Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2016-05-12 and last amended on 2015-08-31. Previous Versions

[602.80 to 602.85 reserved]

Division IV — Pre-Flight and Fuel Requirements

Carry-on Baggage, Equipment and Cargo

  •  (1) No person shall operate an aircraft with carry-on baggage, equipment or cargo on board, unless the carry-on baggage, equipment and cargo are

    • (a) stowed in a bin, compartment, rack or other location that is certified in accordance with the aircraft type certificate in respect of the stowage of carry-on baggage, equipment or cargo; or

    • (b) restrained so as to prevent them from shifting during movement of the aircraft on the surface and during take-off, landing and in-flight turbulence.

  • (2) No person shall operate an aircraft with carry-on baggage, equipment or cargo on board unless

    • (a) the safety equipment, the normal and emergency exits that are accessible to passengers and the aisles between the flight deck and a passenger compartment are not wholly or partially blocked by carry-on baggage, equipment or cargo;

    • (b) all of the equipment and cargo that are stowed in a passenger compartment are packaged or covered to avoid possible injury to persons on board;

    • (c) where the aircraft is type-certificated to carry 10 or more passengers and passengers are carried on board,

      • (i) no passenger’s view of any “seat belt” sign, “no smoking” sign or exit sign is obscured by carry-on baggage, equipment or cargo except if an auxiliary sign is visible to the passenger or another means of notification of the passenger is available,

      • (ii) all of the passenger service carts and trolleys are securely restrained during movement of the aircraft on the surface, take-off and landing, and during in-flight turbulence where the pilot-in-command or in-charge flight attendant has directed that the cabin be secured pursuant to subsection 605.25(3) or (4), and

      • (iii) all of the video monitors that are suspended from the ceiling of the aircraft and extend into an aisle are stowed and securely restrained during take-off and landing; and

    • (d) all of the cargo that is stowed in a compartment to which crew members have access is stowed in such a manner as to allow a crew member to effectively reach all parts of the compartment with a hand-held fire extinguisher.

  • SOR/2002-353, s. 1(F).

Crew Member Instructions

 The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that each crew member, before acting as a crew member on board the aircraft, has been instructed with respect to

  • (a) the duties that the crew member is to perform; and

  • (b) the location and use of all of the normal and emergency exits and of all of the emergency equipment that is carried on board the aircraft.

Fuel Requirements

  •  (1) This section does not apply in respect of any glider, balloon or ultra-light aeroplane.

  • (2) No pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall commence a flight or, during flight, change the destination aerodrome set out in the flight plan or flight itinerary, unless the aircraft carries sufficient fuel to ensure compliance with subsections (3) to (5).

  • (3) An aircraft operated in VFR flight shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to allow the aircraft

    • (a) in the case of an aircraft other than a helicopter,

      • (i) when operated during the day, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 30 minutes at normal cruising speed, or

      • (ii) when operated at night, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 45 minutes at normal cruising speed; or

    • (b) in the case of a helicopter, to fly to the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 20 minutes at normal cruising speed.

  • (4) An aircraft operated in IFR flight shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to allow the aircraft

    • (a) in the case of a propeller-driven aeroplane,

      • (i) where an alternate aerodrome is specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome, to fly to and land at the alternate aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 45 minutes, or

      • (ii) where an alternate aerodrome is not specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 45 minutes; or

    • (b) in the case of a turbo-jet-powered aeroplane or a helicopter,

      • (i) where an alternate aerodrome is specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome, to fly to and land at the alternate aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 30 minutes, or

      • (ii) where an alternate aerodrome is not specified in the flight plan or flight itinerary, to fly to and execute an approach and a missed approach at the destination aerodrome and then to fly for a period of 30 minutes.

  • (5) Every aircraft shall carry an amount of fuel that is sufficient to provide for

    • (a) taxiing and foreseeable delays prior to take-off;

    • (b) meteorological conditions;

    • (c) foreseeable air traffic routings and traffic delays;

    • (d) landing at a suitable aerodrome in the event of loss of cabin pressurization or, in the case of a multi-engined aircraft, failure of any engine, at the most critical point during the flight; and

    • (e) any other foreseeable conditions that could delay the landing of the aircraft.

Passenger Briefings

  •  (1) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that all of the passengers on board the aircraft are briefed before take-off with respect to the following, where applicable:

    • (a) the location and means of operation of emergency and normal exits;

    • (b) the location and means of operation of safety belts, shoulder harnesses and restraint devices;

    • (c) the positioning of seats and the securing of seat backs and chair tables;

    • (d) the stowage of carry-on baggage;

    • (e) where the aircraft is unpressurized and it is possible that the flight will require the use of oxygen by the passengers, the location and means of operation of oxygen equipment; and

    • (f) any prohibition against smoking.

  • (2) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall ensure that all of the passengers on board the aircraft are briefed

    • (a) in the case of an over-water flight where the carriage of life preservers, individual flotation devices or personal flotation devices is required pursuant to section 602.62, before commencement of the over-water portion of the flight, with respect to the location and use of those items; and

    • (b) in the case of a pressurized aircraft that is to be operated at an altitude above FL 250, before the aircraft reaches FL 250, with respect to the location and means of operation of oxygen equipment.

  • (3) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft shall, before take-off, ensure that all of the passengers on board the aircraft are provided with information respecting the location and use of

    • (a) first aid kits and survival equipment;

    • (b) where the aircraft is a helicopter or a small aircraft that is an aeroplane, any ELT that is required to be carried on board pursuant to section 605.38; and

    • (c) any life raft that is required to be carried on board pursuant to section 602.63.

[602.90 to 602.95 reserved]

Division V — Operations at or in the Vicinity of an Aerodrome

General

  •  (1) This section applies to persons operating VFR or IFR aircraft at or in the vicinity of an uncontrolled or controlled aerodrome.

  • (2) Before taking off from, landing at or otherwise operating an aircraft at an aerodrome, the pilot-in-command of the aircraft shall be satisfied that

    • (a) there is no likelihood of collision with another aircraft or a vehicle; and

    • (b) the aerodrome is suitable for the intended operation.

  • (3) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft operating at or in the vicinity of an aerodrome shall

    • (a) observe aerodrome traffic for the purpose of avoiding a collision;

    • (b) conform to or avoid the pattern of traffic formed by other aircraft in operation;

    • (c) make all turns to the left when operating within the aerodrome traffic circuit, except where right turns are specified by the Minister in the Canada Flight Supplement or where otherwise authorized by the appropriate air traffic control unit;

    • (d) where the aerodrome is an airport, comply with any airport operating restrictions specified by the Minister in the Canada Flight Supplement;

    • (e) where practicable, land and take off into the wind unless otherwise authorized by the appropriate air traffic control unit;

    • (f) maintain a continuous listening watch on the appropriate frequency for aerodrome control communications or, if this is not possible and an air traffic control unit is in operation at the aerodrome, keep a watch for such instructions as may be issued by visual means by the air traffic control unit; and

    • (g) where the aerodrome is a controlled aerodrome, obtain from the appropriate air traffic control unit, either by radio communication or by visual signal, clearance to taxi, take off from or land at the aerodrome.

  • (4) Unless otherwise authorized by the appropriate air traffic control unit, no pilot-in-command shall operate an aircraft at an altitude of less than 2,000 feet over an aerodrome except for the purpose of landing or taking off or if the aircraft is operated pursuant to subsection (5).

  • (5) Where it is necessary for the purposes of the operation in which the aircraft is engaged, a pilot-in-command may operate an aircraft at an altitude of less than 2,000 feet over an aerodrome, where it is being operated

    • (a) in the service of a police authority;

    • (b) for the purpose of saving human life;

    • (c) for fire-fighting or air ambulance operations;

    • (d) for the purpose of the administration of the Fisheries Act or the Coastal Fisheries Protection Act;

    • (e) for the purpose of the administration of the national or provincial parks;

    • (f) for the purpose of flight inspection;

    • (g) for the purpose of aerial application or aerial inspection;

    • (h) for the purpose of highway or city traffic patrol;

    • (i) for the purpose of aerial photography conducted by the holder of an air operator certificate;

    • (j) for the purpose of helicopter external load operations; or

    • (k) for the purpose of flight training conducted by the holder of a flight training unit operator certificate.

  • (6) No person shall conduct a take-off or landing at a designated airport without an aircraft fire-fighting service in an aeroplane in respect of which a type certificate has been issued authorizing the transport of 20 or more passengers if the aeroplane is operated under

    • (a) Part VI, Subpart 4; or

    • (b) Part VII, Subpart 1 or 5.

  • (7) Subsection (6) does not apply in respect of

    • (a) a cargo flight without passengers;

    • (b) a ferry flight;

    • (c) a positioning flight;

    • (d) a training flight if no fare-paying passengers are on board;

    • (e) the arrival of an aeroplane when the airport is being used for a diversion or as an alternate aerodrome; or

    • (f) the subsequent departure of an aeroplane referred to in paragraph (e) if

      • (i) the air operator or private operator has notified the operator of the designated airport of the intended time of departure,

      • (ii) the operator of the designated airport has advised the air operator or private operator that aircraft fire-fighting services cannot be made available within one hour after the later of the time that notification was given under subparagraph (i) and the time of landing, and

      • (iii) the pilot-in-command and the operations manager of the air operator or private operator have agreed that the aeroplane will depart without aircraft fire-fighting services being available.

  • SOR/2003-59, s. 1.
 
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