102×61614522933×19133× 891932
7.376×1964×51×6114×61614525444×24144×1401932
7.976×1964×51×6114×61413625444×24144×1401932
8.589×1964×64×6127×61312625444×24144×1401932
9.189×1964×64×6127×61312727944×24144×1401932
9.8102×1964×64×6127×61312727944×29244×1401932
10.4102×1964×64×8127×81212827944×29244×1401932
11.0102×2564×64×8127×81212827944×29244×1401932
  • Hoisting shackles, if provided, shall have a factor of safety of six based on the lowering weight of the fully loaded lifeboat.

TABLE IIILifting Hooks for Lifeboats

Standard Sizes for Lifting Hooks of Round Section, and Keel Plates

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE IVDetails of Lifting Hooks

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE C.R.C., C. 1436, PP. 12376 TO 12379; SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VDetails of Keel Connection

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VIDetails of Keel Construction

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VIILifting Hooks for Boats 4.9 M and Under

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

  • SOR/78-216, s. 3
  • SOR/78-561, s. 2
  • SOR/80-685, ss. 30 to 63
  • SOR/81-430, s. 2
  • 1987, c. 7, s. 84(F). SOR/96-218, ss. 38 to 41
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 23
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 58

SCHEDULE V.1(Section 121)Lifeboat Standards for New Ships

  • 1 Every lifeboat shall meet

    • (a) the requirements of Regulations 41.1 to 41.7 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention, as amended from time to time; and

    • (b) the following requirements of Chapter III of the Safety Convention:

      • (i) in the case of a partially enclosed lifeboat, Regulations 42.2 to 42.4, and

      • (ii) in the case of a totally enclosed or free-fall lifeboat, Regulations 44.2 to 44.6.

    • 2 (1) Subject to subsections (2) and (3), every lifeboat shall be tested in accordance with section 6 of Part I of International Maritime Organization Resolution A.689(17), adopted on November 6, 1991 and entitled Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time.

    • (2) The lifeboat seating test described in section 6.8.1 of the Resolution referred to in subsection (1) shall be conducted with the test subjects wearing, instead of lifejackets, inherently buoyant

      • (a) marine anti-exposure work suits that meet the requirements of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.21-M89, published in June 1989 and entitled Marine Anti-exposure Work Suit Systems, as amended from time to time; or

      • (b) immersion suits that meet the requirements of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16-M89, published in February 1989 and entitled Marine Abandonment Immersion Suit Systems, as amended from time to time.

    • (3) The lifeboat cold engine starting test described in sections 6.11.2 to 6.11.4 of the Resolution referred to in subsection (1) shall also be carried out with the engine, and its fuel and coolant, in a chamber at a temperature of -30°C.

  • 3 Every lifeboat shall be marked, in clearly legible permanent characters,

    • (a) with its dimensions, complement, Board approval number, date of manufacture and the manufacturer’s name and serial number;

    • (b) on each side of the bow, in upper-case letters at least 100 mm in height, with the name and port of registry of the ship that carries the lifeboat; and

    • (c) with the call sign of the ship that carries the lifeboat and the number of the lifeboat, in such a way that both are clearly visible from above.

    • 4 (1) Every lifeboat carried on a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in Annex 2 of the Resolution referred to in paragraph (a).

    • (2) Every lifeboat carried on a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in the Resolution referred to in paragraph (1)(a); and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in the following Canadian General Standards Board Standards, as amended from time to time:

        • (i) in the case of material fitted on flexible surfaces, sections 4 and 5 of 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, and

        • (ii) in the case of material fitted on rigid surfaces, the provisions referred to in subparagraph (i) or sections 5 and 6 of 62-GP-11M, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective Enclosed Lens, Adhesive Backing, dated May 1978.

  • 5 A lifeboat that is fitted with a self-contained air support system shall be

    • (a) designed so that, for a period of not less than 10 minutes with all entrances and openings closed and the engine running normally,

      • (i) the air in the lifeboat remains safe and breathable, and

      • (ii) the atmospheric pressure inside the lifeboat never falls below the outside pressure nor exceeds it by more than 20 mbar; and

    • (b) provided with visual indicators that continuously indicate the pressure of the air supply within the air support system.

    • 6 (1) A lifeboat that is fire-protected shall be designed so that, when waterborne, it is capable of protecting the complement, when subjected to a continuous oil fire that envelops the lifeboat for a period of not less than eight minutes.

    • (2) Where a lifeboat referred to in subsection (1) is fitted with a water spray system, the system shall be designed so that

      • (a) water for the system is drawn from the sea by a self-priming motor pump;

      • (b) the flow of the water over the exterior of the lifeboat may be turned on and off;

      • (c) the sea-water intake prevents the intake of flammable liquids from the sea surface; and

      • (d) the system provides for flushing with fresh water and complete draining.

  • 7 A lifeboat that is fitted with a fixed VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall be equipped with a cabin that is large enough to accommodate the apparatus and the person using it.

  • SOR/96-218, s. 42
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 24
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 59

SCHEDULE VI(Paragraph 5.2(c) and section 132)Means of Embarkation into Survival Craft

    • 1 (1) Means of embarkation into survival craft shall be designed so that

      • (a) all lifeboats may be boarded and launched from the stowed position or an embarkation deck;

      • (b) davit-launched life rafts may be boarded and launched from

        • (i) a position immediately adjacent to the stowed position, or

        • (ii) where the life rafts are stowed in a location providing for easy side-to-side transfer at a single open-deck level, the location to which the life rafts are transferred prior to launching; and

      • (c) davit-launched survival craft may be brought against the side of the ship at the embarkation station and held alongside so that persons may safely embark.

    • (2) Means of embarkation into rescue boats shall be designed so that

      • (a) where the rescue boat is certified as a lifeboat and the other lifeboats carried by the ship are boarded by the complement and launched from an embarkation deck, the rescue boat may be boarded by its crew and launched, with the crew on board,

        • (i) from the embarkation deck, or

        • (ii) directly from the stowed position; and

      • (b) in any other case, the rescue boat may be boarded by its crew and launched, with the crew on board, directly from the stowed position.

    • 2 (1) On an existing ship, the means of embarkation into survival craft that have been launched shall

      • (a) be placed at each embarkation station; and

      • (b) consist of a Jacob’s ladder with hardwood steps that are

        • (i) at least 19 mm deep, 460 mm long and 100 mm wide,

        • (ii) equally spaced from the other steps by a distance of 355 mm, and

        • (iii) secured so that they remain horizontal.

    • (2) At each embarkation station for life rafts for which launching devices are not provided, the means of embarkation referred to in subsection (1) shall be sufficient in number having regard to the number of persons expected to be embarked at the station, and may be supplemented by knotted manila lifelines.

    • 3 (1) On a new ship that is a passenger ship, the means of embarkation into survival craft that have been launched shall be

      • (a) a slide or chute that is an integral part of a marine evacuation system; or

      • (b) if the embarkation deck is less than 4 m above the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition, an embarkation ladder that meets the requirements of this section.

    • (2) Means of embarkation shall be provided as follows:

      • (a) in the case of a slide or chute, at least one on each side of the ship; and

      • (b) in the case of an embarkation ladder, one at each embarkation station or at every two adjacent embarkation stations.

    • (3) Every step of an embarkation ladder shall be

      • (a) made of hardwood that is smoothly machined and free from knots or other irregularities, sharp edges or splinters, or made of another material with equivalent resistance, strength and durability;

      • (b) provided with a non-slip surface;

      • (c) at least 25 mm deep, not including the non-slip surface, and at least 480 mm long and 115 mm wide;

      • (d) equally spaced from the other steps at a distance of not less than 300 mm and not more than 380 mm; and

      • (e) secured so that it remains horizontal.

    • (4) Subject to subsection (5), the side ropes of an embarkation ladder shall consist of two uncovered manila ropes on each side that are

      • (a) not less than 65 mm in circumference; and

      • (b) continuous with no joints below the top step.

    • (5) A material other than manila rope may be used for the side ropes of an embarkation ladder if the dimensions, the breaking strength, and the weathering, stretching and gripping properties of the material are at least equivalent to those of manila rope.

    • (6) Side ropes that are made of manila rope or other natural fibre shall be replaced annually.

  • 4 Means of embarkation shall be

    • (a) kept ready for immediate use; and

    • (b) capable of extending from the embarkation deck to the waterline when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, under 10° of trim and listing 20°.

  • SOR/80-685, s. 64
  • SOR/81-430, s. 3
  • SOR/96-218, s. 42
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 60, 76(F)

SCHEDULE VII(Section 121)Rescue Boats and Emergency Boats

General Requirements for Rescue Boats

  • 1 Every rescue boat shall meet the requirements of Regulation 47.1 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention.

    • 2 (1) Subject to subsection (2), every rescue boat shall be tested in accordance with section 7 of Part 1 of International Maritime Organization Resolution A.689(17), adopted on November 6, 1991 and entitled Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time.

    • (2) The rescue boat seating test described in section 7.1.3 of the Resolution referred to in subsection (1) shall be conducted with the test subjects wearing, instead of lifejackets, inherently buoyant

      • (a) marine anti-exposure work suits that meet the requirements of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.21-M89, published in June 1989 and entitled Marine Anti-exposure Work Suit Systems, as amended from time to time; or

      • (b) immersion suits that meet the requirements of Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.16-M89, published in February 1989 and entitled Marine Abandonment Immersion Suit Systems, as amended from time to time.

  • 3 Rigid rescue boats shall be constructed of rubber, steel, aluminum, fibrous glass-reinforced plastics (GRP) or any other material that provides equivalent or superior physical properties and durability in a marine environment.

  • 4 Where a rudder is provided, it shall be permanently fitted to the rescue boat.

  • 5 Every rescue boat shall be marked, in clearly legible, permanent characters,

    • (a) on each side of the bow, in letters not less than 100 mm in height, with the name and port of registry of the ship that the rescue boat serves;

    • (b) with the call sign of the ship that the rescue boat serves and the number of the rescue boat, in such a way that both are clearly visible from above; and

    • (c) with the following information:

      • (i) its dimensions,

      • (ii) the manufacturer’s name, logo or trademark,

      • (iii) its serial number,

      • (iv) the month and year of manufacture,

      • (v) the complement, and

      • (vi) the Board approval number.

    • 6 (1) Every rescue boat carried on a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in Annex 2 of the Resolution referred to in paragraph (a).

    • (2) Every rescue boat carried on a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in the Resolution referred to in paragraph (1)(a); and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in the following Canadian General Standards Board Standards, as amended from time to time:

        • (i) in the case of material fitted on flexible surfaces, sections 4 and 5 of 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, and

        • (ii) in the case of material fitted on rigid surfaces, the provisions referred to in subparagraph (i) or sections 5 and 6 of 62-GP-11M, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective Enclosed Lens, Adhesive Backing, dated May 1978.

Additional Requirements for Inflated Rescue Boats

    • 7 (1) Every inflated rescue boat shall have a non-return valve fitted to each buoyancy compartment to allow the boat to be inflated by hand.

    • (2) The non-return valve of each buoyancy compartment shall

      • (a) enable the boat to be inflated by compressed air or gas, or both; and

      • (b) be so arranged or fitted as to prevent accidental deflation.

    • (3) Each buoyancy compartment shall be fitted with a pressure relief valve that

      • (a) is designed to allow gas or air to escape if the pressure exceeds a level that is safe for the compartment to carry; and

      • (b) reseats at a pressure that maintains the rigidity of the compartment.

    • (4) Gas that is used to inflate a rescue boat shall be non-flammable and non-toxic.

    • 8 (1) All cordage, webbing and thread used in the construction of an inflated rescue boat or in its fittings or equipment shall be inherently rot-proof.

    • (2) All cordage shall be attached to the inflated rescue boat so that, if the cordage is accidentally detached, the buoyancy compartments are not damaged.

General Requirements for Emergency Boats

    • 9 (1) Emergency boats shall be

      • (a) not less than 2.5 m and not more than 8.5 m in length;

      • (b) capable of carrying no fewer than four seated persons; and

      • (c) constructed of rubber, steel, aluminium, fibrous glass-reinforced plastics (GRP) or any other material that provides equivalent or superior physical properties and durability in a marine environment.

    • (2) Emergency boats may be either rigid or inflated.

  • 10 Arrangements for towing and marshalling life rafts shall be permanently fitted in every emergency boat and shall have a safety factor of at least 6:1.

    • 11 (1) Every emergency boat shall be of such form and proportions that it has positive stability in a seaway when loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) Every emergency boat shall be capable of maintaining positive stability when it is in an upright position in calm water, flooded and loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • 12 (1) An emergency boat shall provide seating that

      • (a) is thwarts, side benches or fixed chairs or is on the deck space;

      • (b) does not interfere with the positive stability of the emergency boat; and

      • (c) is capable of supporting the total mass of the number of persons for which it is designed, assuming each person to have a mass of 75 kg.

    • (2) An emergency boat may accommodate, at a maximum, the number of persons, all wearing lifejackets, that can be seated in the seating referred to in subsection (1) without interfering with the means of propulsion of the emergency boat or the operation of any of its equipment.

    • 13 (1) Every emergency boat shall be fitted with a drain that has a non-return valve.

    • (2) Each drain valve shall be

      • (a) provided with a cap or plug to close the drain valve; and

      • (b) readily accessible from inside the boat.

    • (3) The position of each drain valve shall be clearly indicated.

  • 14 Every emergency boat shall be provided with a means of bailing or be automatically self-bailing.

    • 15 (1) Every emergency boat shall be provided with a means of steering.

    • (2) Where a wheel or other remote steering mechanism is provided in an emergency boat, a tiller or other means of controlling the rudder or propeller direction in case of failure of the steering mechanism shall be provided.

    • (3) Where a rudder is provided, it shall be permanently fitted to the emergency boat.

  • 16 A buoyant lifeline shall be becketed to the gunwale around the outside of an emergency boat but not near the rudder or propeller.

    • 17 (1) An emergency boat shall be fitted with an approved inboard or outboard motor.

    • (2) An outboard motor that is gasoline-driven shall have a fuel system that is free of leaks.

    • (3) An inboard motor for an emergency boat shall not be gasoline-driven.

    • (4) A motor that is not gasoline-driven shall use fuel with a flashpoint that is above 43°C in a closed-cup test.

    • (5) Where starter batteries are used for motors, they shall be fitted in a watertight enclosure that is

      • (a) separate from the motor; and

      • (b) provided with a fitted top that has vents for necessary gas venting.

  • 18 An emergency boat shall be capable of

    • (a) proceeding ahead at a speed of at least six knots when loaded with its full complement and equipment and with all of its engine-powered auxiliary equipment in operation;

    • (b) manoeuvring at any speed of up to six knots;

    • (c) operating at its maximum speed for a period of at least four hours; and

    • (d) maintaining sufficient mobility and manoeuvrability in a seaway to enable

      • (i) persons to be retrieved from the water,

      • (ii) life rafts to be marshalled, and

      • (iii) the towing, at a speed of at least two knots, of the largest life raft or inflatable rescue platform carried on the ship when loaded with its full complement and equipment.

  • 19 Waterproof instructions, in English and French, for starting and operating the propulsion system of an emergency boat shall be provided and mounted in a conspicuous place near its motor starting controls.

    • 20 (1) Every emergency boat shall be marked, in clearly legible permanent characters, with

      • (a) its dimensions;

      • (b) the manufacturer’s name, logo or trademark;

      • (c) its serial number;

      • (d) the month and year of manufacture;

      • (e) the complement; and

      • (f) the Board approval number.

    • (2) Where permanent markings are made on an inflated emergency boat, the substance used for marking shall not contain ingredients harmful to the fabric of the boat.

    • 21 (1) Every emergency boat carried on a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in Annex 2 of the Resolution referred to in paragraph (a).

    • (2) Every emergency boat carried on a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in the Resolution referred to in paragraph (1)(a); and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in the following Canadian General Standards Board Standards, as amended from time to time:

        • (i) in the case of material fitted on flexible surfaces, sections 4 and 5 of 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, and

        • (ii) in the case of material fitted on rigid surfaces, the provisions referred to in subparagraph (i) or sections 5 and 6 of 62-GP-11M, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective Enclosed Lens, Adhesive Backing, dated May 1978.

Additional Requirements for Inflated Emergency Boats

  • 22 Every inflated emergency boat shall meet the requirements of sections 7 and 8.

  • 23 Every inflated emergency boat shall be

    • (a) strong enough to withstand a load that is twice the total mass of the boat when

      • (i) loaded with its full complement and equipment,

      • (ii) the ambient temperature is 18°C or more but not more than 22°C, and

      • (iii) all of the pressure relief valves of the boat are closed;

    • (b) provided with rubbing strips underneath the bottom of the boat and on vulnerable places on the outside of the buoyancy compartments;

    • (c) provided with becketed lifelines inside and outside the boat; and

    • (d) provided with towing patches for securing the painters forward and aft and the becketed lifelines.

  • 24 Every inflated emergency boat shall have positive freeboard around its entire periphery when subjected to a test when it is loaded in each of the following ways:

    • (a) with its full complement and equipment, the complement being in the normal seating positions;

    • (b) with its equipment and with the complement on one side of the main buoyancy chamber; and

    • (c) with its equipment and with one half of the complement on one side of the main buoyancy chamber and the other half at one end of the main buoyancy chamber.

  • 25 The transom fitted in an inflated emergency boat shall be inset by not more than 20 per cent of the overall length of the boat.

  • 26 A rigid flooring shall be fitted to an inflated emergency boat to provide a firm deck that protects the keel and any fabric that may form the bottom of the boat.

    • 27 (1) The main buoyancy chamber that forms the periphery of an inflated emergency boat shall

      • (a) be divided into no fewer than three airtight buoyancy compartments, the capacity of each not exceeding 40 per cent of the total chamber capacity; and

      • (b) provide a volume of not less than 0.17 m3 for each member of the complement.

    • (2) The buoyancy compartments of an inflated emergency boat shall be arranged so that, if any one is damaged, the intact compartments are able to support the complement in the normal seating positions with positive freeboard around the entire periphery of the boat.

    • (3) Where an inflated emergency boat is fitted with more than one main buoyancy chamber, the capacity of any one chamber shall not exceed 60 per cent of the total capacity of the chambers.

Additional Requirements for Rigid Rescue Boats and Rigid Emergency Boats

  • 28 The hull of a rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat shall be constructed with fire-retardant or non-combustible material.

    • 29 (1) Every rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat shall

      • (a) have inherent buoyancy or be fitted with inherently buoyant material that is sufficient to float the boat when it is in a seaway, flooded and fully loaded with its equipment; and

      • (b) in addition to meeting the requirements of paragraph (a), be fitted with inherently buoyant material that provides a buoyant force of 280 N for each member of the complement.

    • (2) The material referred to in subsection (1) shall be of a type that is not adversely affected by salt water or oil.

    • (3) Buoyant material shall not be fitted on the outside of the hull of a rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat unless it is in excess of the material required under subsection (1).

    • 30 (1) Every rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat shall be strong enough to withstand a load, without residual deflection on removal of the load, the mass of which is

      • (a) where the boat has a metal hull, 1.25 times the total mass of the boat when loaded with its full complement and equipment; and

      • (b) in any other case, twice the total mass of the boat when loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) Every rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat, when loaded with one half of its complement in the normal seating positions to one side of the centreline, shall have a freeboard, measured from the waterline to the lowest opening through which the boat may become flooded, of 1.5 per cent of its length or 100 mm, whichever is the greater.

  • 31 A rigid rescue boat or rigid emergency boat may be fitted with a foam-filled or inflated collar if the collar

    • (a) is subdivided into no fewer than three separate compartments, one on each side of the boat and one around the bow area;

    • (b) is fitted in such a way that the boat maintains positive stability when it is loaded with its full complement and equipment and one of the compartments of the collar is damaged;

    • (c) in the case of an inflated collar, meets the requirements of sections 7 and 8; and

    • (d) in the case of a foam-filled collar, is filled with foam that is non-granular and is not adversely affected by salt water or oil.

Installation of Davit-launched Rescue Boats and Emergency Boats

    • 32 (1) Every davit-launched rescue boat or emergency boat shall, when it is installed for the first time on a ship, be tested to ensure that it may be safely launched

      • (a) from the ship when the rescue boat or rigid emergency boat is loaded with a mass equal to 110 per cent of the total of its own mass and that of its full complement and equipment;

      • (b) from a height of not more than 1 m above the water when the rescue boat or emergency boat is in its light condition, is suspended from its release mechanism at that height and is then released; and

      • (c) from a height of not more than 1 m above the water when the rescue boat or emergency boat is loaded as described in paragraph (a), is suspended from its release mechanism at that height and is then released.

    • (2) For the purpose of the test referred to in subsection (1), each member of the complement is assumed to have a mass of 75 kg.

  • SOR/80-685 ss. 65 to 77
  • SOR/96-218, s. 42
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 61
  • SOR/2004-253, ss. 7(F), 8(F), 9(E)
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 15
  • 2014, c. 20, s. 366(E)

SCHEDULE VIII(Paragraph 5.2(b) and section 121)Life Rafts and Inflatable Rescue Platforms

General Requirements for Life Rafts

    • 1 (1) A life raft shall be constructed so as to be capable of withstanding exposure for 30 days afloat in any sea condition.

    • (2) Subject to subsection (3), a life raft shall be constructed so that when, packed in its container, it is dropped into the water from a height of 18 m, the life raft and its equipment are not damaged.

    • (3) A life raft that is to be stowed higher than 18 m above the waterline of a ship in its lightest seagoing condition shall be constructed so that it operates when it is drop-tested from the height of its stowed location.

    • (4) A life raft, when afloat, shall be capable of withstanding the number of jumps onto it equal to the number of members of its complement, from a height of at least 4.5 m above its floor.

    • (5) A life raft and its towing patch shall be so constructed as to enable the life raft to be towed at a speed of three knots in calm water when it is loaded with its full complement and equipment and one of its sea anchors is streamed.

    • 2 (1) To protect its occupants from exposure, a life raft shall have a canopy that is

      • (a) permanently erected; or

      • (b) automatically set in place when the life raft is launched and is floating.

    • (2) A life raft canopy shall

      • (a) provide insulation against heat and cold;

      • (b) be fitted with

        • (i) where the life raft is designed to accommodate nine or more persons, at least two entrances diametrically opposed, or

        • (ii) in any other case, at least one entrance;

      • (c) have every entrance clearly indicated and fitted with an adjustable closing arrangement that

        • (i) can be easily and quickly opened from the inside and outside, and

        • (ii) excludes water, wind and cold when it is closed;

      • (d) admit enough air for the occupants to breathe easily at all times, even with the entrances closed;

      • (e) be provided with at least one viewing port;

      • (f) be provided with a means for collecting rain water; and

      • (g) have enough headroom for seated occupants under all parts of the canopy.

  • 3 The total mass of a life raft, including its container and its heaviest equipment, shall be not more than 185 kg unless it is designed to be launched by a launching device.

    • 4 (1) Every life raft shall be

      • (a) provided with lifelines securely becketed around the inside and outside; and

      • (b) subject to subsection (2), fitted with a painter of a length at least equal to the greater of 15 m and twice the distance from the stowed location to the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition.

    • (2) Where the ship is engaged on a voyage in shallow waters and a 15-m painter would unreasonably lengthen the time needed to activate the inflation mechanism of the life raft should the ship sink, the painter length may be reduced to the length that would permit prompt activation.

    • 5 (1) Every life raft shall have fitted to the exterior top of its canopy a manually controlled lamp that

      • (a) is capable of continuous operation for a period of at least 12 hours in which it is visible at a distance of at least two nautical miles on a dark night in a clear atmosphere;

      • (b) if it is a flashing light, flashes at a rate of not less than 50 flashes per minute during its first two hours of operation;

      • (c) is powered by a sea-activated or a dry-chemical cell that does not deteriorate as a result of any dampness in the stowed life raft; and

      • (d) lights automatically when the canopy is set in place.

    • (2) Every life raft shall have fitted inside its canopy a manually controlled lamp that

      • (a) is capable of continuous operation for a period of at least 12 hours;

      • (b) lights automatically when the canopy is set in place; and

      • (c) is of sufficient intensity to enable the reading of survival and equipment instructions.

    • 6 (1) A life raft designed for use with a launching device shall, when loaded with its full complement and equipment, be capable of withstanding, without damage that affects its function,

      • (a) a lateral impact against the ship’s side at an impact velocity of not less than 3.5 m/s; and

      • (b) a drop into the water from a height of not less than 3 m.

    • (2) A release hook used with a davit-launched life raft shall

      • (a) meet the requirements set out in Regulation 41.7.6 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention; and

      • (b) be tested in accordance with Regulation 8.2 of Part 1 of International Maritime Organization Resolution A.689(17), adopted on November 6, 1991 and entitled Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time.

    • 7 (1) Every life raft shall have a painter system that

      • (a) provides a connection between the life raft and the ship it serves; and

      • (b) is arranged so that the life raft, when released, is not dragged under by the sinking ship.

    • (2) If a weak link is used in a float-free device, it shall

      • (a) be capable of withstanding the force required to pull the painter from the life raft container;

      • (b) be strong enough to permit the inflation of the life raft; and

      • (c) break under a strain of 2.2 ± 0.4 kN.

    • (3) A hydrostatic release unit that is used in a float-free device shall

      • (a) meet the requirements set out in Regulation 38.6.3 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention; and

      • (b) be tested in accordance with Regulation 11 of Part 1 of International Maritime Organization Resolution A.689(17), adopted on November 6, 1991 and entitled Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time.

    • 8 (1) Every life raft shall be marked with

      • (a) the manufacturer’s name, logo or trademark;

      • (b) its serial number;

      • (c) the month and year of manufacture;

      • (d) the Board approval number;

      • (e) over each entrance, in characters not less than 100 mm in height and in a colour that contrasts with that of the life raft, the complement of the life raft;

      • (f) in English and French, the location of the emergency equipment; and

      • (g) in the case of a rigid life raft, the name and port of registry of the ship it serves.

    • (2) The container of every life raft shall be marked with

      • (a) the name, logo or trademark of the manufacturer of the life raft;

      • (b) the serial number of the life raft;

      • (c) the month and year of manufacture of the life raft;

      • (d) the Board approval number;

      • (e) in characters of not less than 100 mm in height, the complement of the life raft;

      • (f) the date and place the life raft was last serviced;

      • (g) the length of the painter;

      • (h) in English and French, the type of emergency pack enclosed;

      • (i) the maximum permitted height of stowage above the waterline;

      • (j) in English and French, launching instructions;

      • (k) the words “LIFE RAFT” and “RADEAU DE SAUVETAGE”;

      • (l) where a Class II EPIRB is stowed in the life raft, the words “EPIRB INSIDE” and “RLS À L’INTÉRIEUR”; and

      • (m) where the life raft is approved as meeting the requirements of Regulation 38 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention, the word “SOLAS”.

    • 9 (1) Every life raft carried on a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in Annex 2 of the Resolution referred to in paragraph (a).

    • (2) Every life raft carried on a ship that is not a Safety Convention ship shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in the Resolutionreferred to in paragraph (1)(a); and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in the following Canadian General Standards Board Standards, as amended from time to time:

        • (i) in the case of material fitted on flexible surfaces, sections 4 and 5 of 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, and

        • (ii) in the case of material fitted on rigid surfaces, the provisions referred to in subparagraph (i) or sections 5 and 6 of 62-GP-11M, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective Enclosed Lens, Adhesive Backing, dated May 1978.

Additional Requirements for Inflatable Life Rafts

    • 10 (1) Every inflatable life raft shall be constructed with a main buoyancy chamber that is divided into not less than two separate compartments, each inflated through a non-return inflation valve.

    • (2) The buoyancy chamber of a life raft shall be designed so that, in the event of any one of the compartments being damaged or failing to inflate, the intact compartments are capable of supporting, with positive freeboard over the entire periphery of the life raft, the complement of the life raft.

    • (3) For the purpose of calculating the support capacity of a life raft pursuant to subsection (2), each member of the complement is assumed to have a mass of 75 kg and to be seated in the normal seating position wearing an immersion suit.

  • 11 The floor of an inflatable life raft shall be capable of being insulated against cold by

    • (a) one or more compartments that

      • (i) the occupants can inflate, or

      • (ii) inflate automatically and can be deflated and re-inflated by the occupants; or

    • (b) other means not dependent on inflation.

    • 12 (1) An inflatable life raft shall

      • (a) inflate with non-toxic gas

        • (i) within one minute after the activation of the inflation mechanism at an ambient temperature of 18°C or more, and

        • (ii) within three minutes after the activation of the inflation mechanism at a core temperature of -30°C; and

      • (b) once inflated, maintain its form when loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) Each buoyancy compartment of an inflatable life raft shall be

      • (a) capable of withstanding a pressure equal to at least three times the working pressure; and

      • (b) prevented from reaching a pressure exceeding twice the working pressure by means of pressure relief valves or a limited gas supply.

    • 13 (1) Every inflatable life raft shall have a semi-rigid boarding ramp that is

      • (a) fitted to at least one entrance to enable persons to board the life raft from the sea; and

      • (b) where the ramp is inflatable, arranged so that the life raft does not deflate if the ramp is damaged.

    • (2) The boarding ramp for a davit-launched inflatable life raft that has more than one entrance shall be fitted at the entrance opposite the bowsing lines and embarkation facilities.

    • (3) Each entrance that is not provided with a boarding ramp shall have a boarding ladder, the lowest step of which shall be not less than 0.4 m below the light waterline of the life raft.

    • (4) Every inflatable life raft fitted with a boarding ladder shall have a means inside to assist persons to pull themselves into the life raft from the boarding ladder.

    • 14 (1) Every inflatable life raft shall be constructed so that it is stable in a seaway when fully inflated and floating with the canopy uppermost.

    • (2) Every inflatable life raft, other than a self-righting life raft, shall be capable of being readily righted by one person when it is in the inverted position.

    • 15 (1) Every inflatable life raft that has the complement set out in column I of an item of the table to this subsection shall be fitted on the underside with the number of water pockets set out in column II of that item.

      TABLE

      Column IColumn II
      ItemComplement of Life RaftWater Pockets
      1Fewer than 95
      29 or more but not more than 167
      317 or more but not more than 2511
      4More than 2515
    • (2) Water pockets shall be of a highly visible colour and distributed evenly around the circumference of the life raft at each side of the gas bottles, with sufficient separation between them to allow air to escape readily.

    • (3) The cross-sectional area of a water pocket shall form the shape of an isosceles triangle, the base of the triangle being the part that is attached to the life raft.

    • 16 (1) The aggregate capacity of the water pockets of a life raft shall be

      • (a) where the complement of the life raft is fewer than nine persons, not less than 225 L; and

      • (b) where the complement of the life raft is nine or more persons, not less than the greater of

        • (i) 225 L, and

        • (ii) (18 × N) L, where N equals the number of persons in the complement.

    • (2) Water pockets shall be designed in such a way that the pockets fill to at least 60 per cent of their capacity within 25 seconds after the deployment of the life raft.

    • 17 (1) Every inflatable life raft shall be packed in a container that is

      • (a) constructed so as to withstand wear under the conditions that are likely to be encountered at sea; and

      • (b) of sufficient inherent buoyancy, when packed with the life raft and its equipment, to pull the painter from within and to operate the inflation mechanism if the ship sinks.

    • (2) Every inflatable life raft container shall, insofar as it is practicable, be watertight except for drain holes in the container bottom.

    • (3) Every inflatable life raft shall be packed in its container in such a way as to ensure, insofar as it is possible, that the waterborne life raft inflates in an upright position on breaking free from the container.

    • 18 (1) Every inflatable life raft that is designed for use with a launching device shall, when suspended from its lifting hook or bridle, be capable of withstanding a load of

      • (a) 4.0 times the mass of its full complement and equipment at an ambient temperature and a stabilized life raft temperature of 20° ± 3°C with all of the pressure relief valves inoperative; and

      • (b) 1.1 times the mass of its full complement and equipment at an ambient temperature and a stabilized life raft temperature of -30°C with all of the pressure relief valves operative.

    • (2) For the purpose of the calculation pursuant to subsection (1), each member of the complement is assumed to have a mass of 75 kg.

  • 19 A rigid container for a life raft that is designed to be launched by a launching device shall be secured so as to prevent the container or parts of the container from falling into the sea during and after inflation and launching.

Additional Requirements for Rigid Life Rafts

    • 20 (1) Buoyancy for rigid life rafts shall be provided by inherently buoyant material placed as near as possible to the periphery of the life raft.

    • (2) Buoyant material used in the construction of a rigid life raft shall be fire-retardant or protected by a fire-retardant covering.

  • 21 The floor of a rigid life raft shall prevent water from entering the life raft, support the occupants out of the water and insulate them from the cold of the water.

  • 22 A rigid life raft shall be

    • (a) self-righting;

    • (b) capable of being readily righted by one person when it is in the inverted position; or

    • (c) capable of operating fully and safely with either side uppermost.

    • 23 (1) Every rigid life raft that is designed for use with a launching device shall, when suspended from its lifting hook or bridle, be capable of withstanding a load of four times the mass of its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) For the purpose of the calculation pursuant to subsection (1), each member of the complement is assumed to have a mass of 75 kg.

    • 24 (1) Every rigid life raft shall have a rigid boarding ramp that is fitted to at least one entrance to enable persons to board the life raft from the sea.

    • (2) The boarding ramp for a davit-launched rigid life raft that has more than one entrance shall be fitted to the entrance opposite the bowsing lines and embarkation facilities.

    • (3) Each entrance that is not provided with a boarding ramp shall have a boarding ladder, the lowest step of which shall be not less than 0.4 m below the light waterline of the life raft.

    • (4) Every rigid life raft that is fitted with a boarding ladder shall have a means inside to assist persons to pull themselves into the life raft from the boarding ladder.

Requirements for Inflatable Rescue Platforms

    • 25 (1) An inflatable rescue platform shall be constructed so as to be capable of withstanding exposure for 30 days afloat in any sea condition.

    • (2) Subject to subsection (3), an inflatable rescue platform shall be constructed so that when, packed in its container, it is dropped into the water from a height of 18 m, the inflatable rescue platform and its equipment are not damaged.

    • (3) An inflatable rescue platform that is stowed higher than 18 m above the waterline of a ship in its lightest seagoing condition shall be constructed so that it inflates when it is drop-tested from the height of its stowed location.

    • (4) An inflatable rescue platform, when afloat, shall be capable of withstanding the number of jumps onto it equal to the number of members in its complement, from a height of at least 4.5 m above its floor.

    • (5) An inflatable rescue platform and its towing patch shall be so constructed as to enable it to be towed at a speed of at least two knots in calm water when it is loaded with its full complement and equipment and one of its sea anchors is streamed.

    • 26 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform shall be constructed with a main buoyancy chamber that is divided into not less than two separate compartments, each inflated through a non-return inflation valve.

    • (2) The buoyancy chamber of an inflatable rescue platform shall be designed so that, in the event of any one of the compartments being damaged or failing to inflate, the intact compartments are capable of supporting, with positive freeboard around the entire periphery of the platform, the complement of the platform.

    • (3) For the purpose of calculating the support capacity of an inflatable rescue platform pursuant to subsection (2), each member of the complement is assumed to have a mass of 75 kg and to be seated in the normal seating position wearing a lifejacket.

    • 27 (1) An inflatable rescue platform shall

      • (a) inflate with non-toxic gas within three minutes after the activation of the inflation mechanism at a core temperature of 0°C; and

      • (b) once inflated, maintain its form when loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) Each compartment of an inflatable rescue platform shall be

      • (a) capable of withstanding a pressure equal to at least three times the working pressure; and

      • (b) prevented from reaching a pressure exceeding twice the working pressure, by means of pressure relief valves or a limited gas supply.

    • 28 (1) An inflatable rescue platform shall be

      • (a) provided with lifelines securely becketed around the inside and outside; and

      • (b) subject to subsection (2), fitted with a painter of a length equal to at least the greater of 15 m and twice the distance from the stowed location to the waterline of the ship in its lightest seagoing condition.

    • (2) Where the ship is engaged on a voyage in shallow waters and a 15-m painter would unreasonably lengthen the time needed to activate the inflation mechanism of the inflatable rescue platform should the ship sink, the painter length may be reduced to the length that would permit prompt activation.

    • 29 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform shall have a painter system that

      • (a) provides a connection between the platform and the ship it serves; and

      • (b) is arranged so that the platform, when released, is not dragged under by the sinking ship.

    • (2) If a weak link is used in a float-free device, it shall

      • (a) be capable of withstanding the force required to pull the painter from the inflatable rescue platform container;

      • (b) be strong enough to permit the inflation of the inflatable rescue platform; and

      • (c) break under a strain of 2.2 ± 0.4 kN.

    • (3) A hydrostatic release unit that is used in a float-free device shall

      • (a) meet the requirements set out in Regulation 38.6.3 of Chapter III of the Safety Convention; and

      • (b) be tested in accordance with Regulation 11 of Part 1 of International Maritime Organization Resolution A.689(17), adopted on November 6, 1991 and entitled Testing of Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time.

  • 30 Every inflatable rescue platform shall be capable of performing its intended function with either side uppermost.

    • 31 (1) Where an inflatable rescue platform is fitted with water pockets, the pockets shall be fitted on the topside and the underside.

    • (2) Where the floor of an inflatable rescue platform includes one or more drains, each drain shall be fitted with a non-return valve.

    • 32 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

      • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

      • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in:

        • (i) in the case of a Safety Convention ship, Annex 2 of the Resolution referred to in paragraph (a),

        • (ii) in any other case, sections 4 and 5 of Canadian General Standards Board Standard 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, as amended from time to time.

    • (2) Where the buoyancy compartments of an inflatable rescue platform are not of a colour such as reddish-orange or yellow, panels of other high-visibility colours shall be secured to the compartments so that at least 1 m2 of each panel is visible from above the platform.

  • 33 The equipment required to be carried on an inflatable rescue platform shall be accessible with either side of the platform uppermost.

  • 34 An inflatable rescue platform shall be fitted with a portable automatically activated lamp that

    • (a) is capable of continuous operation for a period of at least 12 hours during which it is visible at a distance of at least two nautical miles on a dark night in a clear atmosphere;

    • (b) if it is a flashing light, flashes at a rate of not less than 50 flashes per minute during its first two hours of operation; and

    • (c) is powered by a sea-activated or a dry-chemical cell that does not deteriorate as a result of any dampness in the stowed platform.

    • 35 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform that is capable of accommodating 38 persons or fewer shall be fitted with at least one semi-rigid boarding ramp and one boarding ladder to enable persons to board the platform from the sea.

    • (2) Every inflatable rescue platform that is capable of accommodating more than 38 persons shall have two diametrically opposed, semi-rigid boarding ramps and two boarding ladders to enable persons to board the platform from the sea.

    • (3) An inflatable rescue platform shall be designed so that the platform will not deflate if a boarding ramp is damaged.

    • (4) The boarding ramps and ladders shall be capable of being used with either side of the inflatable rescue platform uppermost.

    • (5) The lowest step of a boarding ladder shall be not less than 0.4 m below the light waterline of the inflatable rescue platform.

    • (6) Every inflatable rescue platform that is fitted with a boarding ladder shall have a means inside to assist persons to pull themselves onto the platform from the boarding ladder.

    • 36 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform shall be packed in a container that is

      • (a) constructed so as to withstand wear under the conditions that are likely to be encountered at sea; and

      • (b) of sufficient inherent buoyancy, when packed with the platform and its equipment, to pull the painter from within and to operate the inflation mechanism if the ship sinks.

    • (2) Every container of an inflatable rescue platform shall, insofar as it is practicable, be watertight except for drain holes in the container bottom.

    • 37 (1) Every inflatable rescue platform shall be marked with

      • (a) the manufacturer’s name, logo or trademark;

      • (b) its serial number;

      • (c) the month and year of manufacture;

      • (d) the Board approval number;

      • (e) in characters not less than 100 mm in height and in a colour that contrasts with that of the platform, the complement of the platform; and

      • (f) in English and French, the location of the emergency equipment.

    • (2) The container of every inflatable rescue platform shall be marked with

      • (a) the name, logo or trademark of the manufacturer of the platform;

      • (b) the serial number of the platform;

      • (c) the month and year of manufacture of the platform;

      • (d) the Board approval number;

      • (e) in characters of not less than 100 mm in height, the complement of the platform;

      • (f) the date and place the platform was last serviced;

      • (g) the length of the painter;

      • (h) in English and French, the type of emergency pack enclosed;

      • (i) in English and French, the maximum permitted height of stowage above the waterline;

      • (j) in English and French, launching instructions; and

      • (k) the words “INFLATABLE RESCUE PLATFORM” and “PLATE-FORME DE SAUVETAGE GONFLABLE”.

  • SOR/80-685 s. 78
  • SOR/96-218, s. 42
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 62
  • SOR/2004-253, ss. 10(F), 11(F)
  • 2014, c. 20, s. 366(E)

SCHEDULE IX(Subparagraph 20(1)(c)(iv) and section 129)Launching Devices and Recovery Arrangements

PART IRequirements for Existing Ships

General

  • 1 For the purposes of this Schedule, in relation to a lifeboat or life raft,

    turning-out condition

    turning-out condition means a lifeboat or life raft that is fully equipped but manned only by its launching crew; (état de mise à l’eau sans passagers)

    working load

    working load and loaded condition mean the sum of the weight of the lifeboat or life raft, equipment, blocks and falls, and the number of persons with which the lifeboat or life raft is required to be lowered, each person being considered to weigh 75 kg. (charge pratiqueoucharge complète)

    • 2 (1) Lifeboat davits shall be either

      • (a) gravity type for a lifeboat weighing more than 2.29 t, or

      • (b) luffing or gravity type for a lifeboat weighing not more than 2.29 t in its turning out condition,

      but radial davits may be accepted in ships not over 45.7 m in length carrying not more than 12 passengers.

    • (2) Lifeboats weighing more than 2.29 t in loaded condition shall be served by steel wire rope falls together with winches, but alternative arrangements may be accepted in existing ships, and emergency boats shall be rapidly recoverable.

    • (3) Where mechanically powered appliances are fitted for the recovery of emergency boats, efficient hand gear shall also be provided.

  • 3 At least two lifelines, each long enough to reach the water under all conditions of draught with the ship listed 15 degrees either way, shall be attached to each davit span.

Luffing Davits

  • 4 Luffing type davits shall be such that the lifeboat in turning-out condition can be turned out against a 15 degree list, and shall have adequate fore and aft stability.

Gravity Davits

    • 5 (1) Where gravity type davits comprising arms mounted on rollers that engage with and travel down fixed inclined trackways are employed, the trackways shall be inclined at an angle of not less than 30 degrees to the horizontal when the vessel is upright.

    • (2) Gravity davits of types other than that referred to in subsection (1) shall be so designed that there is a positive turning out moment during the whole of the davit travel from the inboard to the outboard position when the vessel is listed up to 25 degrees either way.

    • (3) Where gravity type davits are fitted with electric motors for recovering the lifeboats, automatic cut-outs shall be fitted and arranged to operate before the davits come against the runway stops in order to avoid overstressing the wire rope falls or davits and limit switches shall be fitted as follows:

      • (a) on fixed motors, being motors built into the winch, limit switches shall be fitted for each davit arm but one only need be fitted if a compensating gear is incorporated in the arrangement of falls so that the loading in one fall cannot exceed that in the other as the arms reach the stowed position, and

      • (b) on semi-portable motors, being motors that can be readily moved from one winch to another but that are bolted in position when operating, and on fully portable motors, being motors that are held in position manually when operating, one only need be fitted if it is fitted at least 460 mm down the trackway from the stowed position, and preferably on the trackway farthest away from the winch operator,

      and in every case the push button control for the motor shall return automatically to the “off” position as soon as the pressure is released.

Radial Davits

    • 6 (1) Radial davits shall be fitted with means of preventing the davit heels from leaving their sockets.

    • (2) Radial davits shall be fitted with guys adequate to prevent fore and aft movement of the davits in the outboard position, with the lifeboat in loaded condition.

Stresses

    • 7 (1) The designed stress on the davit arms, when operating under maximum load and conditions of list, shall afford an adequate factor of safety having regard to the quality of the material used, the method of construction, and the live nature of the load to which the davits are subjected.

    • (2) Every davit or launching device shall be clearly marked with its safe working load.

Static Load Test

  • 8 In the case of all davits made of cast steel or of wrought steel or other material fabricated by a welding process, each davit at full outreach shall be capable of withstanding a static load test of not less than 2.2 times that part of the working load supported by each arm.

Attachments at the Davit Head

  • 9 The attachments at the davit head from which the blocks are suspended shall be capable of withstanding a proof load test of not less than 2 1/2 times the working load.

Blocks

    • 10 (1) Lifeboat blocks shall be of ample strength having regard to the working load upon the davits.

    • (2) Metal blocks shall be

      • (a) of ductile quality and adequate strength, and

      • (b) capable of withstanding a proof load test of not less than 2 1/2 times the working load on the davits,

      and no part of gear intended to bear the weight of a lifeboat shall be constructed of cast metal without the consent of the Board.

    • (3) Lower fall blocks shall be fitted with a ring or long link for attachment to the lifting hooks, unless the fitting of disengaging gear is adopted in lieu of standard lifting hooks.

    • (4) Wood blocks and rope falls, where permitted, shall comply with the requirements set out in the following table:

      TABLE

      Length of Boat (metres)Ships other than non-self-propelled ships and ships making Home-Trade IV or Minor Waters II voyagesNon-self-propelled ships and ships making Home-Trade IV or Minor Waters II voyages
      Block (mm)PurchaseCircumference of falls (mm)Block (mm)PurchaseCircumference of falls (mm)
      Not over 9.1330Triple and Triple95305Triple and Triple90
      Not over 8.5330Triple and Triple95305Triple and Triple83
      Not over 8.2305Triple and Triple90280Triple and Triple75
      Not over 7.9305Triple and Triple90280Triple and Triple75
      Not over 7.6305Triple and Triple83280Triple and Triple75
      Not over 7.3280Triple and Triple75254Triple and Triple70
      Not over 7.0280Triple and Double75254Triple and Triple65
      Not over 6.7254Triple and Double70230Double and Double65
      Not over 6.4254Triple and Double65230Double and Double65
      Not over 6.1230Double and Double65203Double and Double65
      Not over 5.5230Double and Double65203Double and Single65
      Not over 4.9203Double and Double65203Double and Single65

Wire Ropes

    • 11 (1) The breaking tensile load of steel wire rope falls shall be not less than six times the working load.

    • (2) Wire rope falls shall be securely attached to the drum of the winch and the end attachments of the wires and other parts from which the lifeboat is to be suspended shall be capable of withstanding a proof load of not less than 2 1/2 times the working load.

    • (3) Where wire splices are used, they shall be capable of withstanding a proof test of not less than 2 1/2 times the working load unless sample splices of each size of wire when tested to destruction, give a factor of safety at the splice of not less than five.

Winches

    • 12 (1) Winch drums shall be arranged to keep the two falls separate and to enable them to be payed out at the same rate; leads of the wire ropes shall be such that they will wind evenly on the drums and the lead blocks shall be arranged at least 2.13 m from the winch drums.

    • (2) The brakes of the lifeboat winches shall be of robust construction and shall afford complete control and limitation of speed in the operation of lowering.

    • (3) The hand brake of a lifeboat winch shall be so arranged that it is normally in the “ON” position and returns to the “ON” position when the control handle is not being operated and the weight on the brake lever shall be sufficient to operate the brake effectively without additional pressure.

    • (4) The brake gear on lifeboat winches shall include means of automatically controlling the speed of lowering to ensure that the boat is lowered expeditiously without exceeding a rate of lowering consistent with safety and for this purpose the automatic brake shall be set to provide a speed of lowering of the lifeboat of between 18 and 36 m per minute.

    • (5) Ratchet gear shall be incorporated in the hand brake mechanism of lifeboat winches.

    • (6) Where practicable, the brake gear on a lifeboat winch shall be so situated as to enable the man operating the winch to observe the lifeboat during the whole process of launching into the water.

Lowering Tests

    • 13 (1) Where lifeboats and life rafts must be capable of being lowered fully loaded, each pair of davits and each launching device, including winches and brakes where fitted, shall be capable of safely lowering the lifeboat or life raft loaded with the required equipment and a distributed weight equal to the number of persons for which it measures plus 10 per cent of the total load, including blocks and falls.

    • (2) Winch brakes exposed to the weather shall be capable of withstanding the test prescribed in subsection (1) with the braking surface wet.

  • 14 Where lifeboat falls other than steel wire rope are employed, they shall be durable, unkinkable, firmly laid, and pliable, and shall be able to pass freely through a hole 10 mm larger than the nominal diameter of the fall.

  • 15 Life raft launching devices shall be

    • (a) capable of holding or lowering under control a fully loaded life raft;

    • (b) fitted with a release hook capable of being cocked at the launching station so that the life raft disengages immediately it is water borne;

    • (c) capable of rapid recovery of the fall; and

    • (d) placed in equal numbers on each side of the ship.

    • 16 (1) Where means of launching other than davits are employed, they shall be of adequate strength.

    • (2) An inspector shall witness a test and record the time taken in putting a boat out on either side of the ship by hand, and he shall satisfy himself as to the efficiency of the whole arrangement and the number of men employed in putting a boat out shall be not greater than the crew of the ship.

  • 17 Where a lifeboat or boat must be capable of being launched, equipment for launching need not be provided if an inspector is satisfied that the lifeboat or boat can readily be man-handled into the water by the crew, without damage.

Bollards

    • 18 (1) Suitable bollards as shown in the following sketches or other equally effective appliances for lowering lifeboats shall be provided in all cases where cordage rope falls are used.

    • (2) For lifeboats not exceeding 6.1 m in length, horn cleats attached to the davits may be fitted in lieu of bollards.

    • (3) For lifeboats over 6.1 m but not exceeding 7.6 m in length, a double bollard may be fixed to each davit and for lifeboats over 7.6 m in length, bollards of the cruciform type shall be attached to the deck, and in the case of lifeboats not over 8.2 m in length the horizontal arms shall be not less than 127 mm in diameter, and shall be sufficiently long to take at least four turns of the largest rope with which they will be used.

    • (4) In the case of lifeboats over 8.2 m in length the horizontal arms of the bollard shall be 150 mm in diameter, and not less than 150 mm in length from the side of the column and ample lips or flanges shall be provided at ends of the arms to prevent the fall from jumping off and fair leads shall be fitted and be arranged to ensure that the lifeboat is not lifted during the process of swinging out.

      DAVIT BOLLARDS, CRUCIFORM TYPE

      GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/2001-179, S. 63

      DAVIT BOLLARDS

      GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/2001-179, S. 63

      DAVIT BOLLARDS, DECK TYPE

      GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/2001-179, S. 63

PART IIRequirements for New Ships

General Requirements for Survival Craft

  • 1 In this Part, Pollution Convention means the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973, signed at London on November 2, 1973, and the Protocol of 1978 relating thereto, signed at London on February 17, 1978, and any amendments, whenever made, to Protocol I, the Annexes or the Appendices to that Convention.

  • 2 No material or component used in the construction or repair of launching devices shall

    • (a) deteriorate from the effects of weathering on board ship under conditions of normal stowage;

    • (b) deteriorate from contact with salt water; or

    • (c) be of cast metal.

    • 3 (1) A launching device shall be arranged so that the fully equipped survival craft it serves may be safely lowered against a trim of 10° and a list of 20°, both with the survival craft’s full complement and without it, by means of

      • (a) gravity; or

      • (b) stored mechanical power that is independent of the ship’s power supply.

    • (2) Notwithstanding the requirements of subsection (1), launching devices for the survival craft of an oil tanker, a chemical tanker or a liquefied gas tanker that has a final angle of heel greater than 20°, determined in accordance with Regulation 25(3)(c) of Annex I of the Pollution Convention, shall be capable of operating at the final angle of heel on the lower side of the ship.

    • (3) Recovery arrangements for a lifeboat or rescue boat shall be arranged so that the fully equipped lifeboat or rescue boat may be safely hoisted against a trim of 10° and a list of 20°, both with the full complement of the lifeboat or rescue boat and without it.

  • 4 Every launching device shall be clearly marked with the safe working load for which it is designed.

  • 5 Every launching mechanism for a launching device shall be arranged so that it may be activated by one person from a position on the ship’s deck and by one person from a position in any of the survival craft that it serves.

  • 6 A launching device shall be constructed so that

    • (a) all parts requiring maintenance by the ship’s crew are readily accessible; and

    • (b) it is easily maintained.

    • 7 (1) The winch brakes of a launching device shall be capable of withstanding

      • (a) a static test with a proof load of not less than 1.5 times the maximum working load for which the device is designed; and

      • (b) a dynamic test at the maximum lowering speed with a proof load of not less than 1.1 times the maximum working load for which the device is designed.

    • (2) A launching device and its attachments, other than winch brakes, shall be capable of withstanding a static proof load of not less than 2.2 times the maximum working load for which the device is designed.

  • 8 A launching device and its attachments and fittings shall be designed with a minimum factor of safety of

    • (a) 4.5 applied to all davit and winch structural members; and

    • (b) 6 applied to all falls, suspension chains, links, blocks, padeyes, fastenings and all other fittings used in connection with the equipment.

    • 9 (1) Falls shall be made of wire rope that is resistant to rotation and corrosion.

    • (2) Falls shall be long enough for survival craft to reach the water when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, is under 10° of trim and is listing 20°.

    • (3) Falls shall, in the case of a multiple-drum winch, be arranged so as to

      • (a) wind off each drum at the same rate when lowering; and

      • (b) wind on each drum evenly at the same rate when hoisting.

    • (4) Davit arms and falls that are recovered by power shall be fitted with safety devices that automatically cut off the power supply

      • (a) before the davit arms reach the stops, unless the power source is designed to prevent over-stressing; and

      • (b) when the power switch is released.

    • 10 (1) Every launching device shall be fitted with a hand gear for hoisting survival craft.

    • (2) Means shall be provided to prevent hand gear handles and wheels from rotating when survival craft are being lowered or hoisted by power.

    • 11 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the lowering speed of survival craft shall be at least the speed determined by the formula

      S = 0.4 + (0.02 × H)

      where

      S
      is the speed of lowering in metres per second, and
      H
      is the height in metres from the davit head to the waterline with the ship in its lightest seagoing condition.
    • (2) At no time shall the maximum lowering speed of a survival craft exceed 1.3 m/s.

    • 12 (1) A launching device shall be fitted with brakes capable of stopping the descent of, and securely holding, a survival craft loaded with its full complement and equipment.

    • (2) Launching device brake pads shall be protected from oil and from contact with salt water.

    • (3) A launching device that is fitted with manual brakes shall be designed so that the brake is always applied unless the operator, or a mechanism activated by the operator, holds the brake control in the “OFF” position.

  • 13 Where a survival craft requires a launching device and is designed to float free, the float-free release of the survival craft from its stowed location shall be automatic.

    • 14 (1) A lifeboat free-fall launching device shall be

      • (a) arranged so that excessive forces are not experienced by the occupants of the lifeboat during launching;

      • (b) constructed as a rigid structure that causes the lifeboat to launch clear of, and be propelled away from, the ship;

      • (c) protected against corrosion; and

      • (d) where it uses an inclined plane, constructed so as to prevent incandescent friction or impact sparking during the launching of the lifeboat.

    • (2) Where a lifeboat uses a free-fall launching device, the lifeboat shall be capable of being launched and hoisted by a launching device using falls.

Additional Requirements for Life Rafts

    • 15 (1) The launching device of a davit-launched life raft shall be provided with

      • (a) a hand gear for the recovery of the falls only; and

      • (b) an automatic release hook that

        • (i) prevents the premature release of the life raft during lowering, and

        • (ii) releases the life raft once it is waterborne.

    • (2) The launching device of a davit-launched life raft shall not use gravity as a means of turning out the device.

    • (3) A free-fall launching device for a life raft shall be capable of

      • (a) launching the life raft when the ship is in a seaway, is under 10° of trim and is listing 20°;

      • (b) being activated by one person; and

      • (c) launching one life raft at a time.

Additional Requirements for Lifeboats

    • 16 (1) The launching device of a lifeboat shall be capable of hoisting the lifeboat with its crew and shall be designed to be activated by one person.

    • (2) The activation of the launching device shall be possible

      • (a) in the case of a free-fall launching device, from a position in the lifeboat; and

      • (b) in any other case, from a position on the ship’s deck and from a position in the lifeboat.

    • (2.1) The recovery arrangements of a lifeboat shall be designed to be activated by one person, and the activation shall be possible from a position on the ship’s deck and from a position in the lifeboat.

    • (3) The launching device and recovery arrangements of a lifeboat that are designed to be activated from a position on the ship’s deck shall be designed in such a way that the operator can see the lifeboat at all times during launching and hoisting.

    • (4) Where the launching device of a lifeboat, other than a totally enclosed lifeboat, employs more than one davit arm, it shall be fitted with a davit span that is provided with not less than two lifelines of such a length as to reach the water when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition, is under 10° of trim and is listing 20°.

Additional Requirements for Rescue Boats

    • 17 (1) The launching device of a rescue boat shall

      • (a) be fitted with a power winch motor capable of hoisting the rescue boat loaded with its full complement and equipment at a rate of not less than 0.3 m/s;

      • (b) incorporate an on/off load release hook; and

      • (c) be designed to be activated by one person.

    • (2) The activation of the launching device shall be possible

      • (a) in the case of a free-fall launching device, from a position in the rescue boat; and

      • (b) in any other case, from a position on the ship’s deck and from a position in the rescue boat.

    • (2.1) The recovery arrangements of a rescue boat shall be designed to be activated by one person, and the activation shall be possible from a position on the ship’s deck and from a position in the rescue boat.

    • (3) The launching device and recovery arrangements of a rescue boat that are designed to be operated from a position on the ship’s deck shall be designed in such a way that the operator can see the rescue boat at all times during launching and hoisting.

Additional Requirements for Emergency Boats

    • 18 (1) A launching device used to lower and hoist an emergency boat

      • (a) may be manually powered;

      • (b) shall be operated from a position on the ship’s deck that has a clear range of visibility to the water at the side of the ship; and

      • (c) shall be capable of lowering and hoisting an emergency boat that is loaded with its equipment and a launching crew of at least two persons.

    • (2) Where the launching device of an emergency boat is strong enough to lower only the boat and its launching crew, the device shall be conspicuously marked with the words “LOWER WITH LAUNCHING CREW ONLY” and “N’ABAISSER QU’AVEC L’ÉQUIPAGE DE MISE À L’EAU”.

  • 19 An emergency boat is not required to be provided with a launching device if it can be readily lowered by the launching crew into the water without damage.

  • SOR/80-685, ss. 79 to 85
  • SOR/96-218, ss. 43, 44(E), 45
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 63 to 65
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 12(F)
  • SOR/2006-256, ss. 16(F), 17(F)
  • SOR/2013-235, ss. 9, 10
  • SOR/2015-161, ss. 1, 2

SCHEDULE X

[Repealed, SOR/2001-179, s. 66]

SCHEDULE XI

[Repealed, SOR/2002-122, s. 9]

SCHEDULE XII(Section 121)Line-Throwing Appliances

  • 1 A line-throwing appliance shall be capable of throwing a line a distance of at least 230 m in calm weather in such a manner that the lateral deflection does not exceed 10 per cent of the length of flight.

  • 2 A line-throwing appliance shall be marked with

    • (a) brief instructions in English and French; or

    • (b) diagrams illustrating its use.

  • 3 A line-throwing appliance shall consist of

    • (a) a firing device with at least four projectiles and four lines; or

    • (b) four units that have integral projectiles and lines.

  • 4 Each line of every line-throwing appliance shall have a breaking strength of not less than 2 kN.

  • 5 The rocket, in the case of a pistol-fired rocket, or the assembly, in the case of an integral rocket and line-throwing appliance, shall be contained in a weathertight casing.

  • 6 A line-throwing appliance shall be stowed in a container that is weathertight.

  • 7 Every projectile, cartridge or other means of ignition of a line-throwing appliance shall be withdrawn from service at the latest four years after its date of manufacture.

    • 8 (1) Every projectile, cartridge or other means of ignition of a line-throwing appliance shall be marked with

      • (a) the manufacturer’s name, logo or trademark;

      • (b) the lot number;

      • (c) the month and year of manufacture; and

      • (d) the Board approval number.

    • (2) A line-throwing appliance that is an integral unit shall be marked with the month and year of manufacture of the projectile and means of ignition.

  • SOR/79-546, s. 2
  • SOR/96-218, s. 49
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 68
  • 2014, c. 20, s. 366(E)

SCHEDULE XIII(Section 121)Thermal Protective Aids

  • 1 The thermal conductivity of the material from which a thermal protective aid is constructed shall be not more than 0.25 W/(m·K).

  • 2 Every thermal protective aid shall be designed

    • (a) to withstand air temperatures from -30°C to +65°C without damage;

    • (b) to enable a person to put on the aid correctly within one minute after reading the instructions;

    • (c) to permit the wearer to remove it in the water within two minutes if it impairs the wearer’s ability to swim;

    • (d) to remain functional after 24 hours of contact with diesel oil; and

    • (e) to maintain its watertight integrity when supporting a column of water 2 m in height.

    • 3 (1) Every thermal protective aid shall be supplied with instructions, in English and French, and diagrams explaining how to put on and use the aid.

    • (2) The instructions for a thermal protective aid shall

      • (a) not exceed 50 words;

      • (b) indicate clearly whether the protective aid can be worn while the wearer is swimming; and

      • (c) be printed

        • (i) on the exterior of its storage case,

        • (ii) on a waterproof card attached to the aid or its storage case, or

        • (iii) on the aid, if its storage case is transparent and the instructions are visible through the storage case.

    • (3) The instructions and diagrams for a thermal protective aid shall be available in a format that can be inserted in the ship’s training manual.

  • SOR/80-685, ss. 91, 92
  • SOR/96-218, s. 49
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 69

SCHEDULE XIV(Subsection 131(1))Lifebuoys and Lifebuoy Equipment

    • 1 (1) Lifebuoys and lifebuoy equipment that are carried on the following classes of ships shall meet the requirements of this section and sections 3 and 4:

      • (a) Class I ships;

      • (b) Class II ships that are Safety Convention ships; and

      • (c) Class IX ships.

    • (2) At least one lifebuoy that has a buoyant lifeline attached to it shall be carried on each side of the ship.

    • (3) A lifebuoy that has a buoyant lifeline attached to it shall not have a self-igniting light or a self-activating smoke signal attached to it.

    • (4) At least one lifebuoy that has a self-igniting light and a self-activating smoke signal attached to it shall be

      • (a) located on each wing of the navigating bridge of the ship; and

      • (b) arranged so that it may be released clear of the side of the ship by a quick-release device.

    • (5) The remainder of the self-igniting lights and self-activating smoke signals shall be attached to lifebuoys and equally distributed, insofar as it is practicable, on both sides of the ship.

    • (6) Any remaining lifebuoys shall be equally distributed, insofar as it is practicable, on both sides of the ship, with at least one in the vicinity of the stern.

    • 2 (1) Lifebuoys and lifebuoy equipment that are carried on the following classes of ships shall meet the requirements of this section and sections 3 and 4:

      • (a) Class II ships that are not Safety Convention ships;

      • (b) Class III ships;

      • (c) Class IV ships;

      • (d) Class V ships;

      • (e) Class VII ships;

      • (f) Class X ships; and

      • (g) Class XI ships.

    • (2) Buoyant lifelines shall be attached to lifebuoys that are equally distributed, insofar as it is practicable, on each side of the ship.

    • (3) A lifebuoy that has a buoyant lifeline attached to it shall not have a self-igniting light or a self-activating smoke signal attached to it.

    • (4) At least one lifebuoy that has a mass of not less than 4 kg and not more than 6 kg shall

      • (a) have attached to it

        • (i) a self-igniting light and a self-activating smoke signal, or

        • (ii) if the ship is engaged on a home-trade voyage, Class IV, an inland voyage or a minor waters voyage, a self-igniting light that is visible by day and night;

      • (b) where the ship is 25 m or over in length, be located, insofar as it is practicable, on each wing of the navigating bridge of the ship; and

      • (c) be arranged so that it may be released clear of the side of the ship by a quick-release device.

    • (5) The remainder of the self-igniting lights and self-activating smoke signals shall be attached to lifebuoys and equally distributed, insofar as it is practicable, on both sides of the ship.

    • (6) Any remaining lifebuoys shall be equally distributed, insofar as it is practicable, on both sides of the ship, with at least one in the vicinity of the stern.

  • 3 A lifebuoy

    • (a) shall not be permanently secured in any way; and

    • (b) shall be stowed so that it is readily available for immediate deployment.

  • 4 Buoyant lifelines that are attached to lifebuoys shall

    • (a) be non-kinking;

    • (b) have a length that is at least the greater of

      • (i) 30 m, and

      • (ii) twice the height that the lifebuoy is stowed above the waterline of the ship when the ship is in its lightest seagoing condition;

    • (c) have a diameter of not less than 8 mm;

    • (d) have a breaking strength of not less than 5 kN; and

    • (e) be capable of floating for a period of at least six hours.

  • SOR/80-685, ss. 93, 94
  • SOR/89-528, s. 2
  • SOR/96-218, s. 49
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 70

SCHEDULE XV(Section 121)Suitable Boats and Approved Boats on Existing Ships

General

  • 1 Every boat shall be constructed in accordance with drawings submitted to and approved by the Board.

  • 1.1 Every suitable boat and every approved boat shall have a capacity of not less than 1.416 m3.

  • 2 Every suitable boat and every approved boat shall

    • (a) be capable of maintaining positive stability when open to the sea and loaded with its full complement of persons and equipment;

    • (b) be provided with lifting hooks or other suitable means of enabling the boat to be raised or lowered;

    • (c) be capable of being propelled by oars or paddles; and

    • (d) be provided with means for the stowage and securing of the equipment prescribed by these Regulations for the boat.

  • 3 [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 53]

  • 4 Every suitable boat and every approved boat shall be provided with retro-reflective material that

    • (a) is fitted in the manner set out in section 1 of Annex 1 to International Maritime Organization Resolution A.658(16), adopted on October 19, 1989 and entitled Use and Fitting of Retro-Reflective Materials on Life-Saving Appliances, as amended from time to time; and

    • (b) meets the technical specifications set out in the following Canadian General Standards Board Standards, as amended from time to time:

      • (i) in the case of material fitted on flexible surfaces, sections 4 and 5 of 62-GP-12, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective, Enclosed Lens, Flexible Type, dated January 1975, and

      • (ii) in the case of material fitted on rigid surfaces, the provisions referred to in subparagraph (i) or sections 5 and 6 of 62-GP-11M, Standard for: Marking Material, Retroreflective Enclosed Lens, Adhesive Backing, dated May 1978.

Rigid Boats

  • 5 Every rigid suitable boat and every rigid approved boat shall be constructed of wood, aluminium, steel or fibrous glass-reinforced plastic.

  • 6 Every rigid boat shall be

    • (a) capable of supporting without deformation, while suspended by its lifting hooks, a weight equal to the aggregate of

      • (i) the product obtained by multiplying the maximum number of persons that the boat can carry, as determined in accordance with section 17 of this schedule, by 75 kg, and

      • (ii) 10 per cent of the product referred to in subparagraph (i); and

    • (b) as inherently buoyant as a Class 2 wooden lifeboat.

  • 7 The buoyancy medium of every rigid boat shall be resistant to deterioration or loss of effectiveness from contact with petroleum products and suitably protected from wear and tear.

  • 8 The ratio of length to breadth to depth of every rigid boat shall be approximately 7 : 2.5 : 1.

  • 9 The girth amidships of every rigid boat, measured from gunwale to gunwale under the keel, shall be approximately the sum of the breadth and 1.5 times the depth.

Inflatable Boats

  • 10 [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 54]

  • 10.1 Every inflatable boat shall be carried on board ship in a fully inflated operational condition and ready for use in case of an emergency.

  • 11 Every inflatable boat shall be provided with suitable lifting connections so that it may be lowered and raised in inflated condition with full equipment.

  • 12 Every inflatable boat shall be so constructed that the buoyancy chambers contain in the aggregate not less than four compartments, which compartments shall

    • (a) be as nearly as practicable of equal volume;

    • (b) comprise in the aggregate not less than 80 per cent of the inflated buoyancy space of the boat;

    • (c) be evenly distributed port and starboard; and

    • (d) be so constructed that deflation of any one compartment will not cause deflation of any other compartment.

    • 13 (1) In this section, CGSB means the Canadian General Standards Board and A.S.T.M means the American Society for Testing and Materials.

    • (2) The materials used in the construction of the buoyancy chambers of an inflatable boat shall

      • (a) have a breaking strength of not less than 2 000 N, tested in accordance with CGSB Specification No. 4-GP-2 Method 9.1 for the one inch strip method;

      • (b) be resistant to weathering so that after 30 cycles in an Atlas twin-arc Weatherometer the tensile strength of the material does not decrease by more than 10 per cent;

      • (c) be resistant to petroleum products so that after 24 hours immersion in solvent, Reference Fuel A, A.S.T.M. D-471, the tensile strength of the material does not decrease by more than five per cent; and

      • (d) be abrasion resistant to the extent that at least 5 000 revolutions of a Taber abraser, using No. H22 wheel and 10 N loading, are required to completely wear through a sample.

    • 14 (1) The breaking strength of the material incorporating a seam in the buoyancy chambers of an inflatable approved boat shall be not less than 90 per cent of the breaking strength of the material.

    • (2) The breaking strength of the material incorporating a seam referred to in subsection (1) shall be tested by pulling the material at right angles to the seam.

  • 15 All repairs on inflatable boats shall be made in accordance with the manufacturer’s repair manual using only materials recommended by the manufacturer.

Inspection

  • 16 Every boat shall, to determine whether it meets the requirements of this Schedule, be inspected by an inspector, as follows:

    • (a) the boats shall be swung out and lowered into the water at every inspection;

    • (b) boats shall be inspected after all movable equipment has been removed;

    • (c) all boat equipment shall be inspected, checked and properly re-stowed;

    • (d) rigid boats shall be inspected for signs of deterioration and where internal buoyancy is fitted it shall be inspected in the same manner as the internal buoyancy required to be fitted in lifeboats; and

    • (e) inflatable boats shall be inspected for signs of deterioration and wear and the inspector may require deflation of one or more buoyancy chambers in order to check the gas-tight integrity of chamber separations.

Determination of Capacity

  • 17 An inspector shall determine the maximum number of persons that a boat can carry in the following manner:

    • (a) in the case of a rigid boat, the number shall be equal to the lesser of

      • (i) the product of the length, breadth and depth of the boat multiplied by 1.766, and

      • (ii) by using a seating test, the maximum number of persons that can sit in the boat; or

    • (b) in the case of an inflatable boat, the number of persons for each of whom the boat provides

      • (i) 0.37 m2 of floor space, and

      • (ii) 0.17 m3 of buoyancy space in the buoyancy chambers of the boat.

Marking

  • 18 A steamship inspector who has determined the capacity of a boat and, following an inspection of the boat, that it meets the requirements of this Schedule shall cause the boat to be permanently marked with the following symbol and information:

    • (a) the symbol “$”;

    • (b) the maximum number of persons to be carried;

    • (c) the date of inspection of the boat; and

    • (d) his initials.

  • SOR/78-561, s. 5
  • SOR/78-815, ss. 1 to 3
  • SOR/80-685, ss. 104 to 107
  • SOR/81-430, s. 5
  • SOR/96-218, ss. 50 to 57
  • SOR/2001-179, ss. 71 to 75
  • SOR/2004-253, s. 13
  • SOR/2006-256, s. 18(E)

SCHEDULES XVI and XVII

[Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 49]
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