Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2017-09-27 and last amended on 2017-09-15. Previous Versions

Time with no Assigned Duties

 No private operator shall assign duties to a flight crew member, and no flight crew member shall accept those duties, unless the private operator provides the flight crew member with one of the following periods with no assigned duties:

  • (a) at least 36 consecutive hours in a period of seven consecutive days; or

  • (b) at least three consecutive calendar days in a period of 17 consecutive days.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

Rest Period — Flight Crew Member Positioning

 If a flight crew member is required by a private operator to travel for the purpose of positioning after the completion of flight duty time, the private operator shall provide the flight crew member with an additional rest period that is at least equal to one half of the time spent for that purpose that is in excess of the flight duty time referred to in paragraphs 604.99(1)(a) and (b).

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

Controlled Rest on the Flight Deck

  •  (1) No private operator shall allow a flight crew member to take a controlled rest on the flight deck of an aircraft operated by the private operator unless

    • (a) the private operator has a controlled-rest-on-the-flight-deck program that includes the following elements:

      • (i) guidelines on the use of controlled rest, including the factors allowing or preventing its use,

      • (ii) the general principles relating to fatigue and fatigue countermeasures, and

      • (iii) the procedures to be followed by participating crew members before, during and after a controlled rest; and

    • (b) every participating crew member has received training relating to the elements of the controlled-rest-on-the-flight-deck program.

  • (2) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft operated by a private operator shall determine whether the flight conditions, the duration of the flight and the physiological condition of the crew members allow a controlled rest on the flight deck to be taken by a flight crew member.

  • (3) The pilot-in-command of an aircraft operated by a private operator shall give participating crew members a briefing that includes the following elements:

    • (a) the order in which the periods of controlled rest are to be taken by the flight crew members;

    • (b) the planned duration of each period of controlled rest;

    • (c) the circumstances under which a resting flight crew member is to be woken;

    • (d) the procedures for the transfer of flight controls and duties; and

    • (e) flight attendant duties in relation to a controlled rest.

  • (4) The flight crew members on board an aircraft operated by a private operator shall

    • (a) prior to each controlled rest on the flight deck,

      • (i) participate in an operational briefing,

      • (ii) carry out the transfer of duties, and

      • (iii) inform the flight attendants of the controlled rest; and

    • (b) remain on the flight deck during the controlled rest.

  • (5) The flight crew member who supervises a controlled rest on the flight deck of an aircraft operated by a private operator shall, during the controlled rest,

    • (a) perform the duties of the resting flight crew member;

    • (b) ensure that the controlled rest is taken only during the cruise portion of the flight and is completed at least 30 minutes before top of descent;

    • (c) ensure that the period of controlled rest is of no more than 45 minutes in duration;

    • (d) ensure that the resting flight crew member is awake for at least 15 minutes before the resumption of duties, except in abnormal or emergency conditions; and

    • (e) after the completion of the controlled rest, give an operational briefing to the flight crew member who has taken the controlled rest.

  • (6) For the purposes of this section, participating crew member means the resting flight crew member and the flight crew member who supervises the controlled rest on the flight deck.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

[604.107 to 604.115 reserved]

Division VII — Emergency Equipment

Survival Equipment

  •  (1) No person shall operate over land an aircraft operated by a private operator, other than an aircraft referred to in subsection 602.61(2), unless a survival manual is carried on board that contains information about how to survive on the ground and how to use the survival equipment that is carried on board to meet the requirements of subsection 602.61(1).

  • (2) No person shall operate over water an aircraft operated by a private operator unless a survival kit is carried on board that, in addition to meeting the requirement of paragraph 602.63(6)(c), contains

    • (a) a radar reflector;

    • (b) a life raft repair kit;

    • (c) a bailing bucket and a sponge;

    • (d) a whistle;

    • (e) a waterproof flashlight;

    • (f) a two-day supply of potable water — based on 500 millilitres per person per day and calculated using the overload capacity of the life raft — or a means of desalting or distilling salt water that can provide 500 millilitres of potable water per person per day;

    • (g) a waterproof survival manual that contains information about how to survive at sea;

    • (h) a first aid kit that contains antiseptic swabs, burn dressing compresses, bandages and motion sickness pills; and

    • (i) a pyrotechnic signalling device, or an aviation visual distress signal that has a marking, applied by the manufacturer, indicating that the signal meets the requirements of CAN‑TSO-C168, a signalling mirror and a dye marker for visually signalling distress.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

First Aid Kits

  •  (1) Despite paragraph 602.60(1)(h), no person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by a private operator that is configured as follows unless the corresponding number of first aid kits is carried on board, and each kit contains the supplies and equipment set out in the Aviation Occupational Health and Safety Regulations:

    • (a) on board an aircraft configured for 1 to 50 passenger seats, one kit;

    • (b) on board an aircraft configured for 51 to 150 passenger seats, two kits;

    • (c) on board an aircraft configured for 151 to 250 passenger seats, three kits; and

    • (d) on board an aircraft configured for 251 or more passenger seats, four kits.

  • (2) No person shall conduct a take-off in an aircraft operated by a private operator unless

    • (a) the first aid kits referred to in subsection (1) are distributed throughout the cabin and are readily available to crew members and passengers;

    • (b) each first aid kit is clearly identified; and

    • (c) if a first aid kit is stowed in a bin or compartment, the bin or compartment is clearly marked as containing a first aid kit.

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.

Protective Breathing Equipment

  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a pressurized aircraft operated by a private operator that has flight attendants on board unless one unit of protective breathing equipment with a 15-minute portable supply of breathing gas at a pressure-altitude of 8,000 feet is available

    • (a) at the entry into each Class A, B, E and F cargo compartment accessible to crew members during flight;

    • (b) at the site of each hand-held fire extinguisher that is located in an isolated galley;

    • (c) on the flight deck; and

    • (d) at the site of each hand-held fire extinguisher that is required under section 604.119.

  • (2) If the breathing gas in the protective breathing equipment referred to in subsection (1) is oxygen, each unit of that equipment reduces by 15 minutes the crew member oxygen requirements specified in subsection 605.31(2).

  • SOR/2014-131, s. 18.
 
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