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Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2022-06-20 and last amended on 2022-03-06. Previous Versions

Part VI — General Operating and Flight Rules (continued)

Subpart 4 — Private Operators (continued)

Division X — Training Program (continued)

Flight Crew Members — Level B, C or D Flight Simulator

 Subject to sections 604.172 to 604.174, a private operator may provide the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) and sections 604.177 and 604.178 to a flight crew member either on board an aircraft or using a level B, C or D flight simulator. However, if the private operator provides the training using a level B flight simulator, the private operator shall provide training in respect of the following activities on board an aircraft:

  • (a) pre-flight checks of the interior and exterior of the aircraft;

  • (b) aircraft manoeuvres on the ground;

  • (c) normal take-offs and landings;

  • (d) crosswind take-offs and landings;

  • (e) a visual circuit, if the flight is conducted in VMC;

  • (f) approaches and landings with an engine simulated inoperative;

  • (g) simulated engine failure procedures during a take-off and a missed approach;

  • (h) approaches and landings without electronic glide slope indication;

  • (i) a circling approach, if applicable; and

  • (j) any other approach for which a level B flight simulator lacks the capability.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — Level C or D Flight Simulator

 A private operator may provide the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) and sections 604.177 and 604.178 to a flight crew member using only a level C or D flight simulator if

  • (a) the flight crew member has acquired flight time on an aircraft certificated in the same category, and with engines using the same principle of propulsion, as the aircraft on which the flight crew member is to be trained; and

  • (b) the private operator provides to the flight crew member, using the same flight simulator, training in respect of the following activities under variable visual meteorological conditions of dusk and night, or day and night:

    • (i) aircraft manoeuvres on the ground,

    • (ii) normal take-offs and landings and crosswind take-offs and landings, up to 100% of the crosswind component specified by the aircraft manufacturer,

    • (iii) encounters with moderate to severe in-flight icing conditions,

    • (iv) simulated line flights that include at least one sector in which the flight crew member acts as pilot flying and at least one sector in which the flight crew member acts as pilot not flying or pilot monitoring,

    • (v) visual circuits and landings with variable wind, runway illusion and runway surface conditions,

    • (vi) approaches and landings with an engine simulated inoperative,

    • (vii) approaches and landings without electronic glide slope indication,

    • (viii) approaches and landings with flight control failures and abnormalities, if applicable, and

    • (ix) engine failure procedures during a take-off and a missed approach.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — Level D Flight Simulator

 A private operator may provide the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) and sections 604.177 and 604.178 to a flight crew member using only a level D flight simulator if

  • (a) the flight crew member has at least 1,000 hours of flight time as a flight crew member;

  • (b) in the case of training provided on an aircraft that requires a minimum flight crew of two pilots, the flight crew member holds an individual type rating for an aircraft that requires a minimum flight crew of two pilots; and

  • (c) the private operator provides the training referred to in paragraph 604.172(b) to the flight crew member using that simulator.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — Turbo-jet-powered Aeroplane or Transport Category Aircraft — Level C or D Flight Simulator

 A private operator who operates a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane or transport category aircraft shall provide the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) and sections 604.177 and 604.178 to a flight crew member using a level C or D flight simulator if a level C or D flight simulator is used for that aircraft type in Canada, the United States or Mexico.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — Compatibility of Flight Simulators

 A flight simulator that differs from the private operator’s aircraft with respect to installed equipment, systems, cockpit configuration, engine type or performance may be used for the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) and sections 604.177 and 604.178 if

  • (a) the flight simulator has performance and handling characteristics equivalent to those of the private operator’s aircraft; and

  • (b) the private operator’s training program takes into account the differences between the flight simulator and the aircraft.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — High Altitude Indoctrination Training

 The component of the training program for flight crew members who will operate an aircraft above 13,000 feet ASL shall include the following elements:

  • (a) physiological phenomena in a low pressure environment, including

    • (i) the effects on respiration,

    • (ii) the symptoms and effects of hypoxia,

    • (iii) the duration of consciousness at various altitudes without supplemental oxygen, and

    • (iv) the effects of gas expansion and gas bubble formation; and

  • (b) the factors associated with rapid or explosive loss of pressurization, including

    • (i) the most likely causes of the loss of pressurization,

    • (ii) the increased level of noise, the change in cabin temperature and cabin fogging,

    • (iii) the effects on objects located near a point of fuselage failure, and

    • (iv) the actions to be taken by flight crew members immediately after the loss of pressurization and the aircraft attitude likely to result from those actions.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — One-engine Inoperative Ferry Flights

 The component of the training program for flight crew members who will operate an aircraft during a one-engine inoperative ferry flight under a flight permit issued under section 507.04 shall include training in the operational procedures and limits specified in the aircraft flight manual.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Crew Members — Upgrade to Pilot-in-Command

 The component of the training program for flight crew members who have served as second-in-command and who are to be upgraded to pilot-in-command shall include the following elements:

  • (a) the elements of the training referred to in subsection 604.170(1) that are related to the duties of a pilot-in-command;

  • (b) training on the responsibilities of a pilot-in-command in relation to the use and operation of an aircraft;

  • (c) in the case of a flight crew member who will conduct an operation under a special authorization, the training required to conduct that operation as pilot-in-command; and

  • (d) crew resource management.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Attendants

 The component of the training program for flight attendants shall include the following elements:

  • (a) the roles and responsibilities of the private operator and crew members;

  • (b) the coordination of crew member duties and crew resource management;

  • (c) aircraft communications systems and communication procedures in normal, abnormal and emergency conditions;

  • (d) the content of the briefings given to passengers and crew members;

  • (e) cabin and passenger safety checks;

  • (f) aircraft surface contamination procedures;

  • (g) procedures relating to passengers requiring special treatment;

  • (h) requirements and procedures relating to seats and restraint systems for passengers and crew members;

  • (i) procedures for accepting and stowing carry-on baggage, and any applicable restrictions;

  • (j) policies and procedures relating to the use of portable electronic devices;

  • (k) procedures for fuelling with passengers on board;

  • (l) procedures relating to passenger service when the aircraft is on the ground;

  • (m) safety procedures relating to take-offs, landings and aircraft movements on the surface;

  • (n) safety procedures relating to the embarkation and disembarkation of passengers and their movement on the apron;

  • (o) procedures relating to passenger and crew member safety during periods of in-flight turbulence;

  • (p) procedures for entering the flight deck and for serving beverages and meals to flight crew members;

  • (q) procedures for dealing with the incapacitation of a crew member;

  • (r) the location and operation of, and any safety instructions relating to, the various types of cabin exits and the flight deck escape routes;

  • (s) the operation of cabin systems and of safety and emergency equipment by flight attendants in normal and abnormal conditions;

  • (t) the actions to be taken with respect to the equipment identified on the minimum equipment list and intended for use by flight attendants;

  • (u) the actions to be taken in the event of fumes or smoke in the cabin and to prevent fumes or smoke in the vicinity of the aircraft from entering the cabin;

  • (v) fire detection, fire-fighting systems and fire-fighting procedures;

  • (w) procedures in the event of loss of cabin pressurization;

  • (x) how to identify the need for administering supplemental oxygen, and procedures for administering the oxygen;

  • (y) procedures for the evacuation of passengers and crew members; and

  • (z) training that includes the performance of the following emergency procedures:

    • (i) the use of the public address and interphone systems,

    • (ii) the briefing of passengers,

    • (iii) the operation and use of the emergency exits on each type of aircraft to which the flight attendant will be assigned,

    • (iv) emergency evacuation procedures,

    • (v) if the flight attendants will be assigned to an aircraft equipped with life preservers, the donning and inflation of life preservers,

    • (vi) if the flight attendants will be assigned to an aircraft equipped with an evacuation slide, the identification of the location of the manual inflation handle and the disconnect handle, and an evacuation using the slide,

    • (vii) if the flight attendants will be assigned to an aircraft equipped with either first aid oxygen equipment or portable oxygen equipment, the operation and use of that equipment,

    • (viii) if the flight attendants will be assigned to an aircraft equipped with life rafts, the removal of life rafts from the stowage compartment and the deployment, inflation and boarding of life rafts, and

    • (ix) fire fighting, including the use of a fire extinguisher on an actual fire.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Flight Dispatchers and Flight Followers
  •  (1) The component of the training program for flight dispatchers shall include the following elements:

    • (a) the content of the private operator’s operations manual;

    • (b) the provisions of these Regulations, and of related standards, that affect the responsibilities of a flight dispatcher;

    • (c) flight planning and the private operator’s standard operating procedures;

    • (d) radiocommunication procedures;

    • (e) aircraft fuelling procedures;

    • (f) aircraft surface contamination procedures;

    • (g) the use of minimum equipment lists;

    • (h) meteorological conditions, including windshear and aircraft icing, in the private operator’s area of operation;

    • (i) the private operator’s navigation and instrument approach procedures;

    • (j) accident and incident reporting;

    • (k) emergency procedures;

    • (l) weight and balance control procedures;

    • (m) pre-flight crew member briefings;

    • (n) the differences between pilot self-dispatch procedures and co-authority dispatch procedures;

    • (o) the provision of meteorological information to the flight crew without analysis or interpretation;

    • (p) foreign regulations, if applicable;

    • (q) aeronautical information publications applicable to the private operator’s area of operation;

    • (r) meteorological conditions and their effect on the flight and operation of an aircraft;

    • (s) the interpretation of meteorological information;

    • (t) the performance and limitations of the private operator’s aircraft;

    • (u) air traffic control procedures; and

    • (v) flight dispatch procedures.

  • (2) The component of the training program for flight followers shall include the elements referred to in paragraphs (1)(a) to (q).

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Ground and Airborne Icing Operations

 The component of the training program for flight crew members and ground personnel that relates to ground and airborne icing operations shall include the following elements:

  • (a) the responsibilities of the pilot-in-command and other operations personnel in respect of aircraft de-icing and anti-icing procedures;

  • (b) the provisions of these Regulations, and of related standards, that relate to ground and airborne icing operations;

  • (c) the meteorological conditions that are conducive to ice, frost and snow contamination;

  • (d) procedures relating to pre-flight inspections and to the removal of contamination;

  • (e) the hazards associated with the contamination of critical surfaces by ice, frost and snow;

  • (f) airborne icing recognition; and

  • (g) in the case of training provided to flight crew members,

    • (i) the basis of the certification of the aircraft for flight into known icing conditions,

    • (ii) airborne icing definitions and terminology,

    • (iii) the aerodynamic effects of airborne icing,

    • (iv) the weather patterns associated with airborne icing, including both classical and non-classical mechanisms that produce freezing precipitation,

    • (v) flight planning and airborne icing information,

    • (vi) information specific to the private operator’s aircraft fleet that relates to the operation of de-icing and anti-icing equipment, and operational procedures relating to that equipment, and

    • (vii) the private operator’s directives concerning operations in airborne icing conditions set out in the private operator’s operations manual and, if established by the private operator, in the private operator’s standard operating procedures.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
Maintenance, Elementary Work and Servicing
  •  (1) The component of the training program for persons who performs maintenance or elementary work shall include the following elements:

    • (a) the performance rules set out in section 571.02, and the recording requirements set out in section 571.03 and subsection 605.92(1); and

    • (b) the private operator’s maintenance control system.

  • (2) The component of the training program for persons who perform servicing shall include the following elements:

    • (a) the procedures that are set out in instructions for continued airworthiness provided by the holder of the design approval document, and that are applicable to the types of aircraft operated by the private operator; and

    • (b) details of the methods used by the private operator to record servicing under paragraph 604.127(k).

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18
 
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