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Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2022-06-20 and last amended on 2022-03-06. Previous Versions

Part VII — Commercial Air Services (continued)

Subpart 5 — Airline Operations (continued)

Division V — Aircraft Equipment Requirements (continued)

Cargo and Baggage Compartment Fire Protection

 After June 1, 2004, no person shall operate a transport category aeroplane in respect of which an initial type certificate was issued after January 1, 1958 unless each cargo or baggage compartment of the aeroplane meets the requirements set out in section 725.81 of Standard 725 — Airline Operations — Aeroplanes of the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • SOR/2003-361, s. 1
Pitot Heat Indication System

 After June 30, 2008, no person shall conduct a take-off in a transport category aeroplane, or in a non-transport category aeroplane in respect of which a type certificate was issued after December 31, 1964, that is equipped with a flight instrument Pitot heating system unless the aeroplane is also equipped with a Pitot heat indication system that meets the requirements of section 525.1326 of Chapter 525 — Transport Category Aeroplanes of the Airworthiness Manual.

  • SOR/2007-78, s. 3
ACAS
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (4), no air operator shall operate a turbine-powered aeroplane in airspace outside RVSM airspace unless the aeroplane is equipped with an operative ACAS that

    • (a) meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C119a or a more recent version of it or other requirements that the Minister has accepted as providing a level of safety that is at least equivalent to the level that that CAN-TSO provides; and

    • (b) is equipped with a Mode S transponder that meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C112 or a more recent version of it.

  • (2) Subject to subsection (4), no air operator shall operate an aeroplane that is not a turbine-powered aeroplane in airspace outside RVSM airspace unless the aeroplane is equipped with an operative ACAS that

    • (a) meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C118 or a more recent version of it or other requirements that the Minister has accepted as providing a level of safety that is at least equivalent to the level that that CAN-TSO provides; or

    • (b) meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C119a or a more recent version of it or other requirements that the Minister has accepted as providing a level of safety that is at least equivalent to the level that that CAN-TSO provides and is equipped with a Mode S transponder that meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C112 or a more recent version of it.

  • (3) Subject to subsection (4), no air operator shall operate an aeroplane referred to in subsection (1) or (2) in RVSM airspace unless the aeroplane is equipped with an operative ACAS that

    • (a) meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C119b or a more recent version of it or other requirements that the Minister has accepted as providing a level of safety that is at least equivalent to the level that that CAN-TSO provides; and

    • (b) is equipped with a Mode S transponder that meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C112 or a more recent version of it.

  • (4) The air operator may operate the aeroplane without its being equipped with an operative ACAS if

    • (a) where a minimum equipment list has not been approved by the Minister and subject to subsection 605.08(1), the operation takes place within the three days after the date of failure of the ACAS; or

    • (b) it is necessary for the pilot-in-command to deactivate, in the interests of aviation safety, the ACAS or any of its modes and the pilot-in-command does so in accordance with the aircraft flight manual, aircraft operating manual, flight manual supplement or minimum equipment list.

  • (5) This section does not apply in respect of aeroplanes manufactured on or before the day on which this section comes into force until two years after that day.

  • SOR/2007-133, s. 9
  • SOR/2009-280, ss. 37, 38(E), 39 to 42
TAWS
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no air operator shall operate an aeroplane unless the aeroplane is equipped with an operative TAWS that

    • (a) meets the requirements for Class A equipment set out in CAN-TSO-C151a or a more recent version of it;

    • (b) meets the altitude accuracy requirements set out in section 551.102 of Chapter 551 of the Airworthiness Manual; and

    • (c) has a terrain and airport database compatible with the area of operation and a terrain awareness and situational display.

  • (2) The air operator may operate the aeroplane without its being equipped with an operative TAWS if

    • (a) in the event that a minimum equipment list has not been approved by the Minister and subject to subsection 605.08(1), the operation takes place within the three days after the day on which the failure of the TAWS occurs; or

    • (b) it is necessary for the pilot-in-command to deactivate, in the interests of aviation safety, the TAWS or any of its modes and the pilot-in-command does so in accordance with the aircraft flight manual, aircraft operating manual, flight manual supplement or minimum equipment list.

  • (3) This section does not apply in respect of aeroplanes manufactured on or before the day on which this section comes into force until the day that is two years after that day.

[705.85 to 705.88 reserved]

Division VI — Emergency Equipment

Megaphones

 No person shall operate, with passengers on board, an aeroplane for which a type certificate has been issued authorizing the transport of 60 or more passengers, unless the following number of portable battery-powered megaphones are carried on board the aeroplane and are conveniently located and readily available for use by the flight attendants:

  • (a) for each passenger deck, at least one megaphone;

  • (b) 61 to 99 passenger seats, one megaphone; and

  • (c) 100 or more passenger seats, two megaphones.

First Aid Kits
  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by an air operator that is configured as follows unless, for the purposes of paragraph 602.60(1)(h), the corresponding number of first aid kits is carried on board and each kit contains the supplies and equipment set out in the Aviation Occupational Health and Safety Regulations:

    • (a) configured for 0 to 50 passenger seats, one kit;

    • (b) configured for 51 to 150 passenger seats, two kits;

    • (c) configured for 151 to 250 passenger seats, three kits; and

    • (d) configured for 251 or more passenger seats, four kits.

  • (2) No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by an air operator unless

    • (a) the first aid kits referred to in subsection (1) are distributed throughout the cabin and are readily available to crew members and passengers;

    • (b) each first aid kit is clearly identified; and

    • (c) if a first aid kit is stowed in a bin or compartment, the bin or compartment is clearly marked as containing a first aid kit.

Emergency Medical Kit

 No person shall operate an aircraft that has a seating configuration, excluding crew seats, of more than 100 unless an emergency medical kit that meets the Commercial Air Service Standards is carried on board the aircraft.

Crash Axe

 No person shall operate an aircraft unless a crash axe is carried on board the aircraft.

Hand-held Fire Extinguishers
  •  (1) No person shall operate an aircraft unless hand-held fire extinguishers for use in the flight deck, passenger compartment and cargo compartment are carried on board the aircraft.

  • (2) The type and quantity of extinguishing agent shall be suitable for extinguishing fires that are likely to occur in the flight deck, passenger compartment or cargo compartment where the extinguisher is intended to be used and, in the case of the extinguishing agent for extinguishers intended to be used in the passenger compartment, shall be designed to minimize the hazard of toxic gas concentrations.

  • (3) At least one hand-held fire extinguisher shall be conveniently located and readily available for immediate use in each class E cargo compartment that is accessible to crew members during flight, and at least one hand-held fire extinguisher shall be located in each isolated galley.

  • (4) At least one hand-held fire extinguisher shall be conveniently located on the flight deck and readily available for immediate use by the flight crew members.

  • (5) The following number of hand-held fire extinguishers shall be conveniently located, readily available for immediate use and uniformly distributed throughout the passenger compartment on each deck:

    • (a) 60 or fewer passenger seats, two extinguishers;

    • (b) 61 to 200 passenger seats, three extinguishers;

    • (c) 201 or more passenger seats, one extra extinguisher for each additional unit of 100 passenger seats.

  • (6) At least two hand-held fire extinguishers shall contain Halon 1211 (bromochlorodifluoromethane) or its equivalent.

  • (7) A stowage compartment or stowage container that contains a hand-held fire extinguisher shall be clearly marked as to its contents.

Portable Oxygen

 No person shall operate a pressurized aircraft above FL 250 unless

  • (a) there is readily available to each flight attendant on board portable oxygen equipment with a 15-minute supply of oxygen; or

  • (b) sufficient portable oxygen units with masks, or spare outlets and masks, to ensure an immediate supply of oxygen to each flight attendant are distributed throughout the cabin.

Survival Equipment
  •  (1) No air operator shall operate an aircraft, other than an aircraft referred to in subsection 602.61(2), unless a survival manual is carried on board that contains information about how to use the survival equipment that is carried on board to meet the requirements of subsection 602.61(1).

  • (2) No air operator shall operate an aircraft on board of which life rafts are required to be carried in accordance with section 602.63 unless the survival kit referred to in paragraph 602.63(6)(c) contains

    • (a) a life raft repair kit;

    • (b) a bailing bucket and a sponge;

    • (c) a whistle;

    • (d) a waterproof flashlight;

    • (e) a supply of potable water — based on 500 mL per person and calculated using the rated capacity of the life raft — or a means of desalting or distilling salt water that can provide 500 mL of potable water per person;

    • (f) a waterproof survival manual that contains information about how to use the survival equipment;

    • (g) a first aid kit that contains antiseptic swabs, burn dressing compresses, bandages and motion sickness pills; and

    • (h) a pyrotechnic signalling device, or an aviation visual distress signal that has a marking applied by the manufacturer indicating that the signal meets the requirements of CAN-TSO-C168, a signalling mirror and a dye marker for visually signalling distress.

  • (3) Despite subsection (2), if there is insufficient space in the attached survival kit, a supplemental survival kit shall be stowed adjacent to each required life raft and contain

    • (a) a supply of potable water — based on 500 mL per person and calculated using the rated capacity of the life raft — or a means of desalting or distilling salt water that can provide 500 mL of potable water per person; and

    • (b) motion sickness pills.

Inspection Requirements

 No air operator shall operate an aircraft unless the emergency equipment carried on board under Division II of Subpart 2 of Part VI and this Division is inspected at the intervals recommended by the equipment manufacturer.

Flashlights

 Each flight attendant required under section 705.201 shall have a flashlight readily available for use.

  • SOR/2015-127, s. 17

[705.98 to 705.102 reserved]

Division VII — Personnel Requirements

Designation of Pilot-in-command and Second-in-command

 An air operator shall designate for each flight a pilot-in-command and a second-in-command.

 [Reserved, SOR/2015-127, s. 18]

 [Reserved, SOR/2015-127, s. 18]

Pilot Qualifications
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (3), no air operator shall permit a person to act and no person shall act as the pilot-in-command, second-in-command or cruise relief pilot of an aircraft unless the person

    • (a) holds the licence, ratings and endorsements required by Part IV;

    • (b) within the previous 90 days,

      • (i) has completed at least three take-offs and three landings as the pilot at the controls and one sector assigned to duty as a flight crew member in an aircraft of that type,

      • (ii) has completed five sectors assigned to duty as a flight crew member in an aircraft of that type, or

      • (iii) has fulfilled the training requirements set out in the Commercial Air Service Standards;

    • (c) has successfully completed a pilot proficiency check, the validity period of which has not expired, for that type of aircraft, in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards;

    • (d) has successfully completed or is undergoing a line check or line indoctrination training, the validity period of which has not expired, for that type of aircraft, in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards; and

    • (e) has fulfilled the requirements of the air operator’s training program.

  • (2) A pilot who does not meet the requirements of subparagraph (1)(b)(i) or (ii) shall regain competency in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (3) An air operator may permit a person to act and a person may act as the pilot-in-command or second-in-command of an aircraft where the person does not meet the requirements of subsection (1), if

    • (a) the aircraft is operated on a training, ferry or positioning flight; or

    • (b) the air operator

      • (i) is authorized to do so in its air operator certificate, and

      • (ii) complies with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

  • (4) A pilot shall, on successful completion of a pilot proficiency check, meet the requirements of the consolidation period in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards.

Flight Engineer and Second Officer Qualifications
  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no air operator shall permit a person to act and no person shall act as a flight engineer or a second officer on board an aircraft unless

    • (a) the person holds the licence and endorsements required by Part IV;

    • (b) the air operator has determined, by means of a check in flight or in a flight simulator that has been approved by the Minister under Subpart 6 of Part VI, that the person meets the Commercial Air Service Standards for that type of aircraft, or the person has, within the previous six months, completed at least 50 hours of flight time as a flight engineer on an aircraft of that type;

    • (c) the person has successfully completed or is undergoing line indoctrination training for that type of aircraft, in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards; and

    • (d) the person has fulfilled the requirements of the air operator’s training program.

  • (2) A person who is qualified to act as a pilot-in-command or a second-in-command in accordance with section 705.106 may act as a second officer on board an aircraft during the cruise portion of a flight, if

    • (a) the person has received initial and annual recurrent training in normal and emergency procedures pertaining to the cruise portion of the flight, in accordance with the Commercial Air Service Standards; and

    • (b) the air operator has determined, by means of a check, that the person meets the Commercial Air Service Standards for that type of aircraft.

 
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