Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2017-11-20 and last amended on 2017-09-15. Previous Versions

Survival Equipment — Flights over Land

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall operate an aircraft over land unless there is carried on board survival equipment, sufficient for the survival on the ground of each person on board, given the geographical area, the season of the year and anticipated seasonal climatic variations, that provides the means for

    • (a) starting a fire;

    • (b) providing shelter;

    • (c) providing or purifying water; and

    • (d) visually signalling distress.

  • (2) Subsection (1) does not apply in respect of

    • (a) a balloon, a glider, a hang glider, a gyroplane or an ultra-light aeroplane;

    • (b) an aircraft that is operated within 25 nautical miles of the aerodrome of departure and that has the capability of radiocommunication with a surface-based radio station for the duration of the flight;

    • (c) a multi-engined aircraft that is operated south of 66° 30’ north latitude

      • (i) in IFR flight within controlled airspace, or

      • (ii) along designated air routes;

    • (d) an aircraft that is operated by an air operator, where the aircraft is equipped with equipment specified in the air operator’s company operations manual, but not with the equipment required by subsection (1); or

    • (e) an aircraft that is operated in a geographical area where and at a time of year when the survival of the persons on board is not jeopardized.

Life Preservers and Flotation Devices

  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off or a landing on water in an aircraft or operate an aircraft over water beyond a point where the aircraft could reach shore in the event of an engine failure, unless a life preserver, individual flotation device or personal flotation device is carried for each person on board.

  • (2) No person shall operate a land aeroplane, gyroplane, helicopter or airship at more than 50 nautical miles from shore unless a life preserver is carried for each person on board.

  • (3) No person shall operate a balloon at more than two nautical miles from shore unless a life preserver, individual flotation device or personal flotation device is carried for each person on board.

  • (4) For aircraft other than balloons, every life preserver, individual flotation device and personal flotation device referred to in this section shall be stowed in a position that is easily accessible to the person for whose use it is provided, when that person is seated.

Life Rafts and Survival Equipment — Flights over Water

  •  (1) No person shall operate over water a single-engined aeroplane, or a multi-engined aeroplane that is unable to maintain flight with any engine failed, at more than 100 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 30 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (2) Subject to subsection (3), no person shall operate over water a multi-engined aeroplane that is able to maintain flight with any engine failed at more than 200 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 60 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (3) A person may operate over water a transport category aircraft that is an aeroplane, at up to 400 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 120 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site without the life rafts referred to in subsection (2) being carried on board.

  • (4) No person shall operate over water a single-engined helicopter, or a multi-engined helicopter that is unable to maintain flight with any engine failed, at more than 25 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 15 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (5) No person shall operate over water a multi-engined helicopter that is able to maintain flight with any engine failed at more than 50 nautical miles, or the distance that can be covered in 30 minutes of flight at the cruising speed filed in the flight plan or flight itinerary, whichever distance is the lesser, from a suitable emergency landing site unless life rafts are carried on board and are sufficient in total rated capacity to accommodate all of the persons on board.

  • (6) The life rafts referred to in this section shall be

    • (a) stowed so that they are easily accessible for use in the event of a ditching;

    • (b) installed in conspicuously marked locations near an exit; and

    • (c) equipped with an attached survival kit, sufficient for the survival on water of each person on board the aircraft, given the geographical area, the season of the year and anticipated seasonal climatic variations, that provides a means for

      • (i) providing shelter,

      • (ii) providing or purifying water, and

      • (iii) visually signalling distress.

  • (7) Where a helicopter is required to carry life rafts pursuant to subsection (4) or (5), no person shall operate the helicopter over water having a temperature of less than 10oC unless

    • (a) a helicopter passenger transportation suit system that conforms to paragraph 551.407(c) of the Airworthiness Manual is provided for each passenger on board;

    • (b) a helicopter crew member transportation suit system is provided for each crew member on board; and

    • (c) the pilot-in-command directs all persons on board to wear their helicopter transportation suit system.

  • (8) Every person who has been directed to wear a helicopter transportation suit system pursuant to paragraph (7)(c) shall wear that suit system.

  • SOR/2015-84, s. 3.

Offshore Operations Flight

  •  (1) Subject to section 602.65, no person shall dispatch or conduct a take-off in a helicopter to conduct an offshore operations flight if, during the pre-flight check required under section 602.71 or the weather check required under section 602.72, the pilot-in-command or the air operator is aware that the sea state at any point along the planned route exceeds the sea state for which the helicopter is certified, as part of its type design, to conduct a ditching.

  • (2) An air operator who uses a helicopter to conduct an offshore operations flight shall notify the pilot-in-command if, at take-off or during the flight, the air operator is or becomes aware that the sea state at any point along the planned route between the position of the helicopter and the destination exceeds the sea state for which the helicopter is certified, as part of its type design, to conduct a ditching.

  • (3) If the pilot-in-command of a helicopter who is conducting an offshore operations flight is or becomes aware that the sea state at any point along the planned route between the position of the helicopter and the destination exceeds the sea state for which the helicopter is certified, as part of its type design, to conduct a ditching, the pilot-in-command shall, subject to section 602.65, proceed directly to a land base.

  • SOR/2015-84, s. 4.

Emergency Exception

 Subsections 602.64(1) and (3) do not apply in respect of an offshore operations flight conducted for the purpose of responding to an emergency.

  • SOR/2015-84, s. 4.

Emergency Underwater Breathing Apparatus (EUBA)

  •  (1) No person shall operate a helicopter to conduct an offshore operations flight over Canadian waters unless

    • (a) a EUBA is provided for each person on board;

    • (b) each EUBA

      • (i) is readily accessible for immediate use in the event of a ditching,

      • (ii) can be donned quickly,

      • (iii) provides a supplemental air supply that is effective to a depth of at least 3.6 m, and

      • (iv) is not likely to pose a snagging risk during an evacuation of the helicopter; and

    • (c) each person on board has, in the 36-month period preceding the flight, received EUBA training that

      • (i) is specific to the type of EUBA provided,

      • (ii) includes classroom theory training on the use of the EUBA and its limits and hazards, and

      • (iii) includes practical pool training that simulates the evacuation of a helicopter that has overturned or is sinking after a ditching.

  • (2) No person shall operate a helicopter to conduct an offshore operations flight over Canadian waters that have a temperature of 10°C or more unless the EUBA that is provided for a person under subsection (1) is attached to the life preserver, individual flotation device or personal flotation device that is carried on board the helicopter for that person.

  • (3) No person shall operate a helicopter to conduct an offshore operations flight over Canadian waters that have a temperature of less than 10°C unless the EUBA that is provided for a person under subsection (1)

    • (a) is in a pocket or pouch that is part of the person’s helicopter passenger transportation suit system or helicopter crew member transportation suit system;

    • (b) is in a pouch that is worn with the person’s helicopter passenger transportation suit system or helicopter crew member transportation suit system; or

    • (c) is attached to the person’s helicopter passenger transportation suit system or helicopter crew member transportation suit system.

  • SOR/2015-84, s. 4.
 
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