Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2017-09-27 and last amended on 2017-09-15. Previous Versions

Take-off Minima

 For the purposes of paragraph 602.126(1)(b),

  • (a) a pilot-in-command may conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by a private operator when the reported RVR is at least 1,200 feet or the reported ground visibility is at least one quarter of a statute mile if

    • (i) the private operator is authorized to do so under a special authorization,

    • (ii) the aircraft is operated by at least two flight crew members,

    • (iii) the flight plan filed for the flight specifies a take-off alternate aerodrome that

      • (A) in the case of a twin-engined aircraft, is within the distance that can be flown in 60 minutes at normal cruising speed, or

      • (B) in the case of an aircraft with three or more engines, is within the distance that can be flown in 120 minutes at normal cruising speed,

    • (iv) the pilot-in-command and, if the operations manual provides that the second-in-command may conduct the take-off, the second-in-command have received the following training for which the validity period has not expired:

      • (A) take-off alternate aerodrome requirements,

      • (B) pilot-in-command experience requirements,

      • (C) pilot-in-command responsibility for visibility and obstacle clearance requirements, and

      • (D) minimum aircraft and runway equipment requirements,

    • (v) the pilot-in-command

      • (A) identifies any obstructions that may be in the take-off path,

      • (B) determines — using the aircraft performance data and limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual — that the aircraft is, with the critical engine inoperative, able to

        • (I) safely clear those obstructions, and

        • (II) maintain at least the minimum enroute altitude to the take-off alternate aerodrome, and

      • (C) verifies that the RVR is at least 1,200 feet or the ground visibility is at least one quarter of a statute mile,

    • (vi) the runway is equipped with high-intensity runway lights, or runway centre line lights, that are serviceable and functioning and that are visible to the pilot throughout the take-off run, or with runway centre line markings that are visible to the pilot throughout the take-off run,

    • (vii) the pilot-in-command and second-in-command attitude indicators provide a clear depiction of total aircraft attitude that includes the incorporation of pitch attitude index lines in appropriate increments up to 15° above and 15° below the reference line,

    • (viii) failure warning systems to immediately detect failures and malfunctions in attitude indicators, directional gyros and horizontal situation indicators are operative, and

    • (ix) the pilot-in-command and, if the operations manual provides that the second-in-command may conduct the take-off, the second-in-command have demonstrated to the private operator the ability to operate the aircraft in accordance with this paragraph; and

  • (b) a pilot-in-command may conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by a private operator when the reported RVR is at least 600 feet if

    • (i) the private operator is authorized to do so under a special authorization,

    • (ii) the aircraft is operated by at least two flight crew members,

    • (iii) the flight plan filed for the flight specifies a take-off alternate aerodrome that

      • (A) in the case of a twin-engined aircraft, is within the distance that can be flown in 60 minutes at normal cruising speed, or

      • (B) in the case of an aircraft with three or more engines, is within the distance that can be flown in 120 minutes at normal cruising speed,

    • (iv) the pilot-in-command and, if the operations manual provides that the second-in-command may conduct the take-off, the second-in-command have received the following training for which the validity period has not expired:

      • (A) ground training in

        • (I) take-off alternate aerodrome requirements,

        • (II) pilot-in-command experience requirements,

        • (III) pilot-in-command responsibility for visibility and obstacle clearance requirements, and

        • (IV) minimum aircraft and runway equipment requirements, and

      • (B) level C or D flight simulator training that includes

        • (I) one completed take-off at an RVR of 600 feet, and

        • (II) one rejected take-off, at an RVR of 600 feet, that includes an engine failure,

    • (v) the pilot-in-command

      • (A) identifies any obstructions that may be in the take-off path,

      • (B) determines — using the aircraft performance data and limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual — that the aircraft is, with the critical engine inoperative, able to

        • (I) safely clear those obstructions, and

        • (II) maintain at least the minimum enroute altitude to the take-off alternate aerodrome, and

      • (C) verifies that the RVR is at least 600 feet,

    • (vi) the runway is equipped

      • (A) with high-intensity runway lights, and runway centre line lights, that are serviceable and functioning and that are visible to the pilot throughout the take-off run, and with runway centre line markings that are visible to the pilot throughout the take-off run, and

      • (B) with two RVR sensors that each show an RVR of at least 600 feet, one sensor being situated at the approach end of the runway and the other at

        • (I) the mid-point of the runway, or

        • (II) the departure end of the runway, if the runway is equipped with three RVR sensors and the sensor situated at the mid-point is not serviceable,

    • (vii) the pilot-in-command and second-in-command attitude indicators provide a clear depiction of total aircraft attitude that includes the incorporation of pitch attitude index lines in appropriate increments up to 15° above and 15° below the reference line,

    • (viii) failure warning systems to immediately detect failures and malfunctions in attitude indicators, directional gyros and horizontal situation indicators are operative, and

    • (ix) the pilot-in-command and, if the operations manual provides that the second-in-command may conduct the take-off, the second-in-command have demonstrated to the private operator the ability to operate the aircraft in accordance with this paragraph.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

Instrument Procedures — GNSS

 No person shall conduct an instrument procedure using a GNSS receiver in an aircraft operated by a private operator unless

  • (a) the private operator is authorized to do so under a special authorization;

  • (b) every flight crew member has received the following training for which the validity period has not expired:

    • (i) ground training in

      • (A) the GNSS and its theory of operation,

      • (B) the operation of the model of GNSS receiver that will be used, and

      • (C) the actions to be taken in response to GNSS receiver warnings and messages, and

    • (ii) in-flight training

      • (A) in the operation of the model of GNSS receiver that will be used,

      • (B) in the actions to be taken in response to GNSS receiver warnings and messages,

      • (C) in the use of the GNSS receiver for instrument procedures and other associated duties for each crew position that the flight crew member will occupy,

      • (D) provided

        • (I) on board an aircraft, or

        • (II) using a Level C or D flight simulator equipped with the same model of GNSS receiver as is installed in the private operator’s aircraft or with a model with a user interface comparable to the user interface of that GNSS receiver, and

      • (E) provided by a pilot who has received training on the same model of GNSS receiver as is installed in the private operator’s aircraft or on a model with a user interface comparable to the user interface of that GNSS receiver;

  • (c) every flight crew member has demonstrated to the private operator the ability to conduct an instrument approach using a GNSS receiver in accordance with this section;

  • (d) the coverage area of the GNSS receiver database is compatible with the area of operation in which the aircraft will be operated;

  • (e) the private operator has established procedures to ensure that

    • (i) the GNSS receiver database is updated so that it remains current,

    • (ii) flight crew members who identify GNSS receiver database errors communicate those errors to the private operator, and

    • (iii) the GNSS receiver database errors identified are communicated to the private operator’s other personnel and to the GNSS receiver database provider;

  • (f) if the aircraft is designed to be operated by one flight crew member, the GNSS course deviation and distance displays are located at the pilot station normally occupied by the pilot-in-command and within the primary field of vision of the flight crew member who occupies the pilot station;

  • (g) if the aircraft is designed to be operated by two flight crew members, the GNSS course deviation and distance displays are located at each pilot station and within the primary field of vision of the flight crew member who occupies the pilot station;

  • (h) if the aircraft is designed to be operated by one flight crew member, but can be operated by two flight crew members,

    • (i) the control display unit that is linked to the GNSS receiver is centrally located in relation to the two pilot stations and provides navigation information that is visible to the pilot not flying, or

    • (ii) the GNSS course deviation and distance displays are located at each pilot station and within the primary field of vision of the flight crew members who occupy those pilot stations; and

  • (i) the private operator has established GNSS approach procedures in order to prevent confusion between GNSS distance information and distance measuring equipment (DME) information.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.
 
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