Canadian Aviation Regulations (SOR/96-433)

Regulations are current to 2017-09-27 and last amended on 2017-09-15. Previous Versions

Altimeter-setting and Operating Procedures in the Standard Pressure Region

  •  (1) When an aircraft is operated in the standard pressure region, each flight crew member who occupies a flight crew member position that is equipped with an altimeter shall

    • (a) immediately before conducting a take-off from an aerodrome, set the altimeter to the altimeter setting of the aerodrome or, if that altimeter setting is not obtainable, to the elevation of the aerodrome;

    • (b) before reaching the flight level at which the flight is to be conducted, set the altimeter to 29.92 inches of mercury or 1,013.2 millibars; and

    • (c) immediately before commencing a descent for the purpose of landing at an aerodrome, set the altimeter to the altimeter setting of the aerodrome, if that altimeter setting is obtainable.

  • (2) Notwithstanding paragraph (1)(c), when a holding procedure is being conducted before landing at an aerodrome located in the standard pressure region, each flight crew member who occupies a flight crew member position that is equipped with an altimeter shall set the altimeter to the altimeter setting of the aerodrome immediately before descending below the lowest flight level at which the holding procedure is conducted.

Altimeter-setting and Operating Procedures in Transition between Regions

 Except where otherwise authorized by an air traffic control unit, each flight crew member who occupies a flight crew member position that is equipped with an altimeter shall

  • (a) when flying from the altimeter-setting region into the standard pressure region, set the altimeter to 29.92 inches of mercury or 1,013.2 millibars immediately after the aircraft’s entry into the standard pressure region; and

  • (b) when flying from the standard pressure region into the altimeter-setting region, set the altimeter to the altimeter setting of the nearest station along the route of flight or, where the nearest stations along the route of flight are separated by more than 150 nautical miles, the altimeter setting of a station near the route of flight immediately before the aircraft’s entry into the altimeter-setting region.

Flight over the High Seas

 The pilot-in-command of a Canadian aircraft that is in flight over the high seas shall comply with the applicable Rules of the Air set out in Annex 2 to the Convention and the applicable Regional Supplementary Procedures set out in Document 7030/4 of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

Transoceanic Flight

 No pilot-in-command of a single-engined aircraft, or of a multi-engined aircraft that would be unable to maintain flight in the event of the failure of any engine, shall commence a flight that will leave Canadian Domestic Airspace and enter airspace over the high seas unless

  • (a) the pilot-in-command holds a pilot licence endorsed with an instrument rating;

  • (b) the aircraft is equipped with

    • (i) the equipment referred to in section 605.18,

    • (ii) a high frequency radio capable of transmitting and receiving on a minimum of two appropriate international air-ground general purpose frequencies, and

    • (iii) hypothermia protection for each person on board; and

  • (c) the aircraft carries sufficient fuel to meet the requirements of section 602.88 and, in addition, carries contingency fuel equal to at least 10 per cent of the fuel required pursuant to section 602.88 to complete the flight to the aerodrome of destination.

Landing at or Take-off from an Aerodrome at Night

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall conduct a landing or a take-off in a heavier-than-air aircraft at night at an aerodrome unless the aerodrome is lighted in accordance with the aerodrome lighting requirements specified in Part III.

  • (2) A person may conduct a landing or a take-off in a heavier-than-air aircraft at night at an aerodrome that is not lighted in accordance with the requirements referred to in subsection (1) where

    • (a) the flight is conducted without creating a hazard to persons or property on the surface; and

    • (b) the aircraft is operated

      • (i) for the purpose of a police operation that is conducted in the service of a police authority, or

      • (ii) for the purpose of saving human life.

Unmanned Air Vehicles

 No person shall operate an unmanned air vehicle in flight except in accordance with a special flight operations certificate or an air operator certificate.

  • SOR/2003-271, s. 6.

Large Unoccupied Free Balloons

 No person shall release an unoccupied free balloon having a gas-carrying capacity of more than 115 cubic feet (3.256 m3) except in accordance with an authorization issued by the Minister pursuant to section 602.44.

Rockets

 No person shall launch a rocket, other than a model rocket or a rocket of a type used in a fireworks display, except in accordance with an authorization issued by the Minister pursuant to section 602.44.

Authorization by the Minister

 The Minister may issue an authorization referred to in section 602.42 or 602.43 where the release of the balloon or the launch of the rocket is in the public interest and is not likely to affect aviation safety.

Model Aircraft, Kites and Model Rockets

 No person shall fly a model aircraft or a kite or launch a model rocket or a rocket of a type used in a fireworks display into cloud or in a manner that is or is likely to be hazardous to aviation safety.

Refusal to Transport

 No air operator or private operator shall transport a person if at the time of check-in or at boarding the actions or statements of the person indicate that the person may present a risk to the safety of the aircraft, persons or property.

  • SOR/2009-90, s. 3.

[602.47 to 602.56 reserved]

Division II — Operational and Emergency Equipment Requirements

Application

 This Division applies to persons operating

  • (a) Canadian aircraft; and

  • (b) foreign aircraft in Canada where those persons are Canadian citizens, permanent residents or corporations incorporated by or under the laws of Canada or a province.

Prohibition

 No person shall operate an aircraft referred to in section 602.57 unless the operational and emergency equipment required by these Regulations is carried on board.

Equipment Standards

  •  (1) Subject to subsection (2), no person shall operate an aircraft unless the operational and emergency equipment carried on board the aircraft

    • (a) meets the applicable standards specified in the Airworthiness Manual; and

    • (b) is functional.

  • (2) Paragraph (1)(a) does not apply in respect of the following operational and emergency equipment:

    • (a) survival equipment;

    • (b) a personal flotation device;

    • (c) a hand-held fire extinguisher, except if carried on board an aircraft operated under Subpart 4 or Part VII, where the extinguisher meets the applicable standards published by the Canadian Standards Association;

    • (d) a first aid kit, except if carried on board an aircraft operated under Subpart 4 or Part VII;

    • (e) aeronautical charts and publications;

    • (f) a timepiece; and

    • (g) a flashlight.

Requirements for Power-driven Aircraft

  •  (1) No person shall conduct a take-off in a power-driven aircraft, other than an ultra-light aeroplane, unless the following operational and emergency equipment is carried on board:

    • (a) a checklist or placards that enable the aircraft to be operated in accordance with limitations specified in the aircraft flight manual, aircraft operating manual, pilot operating handbook or any equivalent document provided by the manufacturer;

    • (b) all of the necessary current aeronautical charts and publications covering the route of the proposed flight and any probable diversionary route, if the aircraft is operated in VFR OTT, night VFR flight or IFR flight;

    • (c) a current database, if the aircraft is operated in IFR flight, in VFR OTT flight or in night VFR flight under Subpart 4 of Part VI or Subpart 2, 3, 4 or 5 of Part VII and database-dependent navigation equipment is used;

    • (d) current data covering the route of the proposed flight and any probable diversionary route, if the aircraft is operated in VFR OTT flight other than VFR OTT flight referred to in paragraph (c) and database-dependent navigation equipment is used;

    • (e) a hand-held fire extinguisher in the cockpit that

      • (i) is of a type suitable for extinguishing fires that are likely to occur,

      • (ii) is designed to minimize the hazard of toxic gas concentrations, and

      • (iii) is readily available to each flight crew member;

    • (f) a timepiece that is readily available to each flight crew member;

    • (g) a flashlight that is readily available to each crew member, if the aircraft is operated at night; and

    • (h) a first aid kit.

  • (2) A checklist or placards referred to in paragraph (1)(a) shall enable the aircraft to be operated in normal, abnormal and emergency conditions and shall include

    • (a) a pre-start check;

    • (b) a pre-take-off check;

    • (c) a post-take-off check;

    • (d) a pre-landing check; and

    • (e) emergency procedures.

  • (3) Emergency procedures referred to in paragraph (2)(e) shall include

    • (a) emergency operation of fuel, hydraulic, electrical and mechanical systems, where applicable;

    • (b) emergency operation of instruments and controls, where applicable;

    • (c) engine inoperative procedures; and

    • (d) any other procedure that is necessary for aviation safety.

  • (4) Checks and emergency procedures referred to in subsections (2) and (3) shall be performed and followed where they are applicable.

  • SOR/2006-77, s. 9;
  • SOR/2015-160, s. 27(F).
 
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