Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2014-04-02 and last amended on 2012-07-04. Previous Versions

Warning Notices

 Where low-flying or taxiing aircraft at or in the vicinity of an aerodrome are likely to be hazardous to pedestrian or vehicular traffic, the operator of the aerodrome shall immediately

  • (a) post notices warning of the hazard on any public way that is adjacent to the manoeuvring area; or

  • (b) where such a public way is not owned or controlled by the operator, inform the authorities responsible for placing markings on the public way that there is a hazard.

Wind Direction Indicator

  •  (1) Except where the direction of the wind at an aerodrome can be determined by radio or other means such as smoke movement in the air or wind lines on water, the operator of the aerodrome shall install and maintain at the aerodrome a wind direction indicator that is

    • (a) of a conspicuous colour or colours;

    • (b) in the shape of a truncated cone;

    • (c) visible from an aircraft flying at an altitude of 300 m (1,000 feet) above the wind direction indicator; and

    • (d) illuminated when the aerodrome is used at night.

  • (2) When an aerodrome is closed permanently, the operator of the aerodrome shall immediately remove all of the wind direction indicators installed at the aerodrome.

Lighting

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), where a runway is used at night, the operator of the aerodrome shall indicate each side of the runway along its length with a line of fixed white lights that is visible in all directions from an aircraft in flight at a distance of not less than two nautical miles.

  • (2) Where it is not practical to provide at an aerodrome the fixed white lights referred to in subsection (1) for reasons such as the lack of an available electrical power source or insufficient air traffic, the operator of the aerodrome may, if a fixed white light is displayed at each end of the runway to indicate runway alignment, use white retro-reflective markers that are capable of reflecting aircraft lights and that are visible at a distance of not less than two nautical miles from an aircraft in flight that is aligned with the centre line of the runway.

  • (3) The lines of lights or retro-reflective markers required by subsection (1) or (2) shall be arranged so that

    • (a) the lines of lights or markers are parallel and of equal length and the transverse distance between the lines is equal to the runway width in use during the day;

    • (b) the distance between adjacent lights or markers in each line is the same and is not more than 60 m (200 feet);

    • (c) each line of lights or markers is not less than 420 m (1,377 feet) in length and contains no fewer than eight lights or markers; and

    • (d) each light or marker in a line of lights or markers is situated opposite to a light or marker in the line of lights or markers on the other side of the runway, so that a line connecting them forms a right angle to the centre line of the runway.

  • (4) Fixed white lights displayed at each end of a runway pursuant to subsection (2) shall be placed so that they are not likely to cause a hazard that could endanger persons or property.

  • (5) Where a taxiway is used at night, the operator of the aerodrome shall indicate each side of the taxiway with a line of fixed blue lights or blue retro-reflective markers placed so that the two lines of lights or markers are parallel and the distance between adjacent lights or markers in each line is not more than 60 m (200 feet).

  • (6) Where a manoeuvring area or part thereof or a heliport is closed, the operator of the aerodrome shall not operate the lights or keep the retro-reflective markers thereon, except as required for maintenance of the lights and markers.

  • (7) Where an aerodrome is used at night, the operator of the aerodrome shall indicate an unserviceable portion of the movement area with fixed red lights, red retro-reflective markers or floodlighting.

  • (8) Where an aircraft parking area at an aerodrome is used at night, the operator of the aerodrome shall indicate the boundary of the area with fixed blue lights or blue retro-reflective markers, placed at intervals not exceeding 60 m (200 feet), or with floodlighting.

  • (9) Subject to subsection (10), where a heliport is used at night for the take-off or landing of helicopters, the operator of the heliport shall illuminate the entire take-off and landing area with floodlights or

    • (a) where the take-off and landing area is rectangular, shall indicate the boundary with no fewer than eight fixed yellow lights, including one light at each corner, placed so that adjacent lights are not more than 13 m (42.5 feet) apart; or

    • (b) where the take-off and landing area is circular, shall indicate the boundary with no fewer than five fixed yellow lights placed so that adjacent lights are not more than 13 m (42.5 feet) apart.

  • (10) Where it is not practical to provide at a heliport the fixed yellow lights referred to in subsection (9) for reasons such as lack of an available electrical power source or insufficient air traffic, the operator of the heliport may use yellow retro-reflective markers that are capable of reflecting aircraft lights and that are visible at a distance of not less than two nautical miles from an aircraft in flight that is aligned with the approach path, if

    • (a) a light source is provided to show the location of the heliport; or

    • (b) where there is only one path for approach and departure, two lights are used to show the approach orientation.

  • (11) Where the lighting required by subsections (1), (2), (5) and (7) to (10) is operated by a radio-controlled system capable of activation from an aircraft, the system shall meet the requirements set out in Schedule II to this Subpart.

  • (12) The operator of an aerodrome may display flare pots to provide temporary lighting for the landing or take-off of aircraft.