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Life Saving Equipment Regulations (C.R.C., c. 1436)

Regulations are current to 2019-11-19 and last amended on 2019-06-17. Previous Versions

SCHEDULE V(Section 121)Lifeboat Standards for Existing Ships

PART IGeneral Requirements

    • 1 (1) Lifeboats of Class 1 shall be open boats constructed with rigid sides and fitted with internal buoyancy appliances only, in accordance with Part III of this Schedule.

    • (2) Lifeboats of Class 2 shall be open boats constructed in accordance with the requirements for a Class 1 lifeboat, but not fitted with internal buoyancy appliances, except in the case of lifeboats constructed of non-buoyant material, as described in Part III of this Schedule.

    • (3) Except where otherwise specified, a lifeboat shall be not less than 4.9 m in length.

    • (4) To facilitate aerial observation, all upper surfaces of a lifeboat shall be a highly visible shade of orange or yellow.

    • (5) Notwithstanding subsections (1) and (2), a lifeboat with a rigid shelter may be approved if the lifeboat can be readily opened from both inside and outside, and the shelter does not impede rapid embarkation and disembarkation or the launching and handling of the lifeboat.

    • (6) A motor lifeboat that is fitted with means for preventing the entry of water at the fore end may be approved.

    • 2 (1) [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 40]

    • (2) Every lifeboat shall have affixed to it retro-reflective tape that is

      • (a) manufactured in accordance with

        • (i) CGSB Specification

          • (A) No. 62-GP-11 for the type prescribed therein with the highest level of reflectivity, or

          • (B) No. 62-GP-12

          for all rigid surfaces, and

        • (ii) CGSB Specification No. 62-GP-12 for all flexible surfaces; and

      • (b) arranged as shown in the following diagrams.

        GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE C.R.C., C. 1436, PP. 12351 AND 12352

    • (3) The retro-reflective tape referred to in subsection (2) shall be in sections

      • (a) not less than 50 mm in width;

      • (b) not less than 300 mm in length;

      • (c) so spaced that the distance between the centres of adjacent sections is not more than 500 mm; and

      • (d) fitted

        • (i) on top of the gunwale as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection,

        • (ii) on the outside of the lifeboat as near the gunwale as possible, as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection, and

        • (iii) on the top of the canopy or exposure cover, in the form of crosses as shown in the diagrams set out in that subsection.

    • (4) The canopy or exposure cover shall not obscure the retro-reflective tape sections on the side of the lifeboat.

    • 3 (1) Lifeboats shall be properly constructed for the purpose for which they are intended and shall be of such form and proportions as to have ample stability in a seaway, and sufficient freeboard when loaded with their full complement of persons and equipment.

    • (2) All lifeboats shall be capable of maintaining positive stability when open to the sea and loaded with their full complement of persons and equipment.

    • 4 (1) The weight of a lifeboat when fully laden with persons and equipment shall not exceed 20.32 t.

    • (2) A person shall be deemed to weigh 75 kg for the purposes of this schedule and two children under the age of 12 years shall be equated to one person.

    • 5 (1) Notwithstanding Part IV of the Schedule a lifeboat approved for the accommodation of more than 60 persons but not more than 100 persons may, in lieu of complying with that Part, comply with Part V of this Schedule.

    • (2) No lifeboat shall accommodate more than 150 persons.

  • 6 For the purpose of determining the number of persons that a lifeboat can accommodate, each person shall be assumed to be an adult and to be wearing a lifejacket.

    • 7 (1) When an Inspector has satisfied himself that the construction of a new lifeboat is in accordance with the approved plan and is in all respects, satisfactory, he shall cause the following details to be marked on the stem or sheer-strake thereof in permanent characters, clearly visible and as nearly as practicable 75 mm in height:

      • (a) length, breadth and depth, in metres and tenths;

      • (b) the number of persons the lifeboat is approved to carry;

      • (c) the date of final inspection; and

      • (d) his initials.

    • (2) In the case of an existing unmarked lifeboat, or other equipment that has been accepted by the Board as a lifeboat, the inspector concerned shall, if satisfied that all conditions stipulated by the Board have been met, mark such lifeboat or equipment in accordance with paragraphs (1)(a), (b) and (d).

    • (3) Every lifeboat shall be marked,

      • (a) on each bow, with the name of the ship and port of registry to which it belongs; and

      • (b) where the ship has a muster list, with a number corresponding to the appropriate lifeboat number shown on the muster list.

  • 8 The Board will consider for approval lifeboats made of aluminum, glass reinforced plastic, moulded plywood or other suitable material.

  • 9 No lifeboat shall be deemed fit to carry more than 60 persons unless it is a motor lifeboat or a mechanically propelled lifeboat.

  • 10 Lifeboats built outside Canada may be accepted as equipment complying with these Regulations if they are

    • (a) approved by the British Board of Trade and British Board of Trade certificates are provided therefor;

    • (b) built in the United States under special arrangement with the United States Coast Guard; or

    • (c) built in accordance with plans approved by the Board and certificated by the Government authority of the country in which they are built.

  • 11 Repairs to lifeboats shall comply with the construction requirements or be of equivalent standard.

PART IICarrying Capacity

  • 12 The cubic capacity of a lifeboat shall be measured in cubic metres and, subject to section 15, may be determined by Stirling’s (Simpson’s) Rule, where

    Cubic Capacity = L/12 (4A + 2B + 4C)

    where L denotes the length of the lifeboat in metres from the inside of the planking or plating at the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post or to the inside of the transom where the lifeboat has a square stern, and where A, B and C denote respectively the area of the cross-sections at the quarter-length forward, amidships and the quarter-length aft, that correspond to the 3 points obtained by dividing L into 4 equal parts (the areas corresponding to the ends of the boat being considered negligible), and the areas A, B and C shall be deemed to be given in square metres by the successive application of the following formula to each of the 3 cross-sections:

    Area = h/12 (a + 4b + 2c + 4d + e)

    where h denotes the depth measured in metres inside the planking or plating, from the keel to the level of the gunwale or a greater depth, as determined in sections 13 and 14, and a, b, c, d and e denote the horizontal breadths of the lifeboat measured in metres inside the planking or plating at the upper and lower points of the depth and at the 3 points obtained by dividing h into 4 equal parts (a and e being the breadths at the extreme points, and c at the middle point of h), the capacity of a square sterned lifeboat being calculated as if the lifeboat had a pointed stern.

  • 13 If the sheer of the gunwale, measured at the two points situated at a quarter of the length of the lifeboat from the ends, exceeds one per cent of the length, the depth used in calculating the area of cross-sections A and C in section 12 shall be deemed to be the depth amidships plus one per cent of the length of the lifeboat.

  • 14 If the depth of the lifeboat amidships exceeds 45 per cent of the breadth, the depth used in calculating the area of the midship cross-section B shall be deemed to be equal to 45 per cent of the breadth, and the depth used in calculating the areas of the quarter-length sections A and C is obtained by increasing the last figure by an amount equal to one per cent of the length of the lifeboat, but in no case shall the depths used in the calculation exceed the actual depths at these points.

  • 15 Unless the owner of a lifeboat requires the cubic capacity of the lifeboat to be determined in accordance with section 12, the cubic capacity may be assumed to be that determined by using the formula

    • (a) L x B x D x 0.6; or

    • (b) in the case of lifeboats other than planked wooden lifeboats, L x B x D x 0.64;

    where L is the length measured from the intersection of the outside of the planking with the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post, or to the after side of the transom, and B is the greatest breadth at the outside of the planking and D is the depth amidships inside the planking from the keel to the level of the gunwale but in any case does not exceed 45 per cent of the breadth.

  • 16 The following table shows the dimensions and cubic capacity of standard lifeboats where the cubic capacity of a lifeboat is determined by using one of the formulae specified in section 15 of this Schedule:

    TABLE

    LengthBreadthDepthCubic
    (metres)(metres)(metres)(metres)
    9.12.741.1417.055
    8.82.671.1015.507
    8.52.591.0714.134
    8.22.511.0412.843
    7.92.440.9911.450
    7.62.360.9610.331
    7.32.290.919.127
    7.02.290.888.464
    6.72.210.847.463
    6.42.130.826.707
    6.12.060.795.956
    5.81.980.765.237
    5.51.910.734.601
    5.21.830.724.111
    4.91.750.703.602
  • 17 The following table shows the dimensions and cubic capacity of lifeboats other than standard lifeboats:

    TABLE

    LengthBreadthDepthCubic
    (metres)(metres)(metres)(metres)
    4.61.680.673.107
    4.61.680.612.828
    4.31.600.592.436
    4.01.520.562.043
    3.71.450.551.770
    3.71.310.491.425
    3.41.370.521.453
    • 18 (1) Subject to subsection (2), the number of persons that may be carried in a lifeboat shall be determined by dividing the cubic capacity by the following units:

      TABLE

      Length of Lifeboat

      (metres)

      Unit for Ships making Home-Trade IV or Minor Waters II VoyagesUnit for Ships making Voyages other than Home-Trade IV and Minor Waters II
      7.3 or more blank line.2832.2832
      6.7 blank line.2832.3115
      6.1 blank line.2832.3398
      5.5 blank line.2832.3681
      4.9 and under blank line.3398.3964
    • (2) Where the depth of a lifeboat exceeds 1.22 m, the number of persons permitted in accordance with this section shall be reduced in the proportion of 1.22 m to the actual depth unless the lifeboat can successfully pass the flotation tests prescribed by Part III of this schedule.

  • 19 The number of persons that may be carried in a dory shall be determined in accordance with the following table:

    TABLE

    Length of DoryNumber of Passengers, if any, in ship
    (metres)More than 1212 or less
    3.7 blank line23
    4.3 blank line34
    4.6 blank line34
    4.9 blank line45
    5.2 blank line45
    5.5 blank line66
    5.8 blank line66
  • 20 The number of persons that may be carried in a motor lifeboat shall be determined in the manner provided in section 18 of this Part and in Part IV of this Schedule.

PART III

Construction and Tests

  • 21 Lifeboats shall be inspected during construction by an inspector and air cases, where fitted, shall be tested by submersion or other means suitable for detecting leaks.

  • 22 The prototype of a lifeboat, other than a glass reinforced plastic lifeboat, shall be subjected to the following tests:

    • (a) it shall be suspended by the lifting hooks or releasing gear, the length, breadth and depth measured, and evenly distributed weights shall then be placed in the boat equal to the weight of

      • (i) the proposed complement,

      • (ii) the equipment, and

      • (iii) 25 per cent of the lifeboat, complement and equipment,

      and after the weights are removed there shall be no appreciable permanent set as a result of this test; and

    • (b) a number of persons equal to the complement, each wearing a lifejacket, shall be seated in the lifeboat and the inspector shall satisfy himself that

      • (i) the oars or other means of propulsion can be handled and operated, and

      • (ii) upon all persons on one side of the centre line of the lifeboat disembarking, such persons being at least 50 per cent of the complement, the low side freeboard shall be not less than 10 per cent of the depth of the lifeboat with all persons remaining in the lifeboat maintaining their positions on one side of the centre line.

    • 23 (1) A lifeboat shall have a mean sheer at least equal to four per cent of its length, and a rise of floor of 125 mm per metre of beam.

    • (2) The form of a lifeboat shall be such that the half-girth amidships, measured over the planking from the centre of the keel to the top of the gunwale, shall be not less than 88 per cent of the sum of half the breadth amidships and the inside depth amidships, and the half-girth at the quarter lengths forward and aft shall be not less than 80 per cent of that sum.

Buoyancy

  • 24 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 1 wooden lifeboat shall be

    • (a) so placed in the lifeboat as to secure stability when the lifeboat is fully laden under adverse weather conditions; and

    • (b) equal in volume to at least 10 per cent of the cubic capacity of the lifeboat, but in a lifeboat approved for 100 or more persons the volume shall be increased as the Board may prescribe.

  • 25 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 1 lifeboat constructed of non-buoyant material shall be of a volume at least equal to that required for an equal-size wooden lifeboat, plus an additional volume of 0.049 m3 for every 50 kg of non-buoyant material used in the construction of the lifeboat, but the required buoyancy may be reduced by the Board where it is found that due to the specific gravity of the material a lesser buoyancy would be sufficient.

  • 26 The buoyancy appliances of a Class 2 lifeboat constructed of non-buoyant material shall have a volume of 0.056 m3 for every 50 kg of non-buoyant material used in the construction of the lifeboat, but the required buoyancy may be reduced by the Board where it is found that due to the specific gravity of the material a lesser buoyancy would be sufficient.

  • 27 Buoyancy appliances shall consist of metal air cases or other approved appliances.

  • 28 Buoyancy appliances consisting of metal air cases shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) they shall be constructed of annealed copper or yellow metal weighing not less than 5.5 kg/m2 but 18 B.W.G. galvanized iron or galvanized steel cases riveted and welded may be used for fresh water voyages only;

    • (b) hook joints at least 9.5 mm wide and well hammered down and soldered shall be used, and shall be double on longitudinal seams and single at the ends;

    • (c) no air case shall exceed 1 220 mm in length;

    • (d) any air case exceeding 990 mm in length, if not constructed of corrugated material, shall be fitted at mid-length with an internal diaphragm or stiffener of either metal similar to that of the case or wood, but the walls of the case shall not be pierced to effect the attachment of the diaphragm to the case; and

    • (e) plugs or nipples fitted for testing purposes shall be of non-corrodible material.

  • 29 Buoyancy appliances other than metal air cases shall be

    • (a) at least as buoyant as metal air cases of similar size;

    • (b) proof against deterioration by petroleum products and by the elements; and

    • (c) constructed of a material tested in accordance with A.S.T.M. D-1692.

Tables

  • 30 The scantlings and types of materials used in the construction of wooden lifeboats shall be in accordance with Table I to this Schedule, but the following native grown materials may be substituted:

    • (a) in Nova Scotia,

      • (i) the keel, sternpost, timbers, gunwale and hog piece may be oak,

      • (ii) the stem may be juniper or oak,

      • (iii) the thwart knees and breast hooks may be oak or juniper crooks,

      • (iv) the planking may be white pine, and

      • (v) the sheerstrake may be oak;

    • (b) in Ontario,

      • (i) the keel, stem, sternpost, timbers, gunwales, hog piece, thwart knees and breast hooks may be oak,

      • (ii) the planking may be white pine, cypress or cedar, and

      • (iii) the sheerstrake may be oak;

    • (c) in British Columbia,

      • (i) the thwart knees may be vine maple,

      • (ii) the stem, sternpost and keel may be gum wood,

      • (iii) the planking may be B.C. cedar or pine, and

      • (iv) the sheerstrake may be oak.

Lifting Hooks

    • 31 (1) Lifeboat lifting hooks and their attachments shall be in accordance with Tables III, IV, V, VI and VII to this Schedule, but alternatives to the requirements set out in Table VII will be given consideration by the Board.

    • (2) Where lifeboat lifting hooks are not in a vertical line with the falls, Type A keel connections as shown in Table V to this Schedule shall be used and the gangboards shall be slotted.

    • (3) In steel lifeboats the lifting hooks shall be connected to sling plates secured to the keel or centre girder by riveting or some other approved method of fastening.

    • (4) Where the fitting of lifeboat disengaging gear is adopted in lieu of standard lifting hooks, it shall comply with Part VI of this Schedule.

Wooden Lifeboats

  • 32 Wood used in the construction of lifeboats shall be of best quality, free from sapwood, checks and objectionable knots.

    • 33 (1) Stems and sternposts shall be rabbeted so as to receive the butt edges of the planks and to permit caulking but the length of the rabbet shall not exceed the thickness of the plank.

    • (2) Stems and sternposts shall not project above the gunwale more than is necessary for the securing of the upper breast hook and shall be so shaped so as to minimize risk of fouling by rope or wreckage.

  • 34 Aprons shall provide a 75 mm faying surface for the plank ends and shall be capable of receiving the required double fastenings therefor.

  • 35 Deadwoods shall be properly scarphed to apron and keelson.

    • 36 (1) Keels shall be in one length and shall be scarphed, vertically or horizontally, to stem and sternpost.

    • (2) Vertical scarphs shall be secured by five clenched nails and horizontal or flat scarphs shall be properly lipped and secured by at least two through fastenings.

  • 37 Stem bands shall be galvanized iron and shall extend from the breast hook over the stem head to the keel plate or 610 mm abaft the scarph.

  • 38 Planking in clinker-built lifeboats shall not exceed 140 mm in width, except that the four strakes next to the keel may be

    • (a) two at 178 mm,

    • (b) one at 165 mm, and

    • (c) one at 152 mm,

    but in lifeboats 5.5 m in length and under, these dimensions shall be reduced by 25 mm.

  • 39 Planking in clinker-built lifeboats shall be in long lengths with

    • (a) efficient shift of butts;

    • (b) at least two strakes between butts in the same timber space; and

    • (c) landings of at least 19 mm.

  • 40 Proposals for the construction of carved-built lifeboats may be considered by the Board.

  • 41 Timbers shall be bent to shape and fitted in one length from gunwale to gunwale, except at the extreme ends of the lifeboat and shall not exceed 152 mm centre to centre.

  • 42 Keelsons shall be in one length and shall overlap the deadwoods to take the sling plates.

  • 43 Keelsons shall not be cut to form a mast socket.

    • 44 (1) Bilge stringers and risings shall, where possible, be fitted in one length and secured at each timber with either a through fastening or a brass screw.

    • (2) Where bilge stringers and risings are fitted in more than one length, they shall be scarphed at the joints and backed by hardwood filling pieces between the scarph and the planking.

  • 45 Box gunwales consisting of the timber heads connected through the gunwale and sheerstrake and capped over shall be fitted in lifeboats 7.6 m in length or over.

  • 46 Gunwales shall be fitted aft with an arrangement for the steering oar and forward with a fair-lead to facilitate towing.

  • 47 Thwarts shall be fitted as low in the lifeboat as practicable and not less than the following distance below the gunwale:

    • (a) 230 mm in lifeboats 6.7 m in length and under;

    • (b) 254 mm in lifeboats over 6.7 m in length but not over 8.5 m; or

    • (c) 280 mm in lifeboats over 8.5 m in length.

  • 48 Thwarts having an unsupported length exceeding 1 525 mm shall be supported by stanchions to the keelson.

  • 49 Thwarts shall be attached to the risings with two screws at each end and shall be notched at the timbers.

  • 50 Side benches shall be continuous, permanent and fitted in as long lengths as possible.

  • 51 Gangboards shall be of the same dimensions and materials as the thwarts.

  • 52 Stretchers or lower cross seats to facilitate efficient rowing shall be fitted where necessary and, where fitted, they shall be portable.

  • 53 The casings enclosing the buoyancy appliances shall be removable and in way of the thwarts shall be strong enough to provide support.

  • 54 A plughole, so placed as to drain the lifeboat, shall be provided.

  • 55 Thwart knees shall be connected to the thwarts and to the side of the lifeboat by at least two fastenings through each arm and a hardwood chock shall be fitted below the gunwale between the vertical arm and the planking.

    • 56 (1) Breast hooks shall be of galvanized iron or oak grown to form and shall have the same scantlings as thwart knees.

    • (2) The arms of a breast hook shall extend for at least two timber spaces and shall each be through fastened by two bolts with one additional bolt through the throat.

    • (3) Lifeboats up to 7.3 m in length shall be fitted with one breast hook at each end at the level of the gunwale.

    • (4) Lifeboats over 7.3 m in length shall be fitted with two breast hooks at each end, the upper breast hook at the level of the gunwale and the lower breast hook 380 mm lower.

  • 57 Rubbers shall be fitted to all lifeboats and shall be through fastened at alternate timbers.

  • 58 Clinker-built lifeboats shall have filling pieces fitted against the plank edges from gunwale to bilge for one-third of the lifeboat’s length amidships.

    • 59 (1) Lifeboats shall be fitted with bilge keels or rails extending over the midship half of the lifeboat and secured to a doubling plank fastened to the planking and timbers.

    • (2) Bilge keel fastenings shall not penetrate the bottom planking.

  • 60 Lifeboat fastenings shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) fastenings of the keel, stem, sternpost, aprons, knees, keelson and deadwoods shall be through fastenings or, where this is impracticable, long screws;

    • (b) the hog piece shall be secured to the keel by galvanized screws 150 mm apart;

    • (c) the keelson shall be secured to the keel by through fastenings 610 mm apart;

    • (d) through bolts shall be galvanized and of not less than

      • (i) 9.5 mm diameter in lifeboats under 4.9 m in length,

      • (ii) 12.5 mm diameter in lifeboats between 4.9 and 7.3 m in length, and

      • (iii) 14 mm diameter in lifeboats over 7.3 m in length;

    • (e) plank fastenings shall be copper, properly clenched on rooves with one through each timber and one between in each edge plank in clinker-built lifeboats;

    • (f) plank scarphs shall be double fastened by at least five clenched nails in each row;

    • (g) plank edge fastenings shall have a maximum spacing of 75 mm; and

    • (h) fastenings shall not be made into end grain timber.

Steel Lifeboats

  • 61 The scantlings and materials for steel lifeboats shall comply with Table II to this Schedule.

    • 62 (1) Plating for shell, floors and like parts shall be made by the open-hearth or electric furnace process in accordance with A.S.T.M. Standard Specification A93 and the bend tests required by the specifications shall be made after the galvanizing or other anti-corrosive treatment has been applied.

    • (2) Rivets and rolled or extruded shapes such as the keel, stem, sternpost and gunwale shall be made by the open-hearth or electric furnace process in accordance with A.S.T.M. Standard Specification A7 but consideration will be given to the use of other steel having equivalent strength where longitudinal cold forming is necessary.

    • 63 (1) Riveting of shell plating shall be reduced to a minimum and all seams and butts shall be secured by electrical or other approved welding process.

    • (2) All welding shall be carried out before the material is galvanized or zinc sprayed.

    • (3) Faying surfaces of riveted plates, seams and angles shall be well coated with a protective covering to exclude moisture and, in addition, where watertightness is necessary, painted water-excluding material shall be inserted between the faying surfaces of riveted seams.

    • (4) Where riveting is employed in the construction of the shell, double riveting shall be used and the centres of the rivets in the row nearest the edge of the sheet shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm from the edge.

    • (5) Rivets shall be staggered with not less than 59 rivets to the metre and shall have countersunk heads and the diameter of the rivets shall be not less than that shown in the following table:

      TABLE

      Plating Thickness

      U.S.S.G.

      Rivet Diameter

      (millimetres)

      183
      163
      144
      134
      125
    • (6) Riveting of the shell plating to the keel, stem and sternpost shall be by botton head rivets, staggered with not less than 39 rivets to the metre and the distance from the edge of the plate to the centres of the rivets in the nearest rows shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm.

    • (7) Rivets connecting the shell to the gunwale shall be spaced not more than 75 mm on centres and the size of the rivets for connecting the shell plating to the keel, stem, sternpost and gunwale shall be 6 mm diameter for boats 8.5 m in length and under and 8 mm diameter for boats over 8.5 m in length.

    • (8) The connection of the floors to the shell shall be by a single row of rivets not less than 5 mm diameter and spaced not more than 75 mm on centres.

    • 64 (1) The keel, stem and sternpost shall be in not more than two lengths except in the case of a lifeboat of stern frame construction where three lengths may be used.

    • (2) The scarph shall have a length of nine times the thickness of the keel and shall be strapped and riveted.

    • (3) A double-V butt weld may be used without straps.

    • 65 (1) Where increased thickness of bottom plating is called for by Table II, the thicker plating shall be fitted to approximately the turn of the bilge.

    • (2) Doubling plates of suitable size shall be fitted on all lifeboats where the shell is liable to damage, wear or corrosion from contact with chocks, and doublers shall be not less than the thickness of the bottom plating.

    • (3) All seam and butt laps shall be at least 32 mm.

    • (4) The laps of joints on keel, stem and sternpost shall be at least 50 mm.

    • (5) All seam and butt laps and laps of plating on keel, stem and sternpost shall be made over felt laid in wet red lead, but other methods will be given consideration.

    • 66 (1) Floors shall be fitted in lifeboats 7.3 m in length and over and

      • (a) shall be of a thickness not less than that of the bottom plating;

      • (b) shall be at least 150 mm deep at the centre line of the boat and flanged 38 mm top and bottom; and

      • (c) shall extend to approximately the turn of the bilge.

    • (2) The maximum floor spacing for boats 8.5 m in length and under shall be 915 mm and for boats over 8.5 m in length but not over 11 m in length shall be 762 mm.

    • (3) Limber holes shall be cut in floors and shall be so located as to provide efficient drainage.

    • (4) Limber holes shall be so arranged that the load on the floors is taken by the keel as well as by the shell plating.

    • 67 (1) Gunwales shall be in not more than two pieces.

    • (2) If gunwales are fitted in two lengths, the joints shall be placed at approximately one third of the length from the stem or stern of the boat and at opposite ends of the boat and may be riveted or welded and, if riveted, the backing-up piece shall be angular in section, of the thickness of the gunwale, and the length shall be not less than eight times the depth of the gunwale but a suitable butt weld may be used without backing-up bar.

    • (3) Flanged plates made from flat bars may be substituted for angle gunwales but the legs of the angles shall be approximately equal and the inside radius of the band shall be not less than 12.5 mm nor more than 19 mm and the vertical leg shall be outside of the sheer strake.

    • (4) The outside of the gunwale angle shall have a nosing fitted to the gunwale of hollow steel, half round, 50 mm by 6 mm but if a flanged plate gunwale is used, a nosing will not be required.

    • (5) The gunwale brace shall be bent outboard at the thwart so that the bolts and nuts do not obstruct the seating space.

    • (6) Gunwales shall be secured to the thwarts by steel braces, bolts and rivets as set out in the following table:

      TABLE

      Length of Lifeboat

      (metres)

      Brace Size

      (millimetres)

      Bolts and Rivets

      (millimetres)

      6.7 and under blank line75 × 68 diameter
      6.7 and not over 8.5 blank line75 × 89.5 diameter
      Over 8.5 blank line75 × 9.511 diameter
    • (7) Gunwale braces shall be bolted to the thwarts with at least two carriage bolts of a size not less than that noted in subsection (6) and shall be riveted or welded to the gunwales.

    • (8) Where gunwale braces are riveted to the gunwale, at least two rivets of a size not less than that noted in subsection (6) shall be used.

    • (9) Bracket type gunwale braces will be given special consideration.

    • 68 (1) Breast plates shall be fitted to the stem and sternpost.

    • (2) The thickness of breast plates shall be not less than the thickness of the leg of the gunwale and the depth of the throat of the plate shall be not less than twice the depth of the gunwale.

  • 69 Thwarts, side benches, cleading, lower cross or side seats, stretchers, stanchions, bottom boards and rudder shall normally be of wood as specified for wooden lifeboats.

  • 70 A lifeboat, if fitted with an automatic plug, designed and installed to ensure complete drainage at all times when the boat is out of the water, shall be provided with a cap attached to the lifeboat by a suitable chain.

    • 71 (1) Steel or iron entering into the construction of lifeboats shall be galvanized by the hot dipped process but other methods of corrosion prevention will be given special consideration.

    • (2) Where welded construction is employed, the material shall be galvanized after welding unless it is impractical to do so in which case consideration will be given to equivalent protection.

Glass Reinforced Plastic Lifeboats (G.R.P.)

    • 72 (1) The relevant sections relating to wooden lifeboats apply to glass reinforced plastic lifeboats, except as modified in the following sections.

    • (2) In this Schedule, G.R.P means glass reinforced plastic.

  • 73 Boatbuilders who intend to build G.R.P. lifeboats, must satisfy the Board that the premises in which the lifeboats are to be built are suitable and that the employees have been properly trained for the type of work to be undertaken.

  • 74 G.R.P. lifeboats shall be made by the contact moulding method using polyester resins reinforced with glass fibre and shall comply with the requirements contained in this Schedule except that other materials, processes and techniques will receive consideration by the Board where full details are submitted and where it can be shown that such materials, processes and techniques have proved satisfactory in boat construction.

    • 75 (1) Any workshop used for moulding G.R.P. lifeboats shall be protected from the weather and shall be adequately ventilated and lighted.

    • (2) The temperature in a workshop shall be maintained between 15.5°C and 21°C and the humidity shall be kept at a low level and thermometers and a hygrometer shall be provided and placed in suitable positions.

    • (3) Draughts and direct sunlight shall be avoided and fluorescent or mercury lighting, if fitted, shall be kept well above the moulds.

  • 76 The instructions issued by the manufacturers with regard to the storage and use of materials shall be strictly adhered to.

Submission of Plans

    • 77 (1) Fully detailed plans and specifications for a prototype G.R.P. lifeboat shall be submitted to the Board for approval and shall include

      • (a) a diagrammatic section showing the proposed lay-up, with a single line representing each layer of reinforcement;

      • (b) a description of the method of fabrication;

      • (c) a longitudinal strength calculation showing the stresses that will arise in the gunwale and keel when the lifeboat is fully loaded and suspended by the lifting hooks and for the purpose of this calculation the bending moment shall be taken as WL/6

        where W is the weight of the fully laden lifeboat and L is the distance between the lifting hooks but where alternative positions are provided for the lifting hooks L is the maximum span and these stresses shall not normally exceed 7 722 kPa;

      • (d) the names of the manufacturers of the materials and, where applicable, the reference numbers of the materials;

      • (e) the resin formulations for the various parts of the lay-up and details of the additives, including catalyst and accelerator, shall be quoted in parts by weight to 100 parts of resin; and

      • (f) the resin/glass ratio.

    • (2) The resin formulation, resin to glass ratio, gel times, time allowable between successive laminating operations and time and temperature curing conditions shall comply with the resin manufacturer’s recommendations.

Materials

    • 78 (1) Resins and glass fibre reinforcements used in the construction of lifeboats shall be of types recommended by the manufacturers for boatbuilding and shall be approved by the Board.

    • (2) Resins shall be suitable for laminates that will be subjected to stress within a temperature range of from +65.5°C to -30°C and shall be formulated to have a gel time of less than one hour.

    • (3) Glass fibre reinforcements shall be of the low alkali “E” glass type containing not more than one per cent alkali, calculated as Na2O.

    • (4) Chopped strand mats shall be used for the main lay-up and these shall not exceed a nominal 610 g/m2 in weight.

    • (5) Woven cloths, rovings and tapes may be approved for parts of the lifeboat that are considered to be suitable for their application.

    • (6) Woven glass fibre reinforcements if used shall be in the desized state and finished so as to provide good resin to glass adhesion and laminated wet strength retention.

    • (7) Wood or metal inserts shall not be used unless full details of the proposed method for incorporating them in the boat structure are submitted to and approved by the Board.

    • (8) Any surface of the moulding that will be exposed to the atmosphere or to water shall be provided with a gel coat.

    • (9) Surfaces that may be walked upon shall provide a good non-slip foothold.

Specimen of Laminate

    • 79 (1) Before a process of laminating is approved, the boatbuilder shall prepare a sample laminate to be submitted for assessment of degree of cure to an authority approved by the Board.

    • (2) A sample laminate shall be flat, 300 mm square and made with 610 g/m2 (or equivalent) chopped strand mats and the chopped strand mats, the resin mix, the resin to glass ratio, gel coat and the curing conditions for the sample laminate shall be as proposed for the lifeboat.

Fire Retarding Agents and other Fillers

    • 80 (1) Mouldings for a G.R.P. lifeboat shall be made of self-extinguishing laminates.

    • (2) A specimen shall be cut from the sample referred to in section 79 and shall be tested in a draught free atmosphere as follows:

      • (a) three test specimens, each approximately 150 mm long by 13 mm wide shall be used; each specimen shall be marked by scribing a line 25 mm from one end; the other end shall be clamped in a support so that the longitudinal axis of the specimen is horizontal and the transverse axis inclined at 45° to the horizontal; a clean piece of 18 mesh wire gauze about 125 mm square shall be clamped under the specimen in a horizontal position 6 mm below the edge of the specimen, and with about 13 mm of the specimen extending beyond the edge of the gauze;

      • (b) a bunsen burner with a minimum outside diameter of 11 mm and a luminous flame 13 to 19 mm in height shall be placed under the free end of the specimen for 30 seconds, then the bunsen flame shall be removed and the specimen allowed to burn;

      • (c) if the flame on the specimen is extinguished before reaching the 25 mm mark, the bunsen burner shall be placed under the free end for a second period of 30 seconds immediately following the extinction of the first flame; and

      • (d) if the flame is again extinguished before reaching the 25 mm mark on each of the three test specimens, the laminate from which they were cut shall be regarded as self-extinguishing.

    • (3) The self-extinguishing property shall be imparted to the whole of the laminate, including the gel coat.

    • (4) An approved self-extinguishing resin shall be used, or, alternatively, fire retarding agents may be added by the boatbuilder to a non-self-extinguishing resin, which shall be of a type approved by the Board.

    • (5) Where fire retarding agents are added to a resin, the amounts used shall be limited so that the antimony trioxide and chlorinated paraffin wax do not exceed a combined total of 20 parts by weight to 100 parts of resin.

    • (6) Fillers other than fire retarding agents shall be limited so that the total quantity of fillers, excluding the fire retarding agents, does not exceed 10 parts by weight to 100 parts of resin.

    • (7) Fillers used shall be recommended by the resin manufacturers.

Bonded, Riveted, Bolted and Screwed Connections

    • 81 (1) Where half shell mouldings are used for a lifeboat, or internal glass reinforced plastic structures such as buoyancy units, bulkheads, floors, seats and thwarts are not laid-up integral with the shell, full details of the proposed methods for fixing and joining these items shall be submitted to the Board.

    • (2) The following means of connection are acceptable for use in G.R.P. work:

      • (a) surfaces to be bonded shall be roughened and thoroughly cleaned, the gel coats shall be removed in way of the surface, and the total thickness of fillet bonding strips shall be approximately equal to the thickness of the thinner of the parts being joined;

      • (b) rivets shall be cold-driven, the heads and points bearing on strips, plates or washers of appropriate material with precautions against bimetallic corrosion being taken, a suitable compound shall be used when a watertight joint is required, the rivets shall be dipped in resin or other suitable sealant to seal the exposed fibres in the holes and the minimum distance between the centre of the rivet hole and the edge of the G.R.P. material shall be three times the diameter of the hole;

      • (c) the requirements for bolted joints are the same as for riveted joints and bolts shall be made of a non-corrodible material other than copper or its alloys and the holes shall be of just sufficient diameter to take the bolts; and

      • (d) screwing is acceptable only for the connection of items of relatively minor importance where a better type of connection cannot be readily used and in such cases, bolts or screws of coarse thread shall be used.

Internal Buoyancy

    • 82 (1) Loose buoyancy tanks of a lifeboat shall be constructed and placed as described in sections 24 to 29 of this Schedule.

    • (2) Built-in buoyancy tanks that are not filled with an approved buoyancy material shall not exceed 915 mm in length and shall be tested to an air pressure of 10.3 kPa and means shall be provided for periodic inspection and testing.

    • (3) Buoyancy tanks for prototype G.R.P. lifeboats subjected to strength testing shall be tested to an air pressure of not less than 10.3 kPa both before and after the tests.

    • (4) Where it is proposed to fill the buoyancy tanks with materials, full details shall be submitted to the Board.

Painting

  • 83 Painting of a G.R.P. lifeboat shall be done only after the moulding is fully cured and a water resistant grade of pre-treatment primer or an epoxide based primer paint shall be used followed by any of the usual finishing coatings and silicone and wax release agents shall not be used for surfaces that are to be painted.

  • 84 A plug hole with a non-corrodible socket shall be provided at a suitable position to drain the lifeboat and the socket shall be designed to provide watertight protection to the edge of the hole.

Tests of the Completed Boat

    • 85 (1) A prototype G.R.P. lifeboat shall be tested as prescribed in section 21 and paragraph 22(b) of this Schedule, and shall be subjected to the additional tests prescribed in subsections (2) to (6).

    • (2) A 100 per cent overload test shall be made with the lifeboat suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and evenly distributed weights shall be loaded incrementally and measurements at full load, 25 per cent, 50 per cent, 75 per cent and 100 per cent overloads shall be recorded as follows:

      • (a) deflection of keel amidships,

      • (b) change in length as measured between the top of stem and stern post,

      • (c) change in breadth over the gunwale, and

      • (d) change in depth measured from gunwale to keel,

      and when the lifeboat is subject to 25 per cent overload, the keel deflection and change of breadth shall not exceed 1/400 part of the lifeboat’s length and the results at 100 per cent overload shall be approximately in proportion to those at 25 per cent overload.

    • (3) The lifeboat shall be loaded with evenly distributed weights equal to the weight of the equipment, food, water and persons to be carried and shall then be suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and dropped into the water from a height of 2.29 m, the height being measured from the keel to the water.

    • (4) The lifeboat shall be loaded as for the test prescribed in subsection (3) and then suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear with the falls 6.1 m in length and arranged so that the gunwale on one side of the boat is about 50 mm from a stationary wall or other structure of similar rigidity and the lifeboat shall then be moved outboard a distance of 2.44 m horizontal from its original position and shall be allowed to swing freely and strike the wall along one side.

    • (5) Before the tests prescribed in subsections (3) and (4) are carried out, and with the boat suspended freely by the lifting hooks or releasing gear and loaded to its davit stowage condition, the keel shall be marked at each end in way of the lifting hooks and at amidships, and the length, breadth and depth of the boat measured and the measurements shall be checked after the tests and any permanent deflection recorded.

    • (6) If a motor or mechanically propelled lifeboat is to be strength tested and it is considered necessary to remove parts of the machinery to avoid damage to them, weights shall be added to compensate for the removal of the parts.

PART IV

Motor Lifeboats

  • 86 A motor lifeboat shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) it shall be fitted with a compression ignition engine;

    • (b) it shall be provided with sufficient fuel for 24-hour operation;

    • (c) it shall be capable of going astern; and

    • (d) it shall be capable of a speed, fully loaded in smooth water, of

      • (i) six knots in the case of passenger ships carrying more than 12 passengers, tankers, whale factories and fish processing ships, or

      • (ii) four knots in the case of other ships.

  • 87 A motor lifeboat engine shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) it shall be capable of starting readily and running reliably in cold weather;

    • (b) it shall operate properly under conditions of at least 10 degrees list and 10 degrees trim;

    • (c) its circulating water pumps shall be self-priming;

    • (d) it shall be adequately protected, together with its fuel tanks and accessories, from heavy weather;

    • (e) in a wooden lifeboat, there shall be a metal tray under the engine and fuel tank;

    • (f) its casing shall be of fireproof material;

    • (g) it shall be efficiently ventilated; and

    • (h) the fuel tank shall be capable of withstanding a 4.57 m head of water, shall have suitable filling and relief arrangements, and if made of steel, shall be galvanized externally.

  • 88 A lifeboat that is fitted with a fixed VHF radiotelephone apparatus shall

    • (a) be equipped with a cabin that is large enough to accommodate the apparatus and the person using it; and

    • (b) if the antenna of the apparatus is separately mounted, be provided with a device for installing and securing the antenna in its operating position.

  • 89 [Repealed, SOR/96-218, s. 41]

  • 90 The buoyancy appliances of a motor lifeboat shall be equal in volume to those of a non-motor lifeboat of equal size with an additional volume to compensate for the difference between

    • (a) the weight of the motor, its accessories, the radio apparatus and searchlight where fitted; and

    • (b) the weight of persons who could occupy the space occupied by the motor, its accessories, the radio apparatus and searchlight if this equipment were not fitted.

    The following is a worked example of the calculation for such cases:

    Wooden Motor Lifeboat, Class 1

    Dimensionsblank lineLblank lineBblank lineD

    of boatblank line= 8.5 × 2.62 × 1.17

    Persons

    Capacity by formula

    L × B × D × .6 blank line

    =15.63 m3=55

    Motor space

    1.37 × .76 × 1.17 = 1.22 m3

    Radio room

    1.1 × 1.19 × 1.17 = 1.53 m3

    } =2.75 m3
    Net capacity blank line12.88 m3
    Maximum number of persons allowable blank line=

    45

    Number of persons displaced blank line=

    10

    Minimum internal buoyancy required blank line

    blank line

    blank line1.56 m3

    Weight of motor and accessories (including  weight of fuel tanks but not fuel) blank line

    =

    610 kg

    Weight of radio and searchlight appliances and  accessories such as batteries, etc blank line

    =

    203 kg

    813 kg

    Buoyancy = 1025 kg/m3813 ÷ 1025  blank line

    =

    .793 m3

    Less buoyancy for 10 persons displaced at .0283  m3 each blank line

    =

    .283 m3

    .51

    blank line  .51 m3

    blank line

    blank line

    blank line2.07 m3

    Internal buoyancy required for 45 persons  subject to a seating test blank line

    =

    2.07 m3

    Internal buoyancy required for 32 persons being  the number determined by seating test blank line

    =

    1.72 m3

PART VMechanically Propelled Lifeboats

  • 91 A mechanically propelled lifeboat other than a motor lifeboat shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) the propelling gear shall, if manually operated, be readily operable by untrained persons;

    • (b) the propelling gear shall be operable with the lifeboat flooded;

    • (c) the propelling gear shall be readily available for service;

    • (d) the propelling gear shall not hinder the entry of persons into the lifeboat;

    • (e) sufficient power shall be available to enable the lifeboat to clear the ship’s side readily and to maintain course in a seaway, whether partially or fully loaded;

    • (f) means shall be provided to enable the helmsman to cause the lifeboat to go astern while the propelling gear is in operation; and

    • (g) the buoyancy appliances shall, where necessary, be increased to compensate for the weight of the propelling gear, in a manner similar to that prescribed for motor lifeboats.

PART VIDisengaging Gear

  • 92 Lifeboat disengaging gear shall comply with the following requirements:

    • (a) the gear shall be so arranged as to ensure simultaneous release of both ends of the lifeboat;

    • (b) the means of effecting release shall be placed aft;

    • (c) the gear shall be of a type that will permit the release of the lifeboat only when it is waterborne;

    • (d) the gear shall be of a type that will permit release if there is a towing strain on the link or falls;

    • (e) the hooks shall be suitable for instant unhooking by hand;

    • (f) the point of attachment of the hook to the eye, ring or link of the block shall not be lower than when ordinary fixed hooks are fitted;

    • (g) the gear and mechanism for effecting release shall be so constructed and arranged as to ensure the safety of the lifeboat independently of any safety pins;

    • (h) the means for effecting release shall be by hauling on or letting go a line or by using a lever and if release is effected by a pull upon a line, the line shall be properly cased in, rods or other connections between hooks shall also be cased in for the protection of persons from injury, the fair leads shall be properly arranged to prevent the lines from jamming or nipping and shall be strongly attached to permanent parts of the lifeboat, and the lines shall be fitted with chains where necessary for efficiency;

    • (i) such parts of the gear as would otherwise be likely to be set fast by rust or corrosion shall be made of non-corrodible metal;

    • (j) no part of the gear taking the weight of the lifeboat shall be made of cast metal; and

    • (k) the scantlings and proportions of all parts that support the weight of the lifeboat shall be designed to provide a breaking strength proportionate to a load of at least 2 1/2 times the weight of the heaviest loaded lifeboat in which the gear is intended to be fitted.

TABLE IStandard Scantlings (Finished Sizes) for Wood Lifeboats

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE II

Steel Lifeboats

Length of Boat Not overBar keel, Stem, and SternpostGunwalesShell PlatingThwartsStanchionsPainter Shackles Nominal SizeRudder Thickness
Angle barFlanged Flat BarSideBottomNumber RequiredDistance from top of thwart to top of gunwaleSize
metresmmmmmmUSSGUSSGNo.mmmmmmmmmm
3.764×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
4.364×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
4.964×1351×38×689×61818422927×19127× 891625
5.564×1651×38×6102×61818422933×19133× 891625
6.164×1951×38×6102×61616522933×19133× 891625
6.764×1951×38×6102×61614522933×19133× 891932
7.376×1964×51×6114×61614525444×24144×1401932
7.976×1964×51×6114×61413625444×24144×1401932
8.589×1964×64×6127×61312625444×24144×1401932
9.189×1964×64×6127×61312727944×24144×1401932
9.8102×1964×64×6127×61312727944×29244×1401932
10.4102×1964×64×8127×81212827944×29244×1401932
11.0102×2564×64×8127×81212827944×29244×1401932
  • Hoisting shackles, if provided, shall have a factor of safety of six based on the lowering weight of the fully loaded lifeboat.

TABLE IIILifting Hooks for Lifeboats

Standard Sizes for Lifting Hooks of Round Section, and Keel Plates

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE IVDetails of Lifting Hooks

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE C.R.C., C. 1436, PP. 12376 TO 12379; SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VDetails of Keel Connection

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VIDetails of Keel Construction

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

TABLE VIILifting Hooks for Boats 4.9 M and Under

GRAPHIC IS NOT DISPLAYED, SEE SOR/80-685, S. 63

  • SOR/78-216, s. 3
  • SOR/78-561, s. 2
  • SOR/80-685, ss. 30 to 63
  • SOR/81-430, s. 2
  • 1987, c. 7, s. 84(F). SOR/96-218, ss. 38 to 41
  • SOR/2000-261, s. 23
  • SOR/2001-179, s. 58
 
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